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Johnnie M

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About Johnnie M

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    Member

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  • Gender
    Male
  • Location
    SE London
  • Interests
    Driving and travelling. Sadly the driving is on hold until the DVLA say so! Ouch.
  1. Welcome Kelly. I am in the same position as you although it is only 7 months since my stroke. Not having a driving licence is making me more depressed than the stroke makes me! Anyway, I presume that you are aware that you'll have to reapply under the 'exceptional circumstances rule? There are some really good pieces of advice above here in this very thread, from people who still have quadrantanopia but got their licence back. Maybe you need to contact DVLA every week to make sure that they actually do something about your application? Please let us know how you get on with the process as I shall be starting my own in a few months time. Please update when movement is made. Many thanks.
  2. Thanks you for all your lovely and welcoming responses. I have a lovely support system at home too and my grown up children make sure that I have a smile on my face. My more remote family (mum in New Zealand and Aunt in Vancouver) feel somewhat hide bound and useless but Facetime and Skype make depicting my condition so much easier. I can't imagine how people that are post-stroke, cope with telling loved ones that can't see them on a screen or face to face. So many different possible results for stroke victims. As I said, I couldn't tell my wife that I had had a stroke, even when I knew I had to stay in hospital. I mentioned it after the CT scan the following day. I knew she would have been worried but when the S word is mentioned the imagination kicks in and in my case, would have made things worse for her. When I walked in the door the following afternoon looking no different from the day before, she was really quite shocked but then completely understood my reluctance to explain before I did (although she didn't really like that ploy!).
  3. Thanks so much Daffodil for your kind comments and encouragement. I posted initially because, having read a lot of the various posts in this website, I felt that almost everyone else had been so badly affected by their 'incident' that I felt somewhat fraudulent in being here at all. I can't say that the stroke I had has really made a massive difference to my existence (except the driving thing and the realisation that there could be worse around the corner!). I shall, however, continue to contribute if my experience may help others. That's what it is all about isn't it. Re your PS, yes it seems to be a marvellous job but I think most do it for the love of dance, singing and acting generally rather than to become wealthy. I had a bizarre night last night at the after party for the opening of Carousel, in which she appears with Alfie Boe, Katherine Jenkins and Nicholas Lyndhurst. There were so many acting greats there milling about and I even had a chat with Nicholas Lyndhurst, who was just lovely. I shall continue to bask in the reflected glory and skills of my daughter!
  4. Thanks for the response Winb, you seem to have a fantastic attitude to the S word! I sing too! How mad is that?! I am a big musical theatre fan. I always have been ever since I saw Mary Poppins in the 60's I think! Luckily my daughter is now at the top of the musical theatre game and is appearing in Carousel at the London Coliseum with Alfie Boe and Katherine Jenkins! The trouble is that the songs in musicals always become earworms to me and often keep me awake at night. Whatever you do be careful if you ever go to see Half a Sixpence! It's amazing but the songs get stuck in your head! Hehe. All the very best to you. JM
  5. Hi all! A relative newbie here; attracted to the site because I have quadrantanopia following an ischaemic stroke with haemorraghic transformation in the left occipital lobe. My driving licence has been revoked by the DVLA. Some of the post below is copied from another part of the site in which I responded to someone else's question so apologies if you've seen it before! I am just wondering where I fit in on this site. I have no idea what an SAH is and whether that correlates with what happened to me? Am I relevant here? Have others experienced what I experienced? I really don't want to waste the precious time of others but I think that I have had an experience that many others would benefit from knowing about. I am 56 years old and had no idea I had, or was having, a stroke. With strokes to the back of the head (I am told by a consultant) there are none of the signs that television adverts tell us to look out for in others. I was on the way to work and I had a headache at the top of my neck and back of my head, that is all. I am not prone to headaches. When I arrived at work, after a week off driving the mountains of the French Alps, I started typing an email and found that part of my right vision was missing. I thought it might have been a cricked vertebra in my neck pinching a nerve, or a detached retina. I went first to my Chiropractor. It wasn't a pinched nerve in the neck. I then took myself off to Moorfields eye hospital. The consultant said, "it's not your eyes so it must be neurological". It was then that the 'S' word was first mentioned! They put me in a taxi to University College Hospital and I stayed for 24 hours being prodded and poked and thoroughly checked out. CT scan, MRI scan, Physio coordination checks etc etc. The staff on the stroke unit were a marvel. I dared not tell my wife why I was in hospital because when a stroke is mentioned the immediate image that springs to mind is a massive loss of movement, not being able to walk or lift an arm, collapsed face and dribbling! I mean that in a tongue in cheek way but it is true; people always think the worst until they see you. My wife is the sort of person who would have panicked and rushed to see me when really there was no point in her making a massive journey to see me looking exactly as I was when I left first thing that morning. I was back at work a week later, although I imposed fewer working hours on myself as, luckily, I own my own business with four other guys and have very supportive partners and staff. Six months later I am back to where I was work-wise. Still trying not to stress too much though and still dreaming of getting back behind the wheel and joining my mates on the annual driving trip to Europe in 2018!
  6. Not sure what you are referring to by way of your question Thegiftofsight but if it refers to the diagnosis I don't really know what the medical terms mean! I have simply transposed the Consultants diagnosis onto the above post. There are many on here that will know I am sure. A Transient Ischaemic Attack (commonly known as a TIA) is just that, transient. If I had had a TIA and not the subsequent haemorraghic transformation then I presume that I would have had my eyesight back within 24 - 48 hours. I didn't, but have been left with an area of eyesight that is just not there (to the right in each eye and on almost an horizontal plane). In fact, it's not the eyes that aren't working but a part of my brain of the left occipital lobe (at the back of the neck and the lower part of the head I think!). The left occipital lobe controls the right side of sight etc and the right lobe controls the left. I'd like to think that some of the posts on line (around the world) are true and the nerves eventually grow back but since it is now over six months and there has been no great signs of improvement, I am not sure that this is the case. Everyone is different and it would appear that some get improvement and some don't. I am 56 years old by the way and had no idea I had had a stroke. With strokes to the back of the head (I am told) there are none of the signs that adverts tell us to look out for in others. I had a headache, that is all. I am not prone to headaches. When I arrived at work I started typing an email and found that part of my right vision was missing. I thought it might have been a cricked vertebra in my neck pinching a nerve, or a detached retina. I went first to my Chiropractic. It wasn't a pinched nerve in the neck. I then took myself off to Moorfields eye hospital. The consultant said, it's not your eyes so it must be neurological. It was then that the 'S' word was mentioned! They put me in a taxi to University College Hospital and I stayed for 24 hours being prodded and poked and thoroughly checked out. CT scan, MRI scan, Physio checks etc etc. They were a marvel. I dared not tell my wife when I was in hospital because when a stroke is mentioned the immediate image that springs to mind is massive loss of movement, not being able to walk or lift an arm, collapsed face and dribbling! I mean that in a tongue in cheek way but it is true; people always think the worst until they see you. I was back at work a week later, although I imposed fewer work hours on myself as, luckily, I own my own business and have very supportive partners and staff. Six months later I am back to where I was work-wise. Still trying not to stress too much though and still dreaming of getting back behind the wheel and joining my mates on the annual driving trip to Europe in 2018! Regards
  7. Thanks for so much information Hoofbeat. You are a marvel! I shall fixate on the test and have plans to start the process at the end of July, in accordance with the DVLA rules. First hurdle is the meeting I have with the Neuro Opthalmologist later this month. I hope that they are used to people asking them what it is we have to do to get the right tests to be seen as an exceptional circumstance by the DVLA! For background information, I had a left occipital ischemic stroke with haemorraghic transformation in Sept 2016 and was left only with right inferior quadrantanopia. Long words eh! All the best...
  8. Hi Hoofbeat! Many congrats, firstly on getting your licence back and secondly on your firstborn! Parenthood is a joy! And thank you so much for your fulsome response. I feel so certain that I could drive as well as anyone (better than some!) that I just couldn't even countenance the possibility of not driving again. I may not be confident to blat around the mountains and passes of Europe like I have for so many years but getting out and enjoying some 'me' time with my car seems now to be a possibility! I have so many questions about the actual test but that can wait as I have a few hoops to jump though yet. My 'episode' was on 26th Sept 2016 so I guess I could start the process in middle of August 2017? I am seeing a Neuro Opthalmologist from NHS on 25th this month (first visit) so I shall see what their view is on my vision and get an update from my Esterman test taken last October (after which DVLA revoked my licence). If they are not sufficiently helpful I shall bring out the big guns and go private if necessary. I always felt that the NHS was as good as one can get but this may be a different scenario! It's all about the licence now! Many thanks again for your help and I shall be sure to update you as time goes by. Some time to go yet though; hope was all I needed. x
  9. I am wondering whether Kerryb is still around on this forum? You seemed to have got your licence back in just over one year. May I ask whether this was the result of getting back to pretty clear vision or was it via a driving test after DVLA cleared you on all the other criteria for an exceptional circumstance? I realise that you did have a test early on but maybe you had a test later that ended up you getting your licence back? Anyone else with quadrantanopia that got their licence back on the 'exceptional circumstances' remit from DVLA? I am over six months from my occipital stroke I can't recognise any great improvement but would easily pass the criteria set by the DVLA to be allowed to take a driving test. The loss of sight, in my case, feels pretty minimal and is having barely any effect on my existence. I would be a more confident driver than my wife I think! Anyone here been cleared to take a DVLA test as an exceptional circumstance? Hoping for good news as I can't bear not being able to drive!
  10. Thanks Super! It's a shame that they didn't keep people informed of their own progress. Perhaps she got her licence back and life is not revolving around when she might get her licence back any more? Whatever, it would be great to have a conclusion. JM
  11. Any update from Hoofbeat on this. I am a newbie here and had my licence revoked (due to right peripheral vision lost, quadrantanopia) in November 2016. It's like having my life blood cut off. I take an annual holiday each year with pals driving in the mountains of Europe. No more it seems! Well, perhaps until the year is up and I can be retested. I have found no great improvement since the stroke on 26th Sept 2016 so presume any improvement will happen very slowly, if at all. I had no signs of having a stroke; just a headache and loss of periphery vision. No movement or coordination issues so anyone looking at me would not have known at all! It would be good to hear whether Hoofbeat ever got her licence back as her situation seems closest to mine. Johnnie M