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Johnnie M

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15 Good

About Johnnie M

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    Member

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  • Gender
    Male
  • Location
    SE London
  • Interests
    Driving and travelling. Sadly the driving is on hold until the DVLA say so! Ouch.
  1. Quadrantanopia

    Kelly I note what you say about your Aunts vision but I am pretty sure that you and I have much more visual field than she does, or anyone with only one eye. If I put my hand over my right eye then I can see perhaps 40% of what I can see with both eyes open and therefore my view is that the rules just aren't fair across the board. I try to be positive and at no point have I thought that I wont ever drive again. It may take years but I love it so much that I can't countenance life without a car. If I get a no I shall probably use a lawyer to appeal as the rules have to be applied to everyone the same. It cannot depend on who at the DVLA is dealing with it and which doctors you use. The criteria are the same for everyone and if the criteria are met then the driving assessment should be made available to you. It really is as simple as that! The criteria are set by the DVLA after all is said and done. Chin up Kels!!
  2. Quadrantanopia

    Fantastic news Kelly! I am sure that you will fly through it. Please come back here to let us know how you got on and what the DVLA response is. I caught a glimpse of a programme on TV last night which documents drivers who are over 90 years old. I have a work colleague who has parkinsons and he is still driving. I know of a woman that has one eye and she drives to work every day. It all seems rather unfair doesn't it! JM
  3. Quadrantanopia

    Anne. I think you may have misunderstood my post. I still don't have my licence back. If you read further up the thread you'll see all the things that you'll need to apply to DVLA as an 'exceptional circumstance'. If they have refused you already then perhaps it won't be possible. It is all in the DVLA website too. I think there is a link above in the thread somewhere. Im just having to keep my fingers crossed!
  4. Quadrantanopia

    Hello all. I have had confirmation from DVLA that my letter/application has been received (on 13th August actually) and have chased them to see what the progress is like. All they have been able to confirm is that it is now with the medical team to review and comment on but that there is no priority system. My application will be taken in turn with all the others and may therefore be a while. Looking at the time that Kelly's took to be looked at, it may be some time yet! Any news from DVLA Kelly? I am keeping my fingers crossed for you. My pals are off tomorrow morning on the annual driving trip to Europe. Through Spain and Portugal this year. I am gutted that I can't go. Well, I could be a passenger but that would be torture for me. Some amazing cars but the best is always the one I am driving (emphasis on the word 'driving'. It's not the best but you know what I mean!). I'll just have to cope with updates by way of photos and videos. Sad face.....
  5. Quadrantanopia

    Thanks Kelly. That information is helpful. It means that I don't have to spend £250 on an occupational therapist assessment. Phew! JM
  6. Quadrantanopia

    Kelly Another quick question if you don't mind? Who provided clinical confirmation of your full functional adaptation to the loss of vision? Was it your GP? DVLA confirmed today that they received the my letter and information on 13th August and have passed it on to another department for review. No mention of when I could expect a response and I didn't want to be too pushy as the calls are recorded and it wouldn't be good to start the process and be seen as a pusher. I shall call again in a couple of weeks to see if there is any update. A gentle reminder, I am sure, can't hurt. Thanks for any response. Johnnie
  7. Quadrantanopia

    Well I am guessing that the hoops were the same as those you were advised, as on the DVLA website and included in the letter they sent you when your licence was revoked? There were the ones I have been told about.... Group 1 drivers whose previous full driving entitlement was removed because of a field defect failing to satisfy the standard may be eligible for individual relicensing consideration as exceptional cases under the following strict criteria: · defect must have been · present for at least 12 months · caused by an isolated event or a non-progressive condition · there must be no other condition or pathology regarded as progressive and likely to be affecting the visual fields (panel’s advice is that certain medical conditions, for example glaucoma and retinitis pigmentosa, would always be considered as progressive and so could not be considered as exceptional cases) · sight in both eyes · no uncontrolled diplopia · no other impairment of visual function, including · no glare sensitivity, contrast sensitivity or impairment of twilight vision · clinical confirmation of full functional adaptation For exceptional cases considered to be potentially licensable under these criteria, the DVLA will then require a satisfactory practical driving assessment at an approved centre (see Appendix G). Is this the same as you received? I call them 'hoops to jump through' but that might be a little over dramatic! Haha.
  8. Quadrantanopia

    Good to hear from you Kelly but sorry to hear it is going so slowly for you! The DVLA told me that I should get a response fairly quickly but I am definitely going to call every two weeks to chase them up. When I wrote I provided all the information they asked for in their letter to me last year, which detailed what hoops I needed to jump through to be considered as 'an exceptional case'. I used their numbering and reiterated all their requirements in bold caps before answering each one individually. It should be so easy for the person at the DVLA to read and understand that I cannot conceive how they would need to ask for much more of me other than another Esterman and eye health check test, clinical confirmation that I have adapted to the loss of vision and then, finally, a driving assessment. No-one at DVLA was able to confirm which clinical professional should provide the report on my adaptation to the loss of vision (quite why I have no idea. since it is they who make the rules!) but I told them that I had contacted a qualified Occupational Therapist and she would be able to provide such a report. However, I explained that this was quite expensive (£250) and could they let me know if a letter from my GP would suffice. I am hoping that a GP's letter will do the trick! I also sent them a field of vision test I had done by a neuro-opthalomologist in June along with her report confirming that the eye test showed similar results to that I had done at Specsavers last November, following which my licence was revoked. The way I look at it is this: if my eyesight hasn't got worse since my first Esterman test (from which they revoked my licence) and they sent me a letter suggesting that I can re-apply subject to certain conditions (and I meet those conditions), how can they refuse me a driving assessment? I don't write their rules; they do. If I pass their criteria (as do you) then there is no way they should be able to refuse me (or you). No? I shall let you know how I get on. All the best to you. JM
  9. Quadrantanopia

    I was wondering if Kelly has any further news on getting her licence back? I have started the process now and am waiting to hear back from DVLA as to whether they are happy to accept me as an exceptional case. My eyesight has not returned sufficient to get it back without a driving assessment (I don't think) but I pass all the other criteria. Fingers crossed that they allow me to the next stage!
  10. Quadrantanopia

    Welcome Kelly. I am in the same position as you although it is only 7 months since my stroke. Not having a driving licence is making me more depressed than the stroke makes me! Anyway, I presume that you are aware that you'll have to reapply under the 'exceptional circumstances rule? There are some really good pieces of advice above here in this very thread, from people who still have quadrantanopia but got their licence back. Maybe you need to contact DVLA every week to make sure that they actually do something about your application? Please let us know how you get on with the process as I shall be starting my own in a few months time. Please update when movement is made. Many thanks.
  11. Where do I fit in here?

    Thanks you for all your lovely and welcoming responses. I have a lovely support system at home too and my grown up children make sure that I have a smile on my face. My more remote family (mum in New Zealand and Aunt in Vancouver) feel somewhat hide bound and useless but Facetime and Skype make depicting my condition so much easier. I can't imagine how people that are post-stroke, cope with telling loved ones that can't see them on a screen or face to face. So many different possible results for stroke victims. As I said, I couldn't tell my wife that I had had a stroke, even when I knew I had to stay in hospital. I mentioned it after the CT scan the following day. I knew she would have been worried but when the S word is mentioned the imagination kicks in and in my case, would have made things worse for her. When I walked in the door the following afternoon looking no different from the day before, she was really quite shocked but then completely understood my reluctance to explain before I did (although she didn't really like that ploy!).
  12. Where do I fit in here?

    Thanks so much Daffodil for your kind comments and encouragement. I posted initially because, having read a lot of the various posts in this website, I felt that almost everyone else had been so badly affected by their 'incident' that I felt somewhat fraudulent in being here at all. I can't say that the stroke I had has really made a massive difference to my existence (except the driving thing and the realisation that there could be worse around the corner!). I shall, however, continue to contribute if my experience may help others. That's what it is all about isn't it. Re your PS, yes it seems to be a marvellous job but I think most do it for the love of dance, singing and acting generally rather than to become wealthy. I had a bizarre night last night at the after party for the opening of Carousel, in which she appears with Alfie Boe, Katherine Jenkins and Nicholas Lyndhurst. There were so many acting greats there milling about and I even had a chat with Nicholas Lyndhurst, who was just lovely. I shall continue to bask in the reflected glory and skills of my daughter!
  13. Where do I fit in here?

    Thanks for the response Winb, you seem to have a fantastic attitude to the S word! I sing too! How mad is that?! I am a big musical theatre fan. I always have been ever since I saw Mary Poppins in the 60's I think! Luckily my daughter is now at the top of the musical theatre game and is appearing in Carousel at the London Coliseum with Alfie Boe and Katherine Jenkins! The trouble is that the songs in musicals always become earworms to me and often keep me awake at night. Whatever you do be careful if you ever go to see Half a Sixpence! It's amazing but the songs get stuck in your head! Hehe. All the very best to you. JM
  14. Where do I fit in here?

    Hi all! A relative newbie here; attracted to the site because I have quadrantanopia following an ischaemic stroke with haemorraghic transformation in the left occipital lobe. My driving licence has been revoked by the DVLA. Some of the post below is copied from another part of the site in which I responded to someone else's question so apologies if you've seen it before! I am just wondering where I fit in on this site. I have no idea what an SAH is and whether that correlates with what happened to me? Am I relevant here? Have others experienced what I experienced? I really don't want to waste the precious time of others but I think that I have had an experience that many others would benefit from knowing about. I am 56 years old and had no idea I had, or was having, a stroke. With strokes to the back of the head (I am told by a consultant) there are none of the signs that television adverts tell us to look out for in others. I was on the way to work and I had a headache at the top of my neck and back of my head, that is all. I am not prone to headaches. When I arrived at work, after a week off driving the mountains of the French Alps, I started typing an email and found that part of my right vision was missing. I thought it might have been a cricked vertebra in my neck pinching a nerve, or a detached retina. I went first to my Chiropractor. It wasn't a pinched nerve in the neck. I then took myself off to Moorfields eye hospital. The consultant said, "it's not your eyes so it must be neurological". It was then that the 'S' word was first mentioned! They put me in a taxi to University College Hospital and I stayed for 24 hours being prodded and poked and thoroughly checked out. CT scan, MRI scan, Physio coordination checks etc etc. The staff on the stroke unit were a marvel. I dared not tell my wife why I was in hospital because when a stroke is mentioned the immediate image that springs to mind is a massive loss of movement, not being able to walk or lift an arm, collapsed face and dribbling! I mean that in a tongue in cheek way but it is true; people always think the worst until they see you. My wife is the sort of person who would have panicked and rushed to see me when really there was no point in her making a massive journey to see me looking exactly as I was when I left first thing that morning. I was back at work a week later, although I imposed fewer working hours on myself as, luckily, I own my own business with four other guys and have very supportive partners and staff. Six months later I am back to where I was work-wise. Still trying not to stress too much though and still dreaming of getting back behind the wheel and joining my mates on the annual driving trip to Europe in 2018!
  15. Quadrantanopia

    Not sure what you are referring to by way of your question Thegiftofsight but if it refers to the diagnosis I don't really know what the medical terms mean! I have simply transposed the Consultants diagnosis onto the above post. There are many on here that will know I am sure. A Transient Ischaemic Attack (commonly known as a TIA) is just that, transient. If I had had a TIA and not the subsequent haemorraghic transformation then I presume that I would have had my eyesight back within 24 - 48 hours. I didn't, but have been left with an area of eyesight that is just not there (to the right in each eye and on almost an horizontal plane). In fact, it's not the eyes that aren't working but a part of my brain of the left occipital lobe (at the back of the neck and the lower part of the head I think!). The left occipital lobe controls the right side of sight etc and the right lobe controls the left. I'd like to think that some of the posts on line (around the world) are true and the nerves eventually grow back but since it is now over six months and there has been no great signs of improvement, I am not sure that this is the case. Everyone is different and it would appear that some get improvement and some don't. I am 56 years old by the way and had no idea I had had a stroke. With strokes to the back of the head (I am told) there are none of the signs that adverts tell us to look out for in others. I had a headache, that is all. I am not prone to headaches. When I arrived at work I started typing an email and found that part of my right vision was missing. I thought it might have been a cricked vertebra in my neck pinching a nerve, or a detached retina. I went first to my Chiropractic. It wasn't a pinched nerve in the neck. I then took myself off to Moorfields eye hospital. The consultant said, it's not your eyes so it must be neurological. It was then that the 'S' word was mentioned! They put me in a taxi to University College Hospital and I stayed for 24 hours being prodded and poked and thoroughly checked out. CT scan, MRI scan, Physio checks etc etc. They were a marvel. I dared not tell my wife when I was in hospital because when a stroke is mentioned the immediate image that springs to mind is massive loss of movement, not being able to walk or lift an arm, collapsed face and dribbling! I mean that in a tongue in cheek way but it is true; people always think the worst until they see you. I was back at work a week later, although I imposed fewer work hours on myself as, luckily, I own my own business and have very supportive partners and staff. Six months later I am back to where I was work-wise. Still trying not to stress too much though and still dreaming of getting back behind the wheel and joining my mates on the annual driving trip to Europe in 2018! Regards