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I had a NASAH 7 months ago. I am finding that my thinking seems impaired at times. My thoughts seem "scrambled" and I worry that I won't be able to talk or I will slur my words if I try - even though i don't. Sometimes it feels like my brain is working too fast, and other times too slow. It seems like it could be a stress reaction from so much worry, but I was wondering if anyone else experiences cognitive issues like this.

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My thoughts are often scrambled, to try to keep a clear brain I try to concentrate on only one thing at a time.

I don't slur or anything but the words come out all mixed up making no sense whatsoever. I try to speak very slowly thinking about each word that is coming out of my mouth.

Mind you, I have caused some hilarious moments at times.

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Hi DBC

 

I ask my hubby something and then I ask him again and he says "Yes Win you told me that"  I just say" just a reminder" but  short term memory is awful.  But is  a bit better than it was, not much but better lol.

 

You will get there eventually and as Super has said you can have a laugh while trying !!  Try not to worry too much !! 

 

Good luck 

Win xxx

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I remember a time in my recovery that my words would jumble,or my words didn’t match my thoughts. I humiliated myself on several occasions with sales clerks and such. It is really frustrating. I seldom have a problem now unless I’m very tired or upset. 

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There is a topic on here called 'Difficulty finding words sometimes' I highly recommend you read it, might make you feel a bit better, and less frightened of making mistakes while talking,  because one of the great things about the English language is there is so many different ways to say things, you can just take a scenic route instead.

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I'm only just 2 weeks past my SAH, but finding it hard to concentrate. I struggle to find words and am finding I now stutter a bit. My bleed was relatively small and I was very lucky. I have what can only be described as a constant ache burning sensation over one side of my head. I'm hoping it will resolve in time but can certainly sympathise with you. Hope you get better soon. 

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Yes I can relate to thinking problems.  

 

I was pretty hateful to the speech therapist in rehab because she would always want me to do things that made me struggle...made me realize something had happened to me...

 

I came home struggling in the kitchen...couldn't remember all the ingredients in a salad, seems simple right, but just couldn't do it.  

 

I felt like life had become a puzzle that was constantly challenging me...Coming up to 9 months now and I am better but not back to normal...but I think I will continue to improve and perhaps find a new normal...  

 

I will still roam the supermarket going back and forth looking for things....if I don't make a list in the order of the store aisles....thank goodness I know them...  

 

When I am tired I am much worse so I aim to do more difficult things when I am rested...I think you may be surprised how things improve....I only realized this when some time went by and I could look back...

 

I feel lucky to be able to work on getting better most days...but other days I struggle and feel a bit down....one day at a time.......

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I have memory problems.  I am not able to focus on intense problems.  I can't multi-task as well.  All part of the new me.  But I breathe, so I will take it.

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Hi dbc,

I'm nearly 4 years since my SAH, at the start of my recovery I couldn't string a sentence together and it was very frustrating, my words would get stuck, I knew exactly what I wanted to say but it just wouldn't come out.

Like Super Mario I have had some hilarious moments with some of the things I have said.

 

I have to do things a little slower now, think about one thing at a time, I find thinking very difficult if there is a lot of background noise, my brain can't filter that out anymore or at least not like it used to.

 

I have improved as time has gone on, when I am tired or stressed I notice it more, my partner has to go shopping with me because I have a tendency to leave debit cards in machines and struggle working with money, but I am learning to live with this new me.

 

You will get there, 7 months is still early in your recovery, as others have said take one day at a time.

 

Wishing you well

Love 

Michelle xx 

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Hi, there is a word for it, it’s called Aphasia. For many it is a symptom of brain injury  that goes away as the blood disperses and the healing continues but for others there can be some more permanent lasting effect of this.

 

i had it explained to me that language can be impaired similar to forming new memories,  it seems blood ov3 the surface of a brain can do some strange things so it’s not we have a bad memory now it’s our ability to form and then recall memory is damaged, and the same can be for words. And so it’s takes time, new techniques to deal with it.

 

i had Neuro physiologist conduct cognitive tests about 15 months out from my SAH  to assess and help me where my defecits now were and that’s helped me and I could share the report with work which also helped make adjustments. Every bleed is different so if you feel you are struggling then I would push to be assessed. 

 

its early days for you so be kind to yourself and just slow down, Super Mario offers sensible advice to do one thing at a time. 

 

at first this loss of words and struggling with my new speed of processing embarrassed me  especially if I said the wrong thing or couldn’t find the words but a bit like others the extent to which I do this has lessened over time But if I am am tired or try to do too much then I lose words and jumble them and now we can just laugh about it but I did find it quite distressing until i learnt to heed it as a signal I was pushing my brain too far in that moment. 

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My brother gave me a book about "mindfulness" and their form of meditation and it has helped me immensely!!! i could even say it changed my life. 99% of our actions, according to mindfulness, are not our own, but our brains being placed on the "autopilot" setting. Mindfulness (it's name derives from being the opposite of mindlessness) teaches you to turn off the autopilot and use your brain as if you were a pilot of an airplane. He switched off autopilot and grabbed the wheel to take control of your brain. 

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Thanks everyone - these are all very helpful comments. Did you all have non-aneurysmal sah's?

 

The trouble I am having is that the neurosurgeon who followed my through my hospitalization released me with no follow up - no restrictions - and told me to go back to my normal activities. So it is concerning me that I am still feeling so bad. I didn't expect to notice cognitive issues - and I don't remember having them after the event. So that makes me wonder if this is something new.

 

Sometimes I just feel jumbled - very hard to explain. If I had felt this way from the very beginning I would think it was part of my recovery but just strange it is popping up now; maybe I didn't notice it at first. Also sometimes my face feels tight and I freak out that I am going to have a stroke. A lot of this could be anxiety but how do you know?  I also didn't think I would still be feeling so dizzy and tired and headaches, etc. If this is all normal the doctor didn't paint a very accurate picture of what to expect... I appreciate being able to speak with you all.

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Hi dbc,

I did have a non aneurysmal sah followed by vasospasm 3 days later...I was released like you no restrictions...go live your life...it felt crazy to me..like you I was still feeling bad and am left with some cognitive issues...

 

I had new symptoms probably 2 to 3 months after the original event...which like you made me feel like something was wrong...I did have another MRI and was told they saw nothing new and attributed it to RCVS which I have read and read about as it seems to be an umbrella term...

I worry every time I post here I have said the same thing..(probably have..I apologize)  

 

I am as my name says Swishy...that is how I feel...and fatigue is ever present... but...10 months out I am working, have taken a trip and just booked another and living my best life.... this is part of me...part of my history....but not all of me ..

wishing you well

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My Surgeon said I do not need to see you again (in letter form) but if you feel low or something isn't right see your own Doc and make appointment to see me. (My words). At first I was scared of cutting link with hospital.

 

So I felt out on a limb but you get back to the old you pretty quickly and at first I was worried I hadn't got the Hospital to lean on.  But I had the male nurses tele No. 

 

We do worry but we will get there eventually, I got up and cleaned the hob  today and wiped down kitchen tops and I feel I have given my Daughter a break (pun not intended)she fractured her ankle xx

 

Be well all and No Stress xxxxxxxxx As I always say !!! lol 

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Hiya,

 

I had my bleed 3 years ago and showed signs of cognitive issues from the outset (so much so that I was tested before leaving the hospital and then discharged into rehab). 

 

I found I would often lose words or use the incorrect word for something (it was often a related word, for example I would say shoe when I meant sock and in rehab they told me this was because of the way our brains store words - we store similar words in the same place). I would also stutter or slur words and this would get worse when I was fatigued. 

 

Over the past 3 years this has improved, although I do still get it. Stress and fatigue make it worse. I tend to find I have to slow down and speak more slowly to ensure I get the words out. 

 

If you are concerned then it might be worth getting back in touch with your doctor to discuss a follow up or see if you could have some tests done?

 

Gemma

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