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  3. Louise

    12 Hour shifts

    Hi there Not the same thing I know but wife of someone who does 12hours shifts from time to time (next one on Sat funny enough then Tues 18th) and for me they are shattering & I'm not the one working.. Its hard on even the ones that haven't had a SAH and all the challenges that goes along with it.
  4. Winb143

    12 Hour shifts

    Joe, Are your bosses helpful if so have an extra 1/2 hour at lunchtime and try to dose off at desk and like wise tea breaks. I need a sleep in the day or doze off in chair but I am not working. I admire all that get back into the swing so quickly. I go shopping and come back shattered ..So whatever happens I wish you all the best. Good luck and tell Bosses perhaps a camp bed for 1/2 hours kip or whatever. Keep Well and let us know how you get on xxxxx
  5. Catwoman23

    12 Hour shifts

    I cannot give you med advice but I m sure you can get a note from your doc that says you need scheduled breaks. Sometimes looking at computer screen can give one headaches even without history of SAH. You can say something like at least such and such minutes within such and such time period. Good luck
  6. Joe2384

    12 Hour shifts

    Thankyou for all your comments. My job is not entirely screen based as it involves a variety of things but when im not having a break it is either watching a screen or doing something active which is taking its tole on my body. And with these issues it is also deteriorating my mental health regarding with what the future holds. I am only 25 and have 40 years of work ahead of me. I am struggling to come to terms with my potential employment in the future.
  7. Last week
  8. subzero

    12 Hour shifts

    Hello Joe … also welcome to BTG. Sorry to hear of the issues and difficult decisions you are facing two years on. You are certainly not alone when it comes to dealing with trying to get back to `work as usual`. Often the reduced quality of life caused by straining to cope with a series of full shift will eventually `force` you to make decisions which you have been trying to put off. In addition to Maccas suggestions I would add that my wife also asked her employer to provide her with much larger screen monitor. This really helped her cope following her reduced eyesight issues. While she did return to her stressful fulltime employment, she eventually reduced her hours and also transferred to less stressful work. Lifestyle and family/ financial commitments can often make this decision very challenging. I do hope you and your partner continue to talk through the realistic options for you both. Subs
  9. I'm 3 1/2 years past my SAH. I went back to work 3 months after it - first month back 3 days a week, second month 4 days then full time. By the time I went back full time I had lots of annual leave allowance so I ended up taking most Friday's off for another few months. Overall I've not had any real negative impact from my SAH. I'm back working full time but I have the benefit of managing my time to fit with my energy levels. I work at home and I've never been a 9-5 worker. I have the benefit of being in control of my own work so it's no issue if I work at 9pm or 10pm if that's when I'm feeling best - as long as the work gets done on time (but no-one ever arranges for 9am meetings for me!). I have been very fortunate in my recovery but going back to work full time was still a struggle. I spent the first 8 or 9 months having a 30min nap every evening when work was finished for the day. I could still do with that sometimes! When I didn't have my nap I was the grumpiest person in the world! I still have lots of 'times out' during the day - walking the dog (well not now since my old boy left me *still sad*), making a cup of tea...whatever, to break up the day and get away from the computer screen. In my previous life I adored spreadsheets (sad, I know!!) but now an hour and it makes me feel ill and a little crazy! So I'd just suggest you be aware of your own stress levels and tiredness and take breaks as you need them. Worst thing is to try and struggle on. As a starter I'd say if you have annual leave to use up then take Wed's off or Friday's or something to break up your week. It definitely helps if that's an option for you, even in the short term. Happy to chat more or offer more advice if I can... Andrea
  10. Swishy

    12 Hour shifts

    Hi Joe, You have my empathy working 12 hour shifts. I did this for sometime way before having my SAH. More than half the people I work with do work 12 hour shifts. Most of them are younger than me...25 to 55...it is difficult for them, even the younger ones. Also doing 4 12's in a row is murder...Can you split them? Another thought , the computers we use allow us to stand or sit, I find this helpful..I hope you find a solution, it is a tough schedule. Best wishes as you move forward, Sincerely, Jean
  11. Macca

    12 Hour shifts

    Hi Joe, I used to sit at a screen a lot. My eyesight was ok, but I got tired after long periods at the screen. You should have a break every half hour, there are plenty of studies that back this up. However, one thing I did do was get my eyes tested and there are three possibilities I know of that will help. One is to see an optician and get them to make you a pair of glasses that are adjusted to your eyes (perfect or not) adjusted for your eyes in relation to the screen you sit at and which take the glare off the screen to make it easier on your eyes. Another is to buy an anti-glare screen that attaches to your VDU, again which takes the glare off and in some cases will increase the font size as well. These days you might be able to change the settings on your screen to do this, so go and see your office computer bloke/lady to see if this can be done for you. Best wishes, Macca
  12. Joe2384

    12 Hour shifts

    I do try to drink plenty of water, usually about 2 litres a day and I had to stop drinking coffee as it was sending me dizzy. However the fatigue is that bad that I’m having to take a energy drink to work on most shifts (including days) just to get me through and stop me wanting to nod off come the half way point of the shift.
  13. Skippy

    12 Hour shifts

    Hey there Whilst you are working these long shifts, are you drinking enough water? Not coffee or tea, but good old water? I sit and stare at a screen from 8am until 4pm and then some more when I come home so about ten hours in all. I'm 12 years in but I've always found that making sure I'm drinking at least two litres of water throughout the day helps with the fatigue and brain function. Definitely make sure, as the others have said, that you rest on your rest days and you take regular breaks from looking at the screen - even if its just closing your eyes for five minutes. Good luck and I hope things improve for you x
  14. ClareM

    12 Hour shifts

    I know how you feel, it has taken a long time to realise that my day off is just that - a day off. If I try and fit too much in I suffer later in the week. Keep up the sitting, relaxing and socialising Clare xx
  15. Joe2384

    12 Hour shifts

    Thankyou for your advice, Having taken on advice from my partner around having more rest time, I am trying to adapt to that. I have always been the sort of person who likes to go and do things and make the most of my time off so to change to doing next to nothing is a very hard task for me. Though to help me adapt, when I do go out I am only going to places like coffee shops where it is more sitting and relaxing and socialising.
  16. ClareM

    12 Hour shifts

    I personally would be unable to work 12 hour shifts . As Super says a key feature would be to take regular breaks away in a quiet area. The stress of being worried about if you are able to cope with the job probably isn't helping either so you need to address that. If here is no way that you can change employment you need to adjust the way you cope with it by making the most of the time you are not working. Make sure that on those 4 days off you totally relax and recuperate, don't get sucked into plans for mammoth days out or household jobs. Unfortunately if you can't change you work pattern you have to change your rest pattern and make sure it is just that - rest. I haven't got any better advice for you. I personally have had many problems with working post SAH and can only say that sometimes we need to adjust our expectations in the way of salary etc. Unfortunate, but your health and well being are more important so if at all possible put them first. Sorry no better advice, good luck! Clare xx
  17. Hi I think a key point in your post is You probably feel great now and your recovery is going well but it is all relevant to the rest you are currently getting. Throw in a bit of pressure on the brain and you may find you are not doing so well. And it probably won't hit you until you stop the pressure meaning you pay later. As you say you cannot truly test out your progress until you are back in your old job, this is certainly true but going back without phasing could be very problematic and a big mistake. You need time for your brain to adjust and you may find that you can't go back to what you did previously. Push it too hard and you will suffer so baby steps are a much better idea. I was in a very high pressure job pre SAH and tried to return to that - unsuccessfully. I phased back slowly but the stress got to me so much so that in the end I changed jobs. I've reduced hours and changed jobs again since then and think I am in a good place now. Saying that, I only work 4 days with Wednesdays off as recuperation day. I am 4 years post bleed and don't think I could work full time now. I wish you luck on whatever you decide and hope which ever way you chose is successful, just remember you brain has had a huge insult so won't take to being treated without a little tlc. Clare xx
  18. Joe2384

    12 Hour shifts

    I do spend time away from a screen though this can vary shift to shift in terms of time and frequency. I’m just currently suffering silently due to being worried about being taken off the job as I hated the time it took to get back to doing it full time, as well as financial problems that could ruin everything that I’ve worked for
  19. Super Mario

    12 Hour shifts

    Just watching a screen is mentally tiring as much as physical work is physically tiring. It is your brain that has taken this assault. By breaks, I mean being able to go to a quiet area with no stimulation at all, not just sitting in front of a screen, to recharge your batteries. I do appreciate that it may not be possible but what about asking your employers and back it up with a letter of recommendation explaining your problems from your occupational therapist. As another thought, are you in a union? If so they may well be able to help negotiate some terms with your employer on your behalf.
  20. Joe2384

    12 Hour shifts

    My job is a job that doesn’t have set breaks so there are times where I can be sat down just watching a screen for instance or I’ll take some breaks to go eat. Been even after quite a lot of being sat down and not being active, I come home exhausted. Just wondered if there was anyone else who has managed to go back to 12 hour shifts and how they are dealing with it, as I feel like eventually I’ll hit a breaking point.
  21. Super Mario

    12 Hour shifts

    Is there any way that you could take frequent breaks during those long shifts? Employers are supposed to make reasonable adjustments and to me that would seem a reasonable adjustment. It is so very sad that you may well have to adjust your lifestyle so you can take a lower paid job. Possibly cut back on housing costs by moving to somewhere cheaper. Obviously we don't know your financial position and we certainly aren't going to intrude on that. Please do not take offence as none is intended, just trying to think of something that may help. At the end of the day your health comes first.
  22. Joe2384

    12 Hour shifts

    It’s very hard as I’m stuck in a position where if I can’t do 12 hours then I can’t do my job. If I was to move position then I would see a massive drop in wage which I can’t afford to lose. I try to take each shift as steady as I can so I don’t tire myself out but the job is fairly manual so sometimes that is very hard to do. The job is 2 days 2 nights and 4 off, so nights won’t be helping that, and I find that I have to spend all my days off not doing much in order to recover in time for my next set of shifts. I’ve been seeing an occupational therapist but she doesn’t seem to come up with any suggestions other then changing role.
  23. Hi all, I am new to the forum so a big hello to everyone. A short introduction - my SAH (grade 1A, blister aneurysm) in mid Dec 2018 surprised docs and nurses given my age (mid 30s) and clean medical history. Having stayed in HDU for a week or so, I moved to the neurological ward for about two weeks before returning home with some general weakness and eye sight problems, but no major physical difficulties. Similar to simonk, https://web.behindthegray.net/topic/7261-coming-up-to-1-year-post-sah/?tab=comments#comment-130884 Personally I feel quite good about my physical recovery so far (limited headaches and dizziness, sight much improved), but family and friends insist that I need longer to recuperate. Having gone through some of the posts here, I definitely understand the need to take it slow and for phased return to work as far as possible. Unfortunately, it would be difficult to arrange shorter hours due to my job nature, so I am afraid it is all-or-nothing in terms of resuming work. So my question is this - do you have any experience with jumping back into full time fast paced positions about 2-3 months post SAH? If so, how did you cope? My main worry is that my seemingly good recovery and conditions are largely due to the ample amount of rest I have at home now, and yet I could not truly test out my progress unless I am in my old "normal" high pressure circumstances again. Thank you in advance. Any thoughts or sharing would be greatly appreciated! caw
  24. jess

    12 Hour shifts

    Hi Joe the longest shift I do is 7 and a half hours that makes my whole body ache sometimes but I have something else wrong as Well Speak to your boss and see if you could perhaps cut your hours down a bit or try something different
  25. I was wondering whether anyone else has returned to 12 hour shift jobs post SAH. I have and I’m now just over 2 years since my accident, but I’m finding that my fatigue is getting worse then say it was a year ago. Does anyone else work 12 hour shifts and suffer with fatigue?
  26. Hi Simon Shame that your insurers are "keen" to see progress! Do you they think you are enjoying the current journey you're on???? Not heard of this treatment used for brain hem recovery to be honest. I had cognitive but not in a bid to get me back to work quicker, more for my own peace of mind and sanity. Can't recall anyone on here having hyperbaric therapy either, but someone may pop up.
  27. Hi all - my insurance company are pretty keen to see 'progress' re increasing hours at work. I explained that I am also very keen to see improved capacity, but 'suggested' to them its a recovery horse before the work cart situation. It has been mentioned to me that hyperbaric oxygen therapy or specialist physiotherapy (neuro-cognitive) may be beneficial. I'm open to the ideas (but am also skeptical of approaches that do not have a solid evidence base). Just wondering whether anyone else has come across these before? And what was your experience? Many thanks!
  28. Macca

    15 Years Tomorrow 4th February

    Congratulations Super Mario!! Have a great day tomorrow!
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