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Showing content with the highest reputation on 15/01/21 in all areas

  1. Many thanks for sharing Sarah. So glad everything went well in the end and hope you wont have too long to wait for your scan results. Well done and for surviving the driving scare. 😊 Subs
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  2. Great advice above. I will only add that you should not expect to get better every day, but you should get better every year for a while. It is a rollercoaster ride of emotions and frustrations. However, I do believe that you will get better with time. I did but it took a while (like over a year) for my memory to start to improve again. Please be patient and stay well. Chris
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  3. Jean, I agree and the best piece of advice that I was given, was to measure your progress from the day that you left hospital ... rather than before the bleed, otherwise you set yourself up to fail ... which was what I was doing for quite some time....failing and feeling utterly miserable and despondent with it. Hence why this website exists, through my own failing and falling flat... and having to come to terms with the fact that I was going to have to take baby steps forward and maybe a few steps back with it. I found that once I became a bit kinder to myself and measured my expe
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  4. Hi there ditto the replies really, keep hydrated, great to hear you spoke to someone from Headway support sometimes just talking to someone helps massivly. dont be fobbed off yes covid makes it harder but you need answers push for help - I didnt and suffered for that...
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  5. Hi Carolyn Some great advice from everyone, i can only agree with what everyone has said. Slow and steady is the way to go with this, your body and your brain have suffered great trauma and they really do need lots of time to recover, i am 6 years down the line and I remember spending much of my first 2 years sleeping and doing things at a very slow pace. I did try and push myself but I did suffer for doing that, i was given some excellent advice when I first joined BTG, that advice was to listen to your body and your brain, they will let you know whe
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  6. I spoke to Headway support person today. Really lovely and supportive and saying much as you are - “be patient. It will get easier”. It’s all about managing expectations. If they’d told me it’ll be a year in first place I’d prob be worrying less!! 🙄
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  7. I agree with Andrea and yes, take time out to put your feet up ... daily....even if you can't snooze. Re-charge the battery for a little while. Again, I think that it's a case of contacting your GP and being referred. To be honest, the earlier that you can do all of this, the better. I was offered CBT (cognitive behaviour therapy and counselling) but at a really late date ... it was more my fault and lack of help, as I only accessed it when I was struggling and then a huge delay .. I never went, as I think that I had more therapy with running this website and learni
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  8. Agree with what Karen says. I'd just add that the first year after my bleed I went for a lie down/snooze every day from 6pm to 7pm. Definitely the quiet and dark is good for resetting things.
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  9. Hi Carolyn, What you're experiencing and feeling is pretty normal post SAH. 5 months post NASAH is so very early in recovery terms ... your brain and body is still recovering from the bleed and you're having to come to terms with the anxiety and panic feelings too. Is it going to happen again? - It's a question and something that we've all felt and it takes quite a bit of time to restore your confidence. I know how you feel and everybody else on this site will know too! Are you pacing yourself with your activity? We've all done it, when we've gon
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  10. Hi JH I believe when they say "without cause" it means the absence of an aneurysm. Any type of SAH is technically classed as a stroke as its a disturbance of the blood flow to the brain. My SAH was caused by a ruptured aneurysm and I was paralysed down the right hand side of my body until after surgery. 14 years on it is still weak compared to my left side. I know that all these tests will be exhausting for your mum and you'll be feeling very protective of her and not wanting her to be poked, prodded and scanned but they wouldn't be doing anything is if it wasn't nec
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  11. Hi JH A very bizarre sequence indeed. As Tina said, your mum is in the best place and I'm sure the Drs will be doing everything they can to find out what has happened. We cannot give medical advice here, but we can offer support and experience. All I can personally deduce from this is that your mum has had a NASAH (and that is not to say I'm right and is something you MUST ask her specialists) - which is rip/rupture/tear of an artery wall without the aneurysm. There is a section on this forum for NASAH and it might be worth you having a look arou
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