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Showing content with the highest reputation on 19/01/21 in all areas

  1. I’m grateful to be able to come her and peruse the posts and comments. It’ll be four years in March since my SAH. I STILL have headaches and a buzzing feeling in my head. But I’m ok with that to be honest. My husband is wonderful and seems to intuitively know when I’m not feeling great. I worked for a medical doctor before retiring and we chatted recently. After doing some research he found a study and told me that 16% of us will live with chronic headaches. They come and go! So I’m resigned to that but so very thankful to still be active! To hike and jog a bit with the dogs and enjoy the outdoors is really good medicine. I Hope each one here has a blessed year.
    7 points
  2. Hello and many thanks for keeping on touch. The years pass by quickly and we (survivors and carers ) learn more about ourselves and how we deal with life post SAH. Great to hear how supportive your husband has been. His life and focus has also undergone much change. 😊 Keep enjoying the outdoors. A great way to bring positivity to a crazy world at the moment. Well done almost four years on. Subs
    2 points
  3. No apologies necessary! The changes can be upsetting and baffling at times. Doesn't it seem that the fatigue hits at a most inconvenient time! We're all able to relate.
    2 points
  4. Hi, The others advice really helped me. I am doing counseling via tel-med with a doctor who has worked with clients with brain bleeds. It is mostly helpful. I may try another doctor. I am almost 6 most post NASAH. I pushed myself back in month 3 because thought I should get ready to go back to work full-time. The ringing in my head increased in volume and doesn't stop...However, the greatest gift I experience is acting kinder and more accepting of myself and not setting goals...my body is the guide. I wish you well on your journey.
    2 points
  5. First let me apologise for this post. It isn’t a happy post, but I need somewhere to rant where people will understand. It’s been 4 1/2 years since my haemorrhage was coiled and I have been through various CBT and OT treatments, as well as a stint on the anti-depressant Sertraline (because apparently my fatigue was due to depression!!). I’m angry (and frustrated) because despite explaining to my family, employers and Doctors, they don’t truly understand the fatigue. They try and are understanding to some extent. I’m sure we all know what the fatigue is like when it hits and I hate it. It makes me feel inadequate, lazy and useless. I think I am still trying to be the person I was before the haemorrhage and it’s starting to really hit that I’m not and probably won’t ever be. I’m currently giving work most of my energy (in order to pay the bills) but it’s leaving me with very little for my home and personal life. It’s like the haemorrhage has robbed me of this. Perhaps my current feelings are part of the acceptance process. I hope so. All that said, I know things could have been a lot worse for me, so I do count myself lucky. Also, having read through many posts here, there are some very brave people and I’m hoping I can draw some strength and inspiration from that. Thank you for giving me the space to get some of these feelings out.
    1 point
  6. Kerry AB, Firstly I am so sorry to hear about your partner's experience (tinged with the being happy that you have a little one on the way!) but depending on the results of the Esterman field test (if the DVLA ask you to take one) you may well find that he is able to keep his licence, espcially as he has been driving for some months, despite the field of vision defect. May I suggest that you come back here once you have heard from the DVLA. You can then appraise us of what their advice is and we can advise as to what the way forward may be for you. The DVLA took 2 days to revoke my licence when they received the results of my Esterman test,. Your partner's results may well be better than mine (I had blind spots near to the middle of my vision) and he may be lucky and retain his licence. If this is not the case then we may be able to help. A word of warning, whatever the DVLA decides is exactly what you have to put up with. I think there is an appeal process and there is certainly a, 'exceptional case' process so please don't give up. Be positive and try not to fret. We will help at whatever stage your partner finds himself. Finally, read the threads in this section. There has been much success in people getting their licences back when they have been revoked (me included). You'll find some really helpful threads here. Johnniem
    1 point
  7. Hello Phi;, I can't type much now due to some neurological issues (unrelated to SAH) but if you chase down these links I think you'll feel better: https://med.virginia.edu/radiology/2017/05/26/living-well-after-surviving-a-subarachnoid-hemorrhage/ https://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0181006 YOU'LL FIND YOU ARE NOT ALONE FOR SURE!
    1 point
  8. The hardest thing is accepting the 'New You' but once you can you can then move forward... took me a long time to do that...
    1 point
  9. Hello Phil, please don`t apologise for sharing how you are feeling. As has been said so many times, we are all here for each other, and getting support and help through the `down` moments is one of the main reasons this BTG site was formed. I was just revisiting your first post when you joined BTG in March 2017. You like many have been very fortunate to survive at all. I am sure you will agree that much of the great advice given by our members back then still applies to your situation today. Working in a high powered stressful environment and taking part in the various physical activities (your 100 mile cycle run) all seem so unachievable now, and you still having to work so hard to provide for your family post SAH is probably the main factor in your continued fatigue. Many of our members feel that fatigue and have not been able to return to work. Getting to that place where you and your family and employers can strike a balance that enables you to feel you are productive at work and also in your home life is so essential. I am sure that our members will share their experiences with you, and I hope that you can once again begin to live with accepting that life after SAH is going to need many changes by yourself and those around you. You can draw on your previous willpower to make this new life a reality so that you can find positivity in building your future again. Face these difficult decisions together and act on what you feel will be best for you. Take care and I wish you well for these challenging times ahead,. Subs
    1 point
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