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weedrea

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weedrea last won the day on March 14 2019

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About weedrea

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  • Birthday 14/05/1976

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    Western Isles

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  1. I feel there is something about people not wanting to see the fragility of life and the realisation that we're not really in control sometimes with what happens with our bodies. I remember a colleague saying to me "but you're fine now" and I was so annoyed I couldn't put together a coherent sentence to answer them. Yes, I am fortunate that I don't have any noticeable physical issues but that doesn't mean I'm fine emotionally or mentally. Some people's reaction seems to be that it's easier to just pretend nothing ever happened.
  2. Very sound advice. I think it's a very good point to stress that it doesn't matter how small the bleed is, there is always some residual impact - whether it's physical, emotional or both. I'd love to say everything was back to where I was before my bleed but, amongst other things, my perspective on life has changed and for me I've balanced how I live and manage stress etc. (i.e. no more 30+ flights a year!). PS Pat - I've maybe said this before but I grew up desperate to go to BC. My gran's brother emigrated out there and we got sent "Beautiful British Columbia" magazine every qua
  3. This sounds quite like me other than mine was caused by an aneurysm that was coiled. But I too didn't lose consciousness and it was a fairly small bleed which had me in hospital for about 10 days. Best advice - take it easy on yourself. Think of this as like having a broken leg, healing will take a while - any blood on the brain causes some level of damage. In my case, I'm 5 1/2 years post bleed but fairly close to where I was before it. Though stress and tiredness impact me much quicker than they used to. I'm back working full time ( I know I've been very lucky!). I also have the benefit of w
  4. Not sure if this is the right place to post this but I've been thinking about how different we can react to similar events/life challenges/lockdown. I came across this interview with Amy Callaghan, the MP who had an SAH earlier this year. It's interesting and honest perspective on dealing with serious illnesses (she's also had cancer twice). https://www.holyrood.com/inside-politics/view,battling-through-exclusive-interview-with-amy-callaghan It reminded me of a song written by Julie Matthews called "The sum of what I am". It was written for a Radio 2 program whic
  5. Agree with what Karen says. I'd just add that the first year after my bleed I went for a lie down/snooze every day from 6pm to 7pm. Definitely the quiet and dark is good for resetting things.
  6. Well a bit of a fright this morning from Google Photos! Here's your photo memory of something that happened 5 years ago today....and it's a picture of me in my hospital bed! Thanks for all the support! Andrea x
  7. The song thrush was out last night in the garden....made me think of Win. x
  8. Matt I'm quite like you as well...two aneurysm, one of which bled. Though if we're taking count, I only needed 1 coil as my aneurysm was so small! I think they needed to get the microscope out to see it. As others have said, take it easy on yourself and remember that you have had brain surgery, and that is definitely not nothing. I took a little longer to get back to work than you and by then had so many holidays that I took every Wednesday off for about 3 or 4 months. I still take a couple of Fridays/half days off when things get too much. Evening snoozes, even for 30 mins, are a
  9. Daff Congratulations on 8 years. When I was in hospital my hubby came across your blog and I want to thank you for writing it. During that scary time in hospital, your blog was a real comfort. Not that you glossed over the difficult moments or made light of it all but because of your honesty at the struggle and adaption you were going through. Like many of us I had no clue how seriously ill I was, what the challenges would be or indeed what recovery (I think you say it better as "adaption") could look like. But your blog helped me know that I was
  10. Welcome to the forum. I'm not sure I can give you any advice here but I know others who have been in similar situations will. Just wanted to say 'hi' and thinking of you as you go through this difficult time. A x
  11. I agree with Skippy....a 'small leak' is still a bleed and any blood on the brain will cause damage, whether that's temporary or not will remain to be seen. I had a coil fitted after a small bleed. I didn't pass out at the time or have any other side effects during recovery but for me it took 3 months before I went back to work and then it was one month for 3 days, then another couple of months for 4 days. Headache was there constantly for about 6 months but have improved greatly since. Tiredness is another side effect to be aware of. I went at least a year with a 30-60 mins nap ev
  12. I had my SAH in 2015. I had an MRI after 6 months, 12 months, 2 years and 4 years. Doctor then told me he never wants to see me again So I think it varies, whether they're happy that things are stable, or low risk etc. I'm a little nervous that the doc doesn't want to see me again but I'm trying to take it as a positive sign! I'd think if they don't want to see you for another 4 years that they're happy with what they've seen over in your last scan. All the best Andrea
  13. I remember as a kid going to the optician and the whole time he called me Amanda rather than Andrea. It definitely didn't fill me with much confidence in his eyesight!!
  14. I was a similar age to you when I had my bleed (I was 39). My advice would be: - Drink lots and lots of water - Have a lie down or nap, even for just 1/2 hr, every evening - does wonders to just give your brain a little rest for a while. I had a whole year of this and still do it when stress levels are high - Take it easy with work. I had 3 months off and then 3 months building back up to full time. I'd recommend either Fridays off to give you a long weekend or Wednesdays. Wednesdays I found particularly helpful so that I was only worki
  15. Very wise to cross the T's etc. I had a period of continual headaches and in the end found out it was caused by sucralose. I'd started taking some supplements to try and help with my arthritis and ended up giving me a constant headache! Fingers crossed that you find some answers.
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