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CaseyR

Members
  • Content Count

    229
  • Joined

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CaseyR last won the day on November 18 2015

CaseyR had the most liked content!

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About CaseyR

  • Rank
    Established Member
  • Birthday 25/08/1951

Profile Information

  • Gender
    Male
  • Location
    Arkansas, USA
  • Interests
    grandkids, gardening, fishing, hunting, camping

Converted

  • Biography
    Male, married, retired, Grandpa
  • Location
    Arkansas
  • Interests
    Grandkids, gardening, hunting/fishing
  • Occupation
    retired
  • SAH/Stroke Date
    11/19/2012

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  1. I have a question. My nasah occurred in 2012 and I have not had any alcohol since. Recently I was prescribed muscle relaxers for my cranky old neck. I took one before bed and woke up during the night drunk as a skunk. I was out of sorts all the next day. I’m in no hurry to take another one. Has anyone had similar experience? I understand alcohol seems to have an increased effect on us with scars on our brains. I’m thinking maybe this muscle relaxer does too?
  2. Congratulations! And well done from a fellow retiree.
  3. Kathy, I’m an Arkansas boy, 68. I was 62 when I had my event, and recall going thru a period of having dizzy spells. It finally resolved itself. As many of my deficits have. I was lucky to be retired and could rest when I needed to. Which was often. I can’t imagine getting through it doing all you are! I suggest you contact your medical team. Sure, barometric swings can throw a curve, but your issue’s sound like your medical folks should be advised. Good luck, and keep us informed on your progress.
  4. Charming, I expect you will get as many answers as there are folks that respond to your question. As for me the only firm no I got was NSAIDS. For an old beat up retired lineman that was hard to deal with. I have discovered things that I do better avoiding such as big crowds, loud environments, anything that may overburden my ability process. As debilities go, I can deal with it. I stay active fishing, puttering in my shop, grandkids. I am blessed. I hope you have a good trip and let us know how it went.
  5. Todd, I’ve not heard of this procedure. Possibly others on here have. Be sure and let us know how it goes. Thanks
  6. Hey Zack, glad you found us. If you’ll look around in this site you’ll find lot’s of helpful information. We can’t give medical advice though. I will say stay hydrated, rested, and kind to yourself.
  7. NukeProf, I was 62 when I experienced my “event”. I experienced no coma at all. I did have a few seizures. I think the area of the brain affected by the bleed determines the symptoms. Although we all seem to be bothered by cognitive fatigue, short term memory loss, and headaches. You seem to be quite fortunate to have recovered well in a short time.
  8. Teri, I suspect we have all been there! You are very early in your recovery. Be kind to yourself, hydrate well and get lot’s of rest. Don’t hesitate to consult with your doctor your concerns.
  9. PatC you are very lucky to not recall the thunderclap! My daughter is a nurse, they refer to a certain med as milk of amnesia.
  10. William, sorry your symptoms have gotten worse. I had a nasah in 2012. I had similar symptoms except fot the gait. My double vision corrected itself quickly. I had trouble with my words as well. I still do sometimes if I’ve over done things. Do your symptoms seem worse. When you are tired? I’ve learned if I fail to hydrate well and try to push through ,when I know it’s time for rest, I pay a price!
  11. Swishy, I had a nasah in 2012. I live in Arkansas and was sent to Little Rock for treatment. I was placed in NSICU for 12 days. I had a phenomenal team caring for me. I had what they called vasospasm’s on something like the third day if I remember correctly. However, they were expecting this. I recall seeing the white board on the wall with instructions to not allow my bp to fall below 150. I was told this was to keep the vessels in my head from collapsing. I remember my nurse telling me “ you may die, but it won’t be your heart that kills you!”.
  12. Iola, it’s good to hear from you. I’m sorry work is troubling you. I retired the year before my episode so got a bye on the return to work experience. I think if there is anything good that comes from experiencing what we have it’s discovering what and who is actually important. You have come far and done very well. You should be proud of yourself.
  13. Sherry, I’m glad you found us. You will find many helpful topics on this site. I know it has helped me a lot. I’m afraid it’s not possible to give you a direct answer for your question. We all react differently to this insult to our brain. I can tell you my experience, and you can read the experiences of many others on here. I encourage you do do that. Also you should visit the “Green Room”. It’s a friendly blog for members and a great place to get aquainted with some nice folks with lot’s of experience with the ups and downs of recovery.
  14. Paula, Sorry for your SAH. I hope you are taking it easy and hydrating. You can search this site for lot’s of helpful information about recovery. Please tell is how you happened to find Behind the Gray?
  15. Rosie, do you notice any odd syptoms when working head down? I think checking with your Dr would be a good idea. I had a nasah some time ago and was advised to return to normal activities. And I have. No problems, but I do not have a shunt, and had no surgery.
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