Jump to content
Search In
  • More options...
Find results that contain...
Find results in...

Hello!

By registering with us, you'll be able to view our forums in full as well as discuss, share and private message other members of Behind The Gray. Why not join us now?
Sign in to follow this  
Happydawn

Has anyone struggled to get back to work after SAH?

Recommended Posts

Me again, I think I returned to work too early but i did it because i thought it would make me feel normal !!! whatever that is !!! It didnt make me feel normal it just proved to me how sick i still was, as i could'nt manage it, it made me exhasted and put me backwards in my recovery. I can only see that now looking back:crazy: I stuck at it , it has got abit easier but still makes me very tired. I think these doctors should inform us just how exhasted we will be and that this will last for a long time , and is not likely that you would be able to return to work for aleast 6-12months and have their support with that.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Rhiann, I agree with you. The docs should better prepare us for the reality of it. I felt better 2 months after my NASAH than I do at 3 months. Based on everything I've read on here it's because I went back to work too early. I too wanted to feel normal. And... My neurologist told me I could return to my regular routine. Whatever! I'm tempted to buy a second copy of 'a dented image' and send it to him. :lol:

Sandi K.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi

I returned to work (NHS secretary)10 months post SAH. It was to be a phased return and the occupational health doc thought it could take up to 6 months to work up to my 35 hours. I was to start with 6 hours over 2 days and they were not to be consecutive, for the first 4 weeks. However, I was signed back off with work related stress 11 weeks later. Unfortunatley my office manager and supervisor put me under great pressure to return to 35 hours within 12 weeks of my return and ignored occupational health advice.

 

It took me another 4 months to recover from this stress but I went straight back into my 35 hours. I didn't go back to this office and I managed these hours fine and didn't crash when I came home. But I was to be redeployed because of things that had gone on, I've written about this before. I'd been working temporarily within Psychological Services and when a permanent post came up here I jumped at it! The hours for this job are 18 3/4, over 4 days and I'm loving it! Working with a consultant clinical psychologist as your line manager is just wonderful.

 

I feel I have the best of both worlds. I have a fab job, working with fab people and the hours give me lots of time off to do things I want. But I am aware that I am very luckly. My 3 children are now independent of us and I have never had any financial pressures on me to get back work.

 

I agree we should get more information on recovery. I was told not to think about my ususal routine until after 12 weeks. I took this as meaning that after 12 weeks I should be back at work or at least 'normal'! I was a bit taken aback when after 4 months I still wasn't ready to go back work! It wasn't until I found this site (7 months post SAH) that I realised it would be nearer a year before I should be thinking about getting back to my usual routine.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Sandi i think all neuro wards should have a copy of Dented image !!! When i finish mine im giving it to my GP :wink: Just to be told when we are discharged that this would be good reading for us would of helped !!!:crazy:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi Happy

Warm welcome to the site...

I'd say yes it gets easier as time passes by, at the moment your worlds turned upside down by whats happened to you.

A lot of people myself included found it very difficult but I have managed to make a better recovery than the health proffs thought.

Sometimes going to councelling can be a great help you not only speak to someone who knows what they're talkiing about but it help you understand yourself.maybe ask your GP about it.

Glad you found this site look forward to hearing more from you

take care.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This is a timely thread as I'm starting a phased return to work on Monday, 3 months since my craniotomy. I'll be doing 2 hours a day to start and building up to 37 over 12 weeks if I can.

 

I work for a very large IT company so fortunately can work from home during this period and for 4 out of 5 days once full time. I think it's achievable but I won't really know until I try. The rehab plan can be adjusted if I struggle so I'm really lucky in that respect.

 

If it was up to me I'd stay off longer but unfortunately there is a big round of redundancies coming soon and it may help my case to be seen to be on the road back to work.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
KelBel said:
Hiya

I went back to work 11 weeks after being coiled! I now cannot believe I went back so soon, but was being told at the time, by friends, family and my GP that I needed to get back to normal!?!... yeah ok…

My work were going to allow me to do a 2-week phased return ( :yikes: )

Week 1 – Mon to Fri 9 til 1

Week 2 – Mon to Fri 9 til 3

Week 3 – back to full time

I didn’t think that would be possible… what I did manage to talk them round to was;

Week 1 – Mon to Weds 9 til 1, Thurs & Fri holiday

Week 2 – Mon to Thurs 9 til 3, Fri holiday

Week 3 – Mon to Weds 9 til 5.15, Thurs & Fri holiday

Week 4 - Mon to Thurs 9 til 5.15, Fri holiday

I then continued to take a days holiday each week for a number of weeks.

 

I struggled with the full-time hours and had migraine aura daily, and had to sleep an hour or two once I got home before I could even think about cooking dinner etc…It took me about 7 months post SAH to get back to the gym too.

 

I also struggled with a difficult colleague for 2 months after my return to work. He was very difficult about my need to have the blinds shut, because of light sensitivity, as it ‘could’ make him depressed not having natural light. The fact that it was highly likely that I ‘would’ get a migraine with the blinds open and be unable to work at all didn’t click. It ended in a mediation meeting with 3 managers present, and didn’t really resolve anything. I had to try to keep some of the blinds open. Like that helps… (yes I am still bitter about it all, even though he has left the company!).

 

I did get a fit note from my GP ay the end of May to reduce my daily hours by 1 hr per day for the month of June, but it didn’t make that much difference, just to my pay! So I went back to full time…

I still struggle a little with doing everything, but I live alone and have no kids or animals so my flat doesn’t get too untidy (luckily).

Kel

HI

I had a lot of problems with the colleages I worked with. I thought they would be a little more acommodating, but no they just sniped all the time. I struggled with the flourescent lights and I would ask if we could switch them off as we had a lot of natural light from the window. As soon as I left the room to do something they switched them back on and moan.

 

I also struggled to walk and they reported me for taking my time at going to occup health for a blood pressure check. People are unbelievable. They continued bullying until I left as the stress and my health were struggling.I feel sorry for them as the are going nowhere stuck doing the same thing.

I'm enjoying doing my voluntry work as a EPP tutor and now Health Peer Mentor.

 

I have meet some wonderful people that have encouraged me to do more and I would not have met them if I had struggled on with work. I'm enjoying seeing people come back to life and they have been on the Expert Patient programme by NHS

Take Care

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
This is a timely thread as I'm starting a phased return to work on Monday, 3 months since my craniotomy. I'll be doing 2 hours a day to start and building up to 37 over 12 weeks if I can.

I work for a very large IT company so fortunately can work from home during this period and for 4 out of 5 days once full time. I think it's achievable but I won't really know until I try. The rehab plan can be adjusted if I struggle so I'm really lucky in that respect.

If it was up to me I'd stay off longer but unfortunately there is a big round of redundancies coming soon and it may help my case to be seen to be on the road back to work.

I hope you are successful in returning to work, but just make sure you health doesn't suffer. I like you couldn't wait to get back to work and also the financial side played on my mind.

Take it slowly as you can over do things at first and become really tired.

Let me know how you go on.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Lin-lin said:
I do not think it reflects negatively upon anyone if they have been unable to return to work. It is rather an acknowledgement of how our conditions make the workplace challenging.

I resigned from my job six months after my sah and commenced voluntary work at the CAB two months after that.

 

Voluntary work prepares a person for the workplace. Athletes don’t turn up for a race without any preparation and it is the same principle for a person who is off work. We need to build up our stamina and get ‘work fit.’

 

Next week, I commence further voluntary work with the Shaw Trust who are a charity who help people with incapacities/ disabilities return to work.

 

Giving up work and not returning to the same job, is not a weakness on my part. It is just me adapting to new circumstances. I look upon it as nothing more than that.

It is different for us who are not returning to the same job. In returning to the same job, an employer must make reasonable adjustments.

 

When searching for a job whilst suffering with a condition, we are competing against healthy people. Employers, by and large, prefer to employ healthy people, so it is all the more difficult.

It is for this reason that I am going to request help from the Shaw Trust. They are the ‘experts’ in dealing with sick/ disabled unemployed people. Their entire task is to find work for sick/ disabled people and help alleviate some of the difficulties we face.

 

I agree with Louise, who asked you not to beat yourself up about not returning to work.

Some people have returned to work quickly and how fantastic for them, but I do not compare myself with anyone.

 

Similarly with those who cannot return to work. I am pleased they have made the right decision for them and hope they have secured the quality of life they deserve.

After doing voluntary work for a while, you will have a better understanding of what you can and cannot do; and it will become clear whether paid work is realistic for you and if so, what type of work and hours.

 

It is a massive achievement that you have commenced voluntary work and what worthwhile projects you have chosen. In the short term, just try to maintain what you are doing, and in a few months, either increase or decrease your hours; see how you feel.

Lynne

Thankyou for being so positive

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Dawn, I've been wondering the same but was afraid to ask.

I'm still new, next week will be three months. I sure hope to get back full time but don't know if I'll ever juggle the same load again. My boss is offering to get me two assistants, one technical (I'm an I.T. Manager) and one to help with dispatch/schedules and budget. I'm very lucky. I'm just beginning to accept this whole thing and give up some control. I have to, I can't keep up. :shocked:

I'm part time right now and have applied for insurance benefits.

Sandi K.

HI, its great to hear that you will be getting help. Use the help as much as you can and don't over do it at first.

There are a lot of people who have been able to get back into work, but most are really tired at the end of the day. Pace yourself and get as much sleep as you can before going back.

You will enjoy getting back with friends.

I wish you well.

Let me know how things go.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
agnes m said:
I went back to work on rehab hours but felt like a fish out of water that was in May 2010. Still feel like a fish out of water so im back off at present. I used to work 37 hrs then after 3 months of rehab i changed to 30 but find that is too much because im so tired and crabbit. Its not easy and people dont understand.

When I first went back to work I was shocked as to how much work I did. Getting back into doing all these tasks was difficult. Keeping focused on things was difficult and when the phone rang I would say the first thing that came into my head. I would answer the call and mention the wrong depot. Then apologise and remember were I worked.lol

 

I struggled with lights and then epilepsy. I was finished on ill-health about a year from starting back.

I'm glad that I was as I just couldn't keep doing this job everyday as so tired.

I love my voluntary work with the EPP through the NHS and the Health Peer Mentoring with NHS

So don't beat yourself up like I used to do. It's only a job after all.

Take care

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I hope you are successful in returning to work, but just make sure you health doesn't suffer. I like you couldn't wait to get back to work and also the financial side played on my mind.

Take it slowly as you can over do things at first and become really tired.

Let me know how you go on.

Thank you Dawn, have just finished my first 2 hours which went well

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've been really interested in this thread, I think all who have managed to return to work deserve a massive WELL DONE and all who haven't deserve an even bigger WELL DONE for accepting how they are now.

 

I went back to work for 2 yrs & (as I put in earlier posts) I struggled so very badly to keep going & come home to look after my son and beat fatigue and keep going over and over again, day after day......

I have been on sick leave since September, my full pay ends in a few weeks & the financial worry is massive but I know I cannot do what I did and am still exhausted after all these months off. It is a massive decision weighing up financial needs against health needs and wanting my children to follow a good work ethic. I worry about being able to put the heating on and keep buying healthy food (which I am strict about ) after my pay stops.

 

I really admire LinLin for her amazing stance on her new circumstances and wish I could feel the same about the changes I'm facing - you have done amazingly well and now help others whatever course they choose. I worry too that having gone back to work for 2yrs I will struggle to prove how hard things have been and qualify for ESA.

 

I am also now going for epilepsy test next month & not allowed to drive in the mean time - really struggling with this as I need my time out at the beach with my dog (and with my son being poorly after shunt we have been trapped at home - I can't drive, he can't walk far....) it has really helped to look through posts on here and know we are not alone.

Michelle x

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Stuart, congratulations on your 2 hours! It does feel so good to contribute again! I really like how you are scheduling short hours and gradually working your way up slowly. You have a chance of success by taking it slow.

 

Dawn, u are right about it being nice to be back with friends at work. I don't think of my work colleagues as friends but there is definitely a social element to work. All the meetings, the planning, the oordinating, the joking, the sense of accomplishment, the rewards of a job well done. Not being able to perform at the same capacity is a huge blow to my big ego. Im meeting with Occ Health tomorrow and I plan to scale back even more. I jumped in too early and took on too much. And why wouldn't I? My neuro certainly didn't give me any warning.

 

Michelle, it must have been so hard during that two years of work. I bet you felt like all you did was work and sleep and work. Now that you are looking after your son and have that financial pressure in the back of your mind it must be stressful. Somehow we have to get to where Lynn is. So that we accept our abilities, respect our wants, and still be able to pay the bills!

Sandi K.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I had to quite my old job, i worked 50 to 70 hours a week, just can't do it after the sah, i used to be a landscaper for 14 years prior, i am going back to that, i can set my own hours etc. what gets me is the fatigue, just don't have the stamenia like i used to. I wish you the best, it takes time, i am at 8.5 months, and the headaches are finally going away, thank GOD for that!!!! The key is just do what you can, don't push yourself!!!! take care chris

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Stuart, congratulations on your 2 hours! It does feel so good to contribute again! I really like how you are scheduling short hours and gradually working your way up slowly. You have a chance of success by taking it slow.

Sandi K.

Thanks Sandi, my employers have their own Occ Health nurses and mine put my plan together with my manager and I.

What doesn't help is that I was outsourced whilst off so have come back to work for a new employer with all new systems etc so it's almost like starting a new job in a lot of respects.

Glad to hear you are taking things a bit easier and how good your employer sounds.

Stu

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well done to everyone on their positivity.

I took a while after my SAH to realise that I wouldn't be able to return to my profession as an Optometrist. I have ongoing visual problems, and some cognitive difficulties and I now know I wouldn't have coped with the responsibilities apart from everything else.

 

I was helped by the disability advisor at the Jobcentre to find a part-time job 8 months after SAH. We were all made redundant 10 months later. It then took 6 months to find a lovely part-time job as a receptionist at a golf centre. They took me on knowing my problems but recognised that I had plenty of positives to give to the job too.

 

I LOVE IT. I have had to take my work pension very early but it means I can manage. So be it, I am very happy to be here, to have a lovely understanding boss and work colleagues, and most of the time lovely golfers! I have been so used to working with the public for 30 years I missed it terribly before this job.

Although it was no choice of my own I think fate has thrown a new life and work at me. I'm a lucky girl. I have always been a glass half full type and think that is a great help at difficult times. I still get very tired at times and have learned to pace myself. We all have to be kind to ourselves.

 

Mostly people don't realise that I have post SAH problems, that can work both ways though, because we look back to normal they forget there are ongoing problems.

Good luck to everyone and hope you all have as happy an outcome.:smile5:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Good thread going here! I went back to work WAY too soon. The neuro surgeon told me I needed to stay home for at least a month, maybe longer. Neurologist told me, at 7 weeks, I could go back to work - see how it goes! So I did. I did go back slowly, a couple hours every other day. Did that for a few weeks then added more days and hours fairly quickly.

 

I'm a massage therapist and the constant leaning over and exerting pressure was doing me in. I felt ok as I was working, but would come home shattered, massive headaches and would sleep for hours. I was very emotional and became more depressed as I seemed to be digressing. About 2 months of that and our receptionist was fired and I took her position. Headaches got better and the fatigue also lessened somewhat. Increased my hours once again, but that proved to be too much as well. Using my brain, multitasking was almost harder than the physical work I'd been doing! Cut my hours back to about 20 a week and improvements were better.

 

Did this until end of Dec. when I was laid off! Now looking for another job - has been a struggle and I feel as though I've slipped backward once again. Confidence is not there, but I'm working on it. I no longer have health insurance and am not getting healthcare as needed! I am receiving unemployment comp. and this is a help, but am struggling financially, as many of us are. I know things will get better eventually and just have to keep at it.

 

The previous posts have been encouraging and well written. We can only do what we are able and must come to terms with it and move forward with what we are capable of, whatever that is! Our health must always come first. Good for all of us for the decisions we have made to stay well :-D

Carolyn

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I had to quite my old job, i worked 50 to 70 hours a week, just can't do it after the sah, i used to be a landscaper for 14 years prior, i am going back to that, i can set my own hours etc. what gets me is the fatigue, just don't have the stamenia like i used to. I wish you the best, it takes time, i am at 8.5 months, and the headaches are finally going away, thank GOD for that!!!! The key is just do what you can, don't push yourself!!!! take care chris

HI I think your right about fatigue, no-one warns you that it goes on for years to come. You can become more able as time goes by, but you still have to pace yourself as it creaps up on you.

I had a headache non stop for 5 months and it took two days to realise it had gone. I only drink de-caff drinks and I rarely have headache know.

Just take your time it's early days

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
winter said:

Good thread going here! I went back to work WAY too soon. The neuro surgeon told me I needed to stay home for at least a month, maybe longer. Neurologist told me, at 7 weeks, I could go back to work - see how it goes! So I did. I did go back slowly, a couple hours every other day. Did that for a few weeks then added more days and hours fairly quickly.

 

I'm a massage therapist and the constant leaning over and exerting pressure was doing me in. I felt ok as I was working, but would come home shattered, massive headaches and would sleep for hours. I was very emotional and became more depressed as I seemed to be digressing. About 2 months of that and our receptionist was fired and I took her position. Headaches got better and the fatigue also lessened somewhat. Increased my hours once again, but that proved to be too much as well. Using my brain, multitasking was almost harder than the physical work I'd been doing! Cut my hours back to about 20 a week and improvements were better.

 

Did this until end of Dec. when I was laid off! Now looking for another job - has been a struggle and I feel as though I've slipped backward once again. Confidence is not there, but I'm working on it. I no longer have health insurance and am not getting healthcare as needed! I am receiving unemployment comp. and this is a help, but am struggling financially, as many of us are. I know things will get better eventually and just have to keep at it.

 

The previous posts have been encouraging and well written. We can only do what we are able and must come to terms with it and move forward with what we are capable of, whatever that is! Our health must always come first. Good for all of us for the decisions we have made to stay well :-D

Carolyn

It seems that finance comes in the way of your health and its like walking a tight rope at times. I do hope that you can get a balance with work and finance.I know it can be a struggle at times:frown:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It took me a full year to get back to work. I work with care of the elderly which is very heavy and the ward that i work in is very fast paced.

 

I did'nt think that i would ever be able to return it. when time came for me to try and get back to work my employers were very hesitant on me going back into the wards But it was what i wanted. they offered to train me up for admin work, which would be lighter I asked them to give me a chance to try the ward again.

 

I was sent to occy health, numerous times and they agreed i could return but it would need to be a phased return and that i would only work 4 days a week. I dropped my hours to 25 doing 6 n a quarter hrs per day

 

I have managed to keep working, somedays i struggle if my shifts hectic, i'm tired and my head bangs,i try to slower the pace

I usually have to rest up when i get home

Take care x

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi all.

I returned to work, on a phased return, six months after my SAH.

In hindsight this was way too early. I was permanently tired, I was moody, irratable and snappy with a very short temper. It turns out I was suffering with Post Concussion Syndrom.

 

The SAh also brought about a need for a change in direction in regards to my work. To be frank, I needed a new job. After about six months back at work, I was offered redundancy (with really good terms) and took it. Things are gradually looking up for me, and i am looking for that elusive perfect job.

My advice would always be, take it slow and steady, listen to your body & instincts. And if things get too much, talk to your Dr.

 

Good luck, Dawn. And stay happy

Ern

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Angela said:

It took me a full year to get back to work. I work with care of the elderly which is very heavy and the ward that i work in is very fast paced.

 

I did'nt think that i would ever be able to return it. when time came for me to try and get back to work my employers were very hesitant on me going back into the wards But it was what i wanted. they offered to train me up for admin work, which would be lighter

I asked them to give me a chance to try the ward again.

 

I was sent to occy health, numerous times and they agreed i could return but it would need to be a phased return and that i would only work 4 days a week. I dropped my hours to 25 doing 6 n a quarter hrs per day

 

I have managed to keep working, somedays i struggle if my shifts hectic, i'm tired and my head bangs,i try to slower the pace

I usually have to rest up when i get home

Take care x

Well done for managing to return to work. Don't try and do too much.

Take Care

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I had my SAH in June and returned to work in October on a phased return until Christmas. I did not know if I was going to be able to cope with any work again let alone working full time!. I work on a front line social work team with children in the care system so It is quite a stressful job but it is a job that I love.

 

I thought I would try full-time in January and so far so good! A few headaches at first and a lot of fatigue but I am now back to full time dealing with everyday child protection as if I have never been away and luckily I have fantastic colleagues and managers who give me great support and time to recharge when I need to!!

Take Care

Vicky xx

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Restore formatting

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Sign in to follow this  

×
×
  • Create New...