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Karen

Do you know that a SAH is a type of Stroke?

Do you know that a SAH is a type of Stroke?  

90 members have voted

  1. 1. Do you know that a SAH is a type of Stroke?

    • Yes
      45
    • No
      22


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Do you know that a SAH is a type of Stroke?

It would be interesting to know as to how many members knew that a SAH is a Stroke? It's a question that occurs quite frequently on BTG.

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Hi Karen,

I didn't know this until over 2 years after my SAH when my 'aftercare' finally started! I attended an appointment and my medical file had *Stroke Patient* on it in big red letters. I didn't see this but was told about it on the journey home by the person who came with me. I went mad, screaming, swearing and adamant that I did NOT have a stroke.

Now that I know, I'm not sure why the word 'stroke' upset me so badly. Maybe it was the shock - I was still trying to get my head around 'SAH' at the time, that was scary enough and stroke was a step to far for me to deal with as well at that time :shocked:

I'm really interested to watch this poll as I wonder if I was in a minority of people who didn't realise SAH was classed as a stroke at the time when it happened to me?

Michelle x

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Hi Michelle,

I don't think that you will find that you're in the minority, probably just the opposite. I was 3 months into recovery when I found out via Wikipedia that a SAH was a type of stroke. It will be interesting to see how the poll goes. xx

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Hi guys,

My husband was told I'd had a stroke and had a SAH as soon as I was diagnosed.

Sounds like he and my family were lucky to be given all information early on.

They also had a meeting with and arranged by the neuro nurse specialist who went through everything with them.

Take care,

SarahLou Xx

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Hi Sarah Lou

Your husband was told you'd had a 'stroke' AND a 'SAH' as soon as you were diagnosed. That just makes it even more confusing for patients to understand which one they had if both are variables of the same diagnosis :crazy: It's good that he was given a diagnosis that left no doubt as to how serious the illness was early on. That needs to happen more often I think.

I was told that I'd had a bleed on my brain. My ex husband went to tell my mum & dad, my mum broke down as her sister had a SAH many years before so she understood the magnitude. I didn't - I only knew it was bad because the doctor started with the words 'I'm really sorry, Michelle, but you have had a bleed'.....My ex husband had left the hospital happy that there was a diagnosis & had no idea it was serious until he broke the news to my mum & saw her reaction. I had always understood that a STROKE was caused by a blood clot - to me, that would be the opposite of bleeding out?

I still don't properly understand the term 'vasospasm' which I know many on here have suffered after the initial bleed. Is that a stroke too? A clot? Or a further bleed? I know BOTH are the same i.e stroke but which does a vasospasm come under more accurately - a clot or a further bleed? Pfft, tired just trying to understand it all....

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To confuse matters even more my neurosurgeon said clearly 'you did not have a stroke'. But I had a brain bleed. :shocked::crazy: it wasn't until BTG that I began to understand hemorrhagic stroke.

I voted 'no' because I'm still confused by what the Neuro said. Maybe he confused me with another patient. :wink:

Sandi K.

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I thought that an sah and stroke were different. perhaps that explains why my speach seems to be getting worse when l am under any pressure. Sometime ago l went to my gp who referred me to a cranial psychologist. As l thought l was going backwards, unfortunately they said there was no hope of an appointment for many months and that they would contact me in the future.

I find it so hard to complain as l have escaped any physical damage except loss os balance and fatigue, l do find. terrific help from bhg even though most of my posts fail to get through, my gra daughter says it is because l read spam letters wrong. love to jt

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Found it!!

Sorry was going to post this yesterday.

As a User Carers Representative for Stroke, in my area.

As a group we have input into the way our Stroke Service is being run.

We work alongside our Stroke Team, offering Advocacy & Empathy.

I'm aware that SAH/Stroke has been in the "National Stroke Guidelines" since 2008 (maybe before)

So a little digging around, and pulling in a few other members knowledge, I've been forwarded this link:

Its from the latest edition of the "National Stroke Guidelines"

http://www.rcplondon.ac.uk/sites/default/files/national-clinical-guidelines-for-stroke-fourth-edition.pdf

Really hope this is of use.

STROKE GUIDELINES OUTSIDE THE UK, WILL BE DIFFERENT TO THESE.

PLEASE REFER TO YOU OWN NATIONAL STROKE GUIDELINES

FOR THE INFORMATION YOU REQUIRE ABOUT SAH

Edited by KeithH

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To confuse matters even more my neurosurgeon said clearly 'you did not have a stroke'. But I had a brain bleed. :shocked::crazy: it wasn't until BTG that I began to understand hemorrhagic stroke.

I voted 'no' because I'm still confused by what the Neuro said. Maybe he confused me with another patient. :wink:

Sandi K.

EXACTLY Sandi! My neurosurgeon keeps saying it was NOT A STROKE. But I had a stroke and a SAH by all I have read on my reports and what ALL my other Dr.s say. Maybe it is a term that neurosurgeons disagree with? Also maybe the term is diffferent fot them with us that had NASAH?

Edited by MaryB

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Copied from the guidelines from the RCP that Keith posted:

Stroke is defined as a clinical syndrome, of presumed vascular origin, typified by rapidly developing signs of focal or global disturbance of cerebral functions lasting more than 24 hours or leading to death (World Health Organization 1978 ). It affects between 174 and 216 people per 100,000 population in the UK each year (Mant et al 2004), and accounts for 11% of all deaths in England and Wales. It is accepted that 85% of strokes are due to cerebral infarction, 10% due to primary haemorrhage and 5% due to subarachnoid haemorrhage. The risk of recurrent stroke is 26% within 5 years of a first stroke and 39% by 10 years (Mohan et al 2011).

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Thank you Keith and Jen.

So what is my neuro thinking? Perhaps different philosophies on different continents. But the World Health Organization is mentioned. I had a hemorrhagic stroke, a subarachnoid hemorrhage with no known cause (NASAH), sometimes also called a 'brain bleed'.

Sandi K.

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Hello all, interesting info.

I was never told I had suffered a stroke.

I remember filling in a form, I am almost sure for the DVLA when I was to start driving again, and there was a separate box to tick for SAH which meant I did not have to tick the stroke box.

Happy 2013 to everyone.

One query which has no bearing on this, I am prone to jumping from one thing to another, By my name if I do reply to a thread etc it says new member and I have been looking on here nearly daily from the end of 2007. Don't want to be new anymore please. What do I have to do to be an old member!

Thanks very much Anne :-D

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I want to tick 'yes' because I do know that it's a type of stroke but that's info I learned here on btg and not from my doctor or John Radcliffe, so I guess the real answer is 'no'. Almost everything I know about sah has come from this site, I would have been lost without it!

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It was a good few months after my SAH I learned I had a stroke which is the only reason my CIC paid out it was classed a me having a stroke but the guidelines only say it is a stroke if it just happens ie my head went pop in work standing talkin to people !!! But if I had been hit on the head with something first then it wouldn't have been ????:confused:

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I never new I had a stroke, but I do now, l feel positive even though it's a stroke .

If we had SAH or Stroke we are here and fighting the good fight.

Do not get down so smile and sing and keep calm Wins orders xx

Oh poo poo ya had a stroke lol

Love to all

WinB143 xx xx Alias Win with the Anni removed xx

Welcome Annec xx

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I did not know it was a stroke either.

One thing that scares me from Jen's post is the liklihood of it recurring - is the same true for a SAH/Sroke?

Ever so slightly worried, Wem

Copied from Jen's post:

The risk of recurrent stroke is 26% within 5 years of a first stroke and 39% by 10 years (Mohan et al 2011).

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Wem

Keep calm and we will have this beaten, now head up and shoulders back and sing we beat it once so we can do it again.

Surgeon said to keep calm at all times. so keep calm and sing x

Love

WinB143 xx xx

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Wem, I asked my nurse about this risk previously and she indicated that SAH reoccurrences are very rare. The high risk is rebleeding at the time which is very dangerous. I think that figure applies to ischemic strokes mostly.

I'm sure someone who knows more will answer, I'm hoping Vanessa or Kris?

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Hi all:

If I could weigh in, well if I weighed in I would break the scale but it I think I read where an SAH is a 'form' of a stroke. But my docs never told me I had one. I think the reoccurence of an SAH is supposed to be very low they say.

I will say from from personal experience when I tell people I had a stroke, they roll their eyes and think oh so has everyone else. When I tell people I've had a brain hemorrhage, they fall out of their chair. SAH's are pretty rare as far as I know.

But some strokes can be minor and others very devastating. So confuses the heck outta me.

David

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Thanks for the reassuring replies. I've calmed down now.

Think the only answer is - think positively and get on with life.

On another note there is a beautifully kept small cemetry on the lane where I live. I have walked through this cemetry on many occasions over the last 16+ years and find it inspirational in a strange way. The ages of so many who have finished their journey in that cemetry is heartbreaking, but my visit yesterday really gave me a jolt. It was the grave of a young 9 month old toddler. The family had erected a Christmas tree and placed a Christmas card on her grave to mark their daughter's first Christmas. I am not asahmed to admit that I shed a tear and I felt extremely humbled by the experience.

Sorry for the morbidity of this, but it left me feeling I am so lucky and encouraged me to appreciate that others are going through far greater pain than me right now .

Take care all,

Wem

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Guys, don't ever be worried or panicked by the term or name "stroke", it's only a medical term at the end of the day....the same as a SAH is a medical term, as that's the area in the brain, where the bleed occurred.

A stroke is an interruption to the supply of blood to the brain, either by clot or bleed. The severity of a bleed is different with each patient case, as you can see from this site.

If you've had a SAH then you can be sure that when you had it, that the medics would have had a good look around your brain. Please don't be worried, as you're probably at less risk now, than the next man or woman sitting next to you on the bus or train, who hasn't been scanned. The likelihood of another SAH, from what I've been told, is extremely rare.

We've not lost one person on this site to another SAH and I've been running it for 7 years in July, so please don't panic! xx

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