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Karen

Do you know that a SAH is a type of Stroke?

Do you know that a SAH is a type of Stroke?  

90 members have voted

  1. 1. Do you know that a SAH is a type of Stroke?

    • Yes
      45
    • No
      22


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My neurosurgeon told me it was not a stroke.  He said if it had been a artery that had burst it would have been a stoke, but since it was a vein it was not.  While I didn't ask for more details at the time, I believe it to be because since arteries take blood to the brain, an artery injury would have starved the brain of oxygen.  However, since the vein is taking blood away from the brain, no disruption was there.  Just pressure on the brain.  So long as the pressure was relieved so that no part of the brain was damaged or died, no stroke??

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Well I would ask neurosurgeon aswell as my aneurysm was in an artery not a vein xxx

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My layman understanding is a stroke is the lack of oxygen reaching a part of the brain.  So maybe whether or not an SAH is a stroke depends on whether this happens??

 

IDK

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Yes its definitely a type of stroke, don't think it's anything to do with oxygen,  doctors told me.  

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I went to my Neurosurgeon today for my follow up.  I asked him specifically if all NASAH and SAH are strokes.  He said it depends on your definition.  He said in "layman" terms, any bleeding in the brain area is considered a stroke.  So most people would say that these are types of strokes.  However, in medical terms, a stroke is defined by bleeding in the brain, lack of oxygen to the brain, or other damage to brain cells. 

 

Since my NASAH distributed blood in the Sub Arachnoid area, which is on the surface of the brain, but not technically in the brain, he would not consider it a stroke by medical definition.  It can cause a stoke, if it damages the brain by cutting off oxygen or causing brain cells to die somehow.  I guess the only brain cells I had damaged were the ones that got poked by the EVD.

 

I guess it also matters that my SAH was not an artery carrying blood to the brain, but a vein carrying the blood away.  So medically speaking, I had a NASAH that was not a stroke.  But for us plain folks, I had a stroke in layman terms.

 

Those are his thoughts, other doctors may differ.  He said most people who have a SAH will tell people they had a form of stroke because saying they had a SAH requires definition, while "stroke" is already understood by most people.

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My understanding and that of my neurosurgeon, consultant and GP is that any disruption of blood flow / oxygen to the brain and especially that which causes any kind of paralysis is a stroke - ergo SAH / NASAH is a stroke.

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It is a stroke but I would kind of agree with what Chris G s neuro said.

 

We have about close to one million stroke per year in the US and about 200,000 SAH in the US.

 

I have been with this practice for almost 12 years. And I know my patients well.

We mostly see adults. And geriatrics. We have may be total of25 to 30 000 patients and very few patients have had SAH. But many have had a stroke. 

 

You should feel very lucky that you have survived a life changing event . I have only seen one lady who was having acute SAH only one time as a med student in Ireland many many years ago.

 

I still remember her having severe headache. 

I don’t know about other physicians but to me SAH is more serious than a stroke or mini stroke since stroke can have many degrees.

 

You are very lucky if you have survived a SAH. 

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Hi all,

When I had my NSAH I just knew...the stroke word was mentioned but it didn't seem real as my stroke was mild and I was only in the hospital for 3 days going home completely in tact...

 

When I had my vasospasm  not many days after going home and was recovering it was said to me often...ie "In a stroke like yours" ...so I became aware of what had happened at that point but did think the vasospasm was a 2nd stroke for a while...

 

I work in a small hospital and we often do learning on the computer...we recently did a stroke chapter and one answer to a question I just can't get by...the question was...all but one of these are a sign of stroke....answer...headache...now as the survivor of a NSAH my and perhaps some of you main symptom was a thunderclap headache...so I am led to believe that if there are hospitals that are educating their staff poorly about strokes more education...better education is needed...

 

I have taken this up with my institution but I am sure they are not alone..I am in the USA...

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To my mind there are three stages to  SAH

1) Cause

2) Treatment

3) Aftercare

 

What happens in most cases is a ruptured aneurysm - Why? We don't really know, and so we speculate ie poor diet, (alcohol, tobacco included), stress - which cannot be measured but is believed to be a factor in a lot of cases,  and various other things too.  We seem to lack concrete data on all of these things and more research is needed for sure.

 

Treatment, thankfully, is the best of the three categories above.  At least we are now able to save many patients who make it to hospital in time.

 

Aftercare is the biggest let down, for me at least.  Issues around returning to work, re-evaluating your life, re-learning life skills, relationship matters, dealing with abrupt change, looking at the 'new' you, how to deal with people who can't see your injury and think you are alright, and the rest..

 

That's where this site has proved invaluable to so many people.

 

After the clinical issues are resolved, that is where the authorities let go of the patient, and then the residual physical and mental issues kick in, with very little means of support, if any at all.  As usual, they trot out the lack of cash available line, but there are things they could do with minimal input. 

 

Setting up support groups, providing more information online for patients and their families, utilising the experiences of previous patients and the like. Providing information for carers and just letting people release their anxieties would be a huge step forward.

 

Step forward and take a bow BTG, currently filling a massive, massive, gap not catered for by the NHS.

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I've always believed that any interruption to the supply of blood to the brain, is a stroke. That includes a clot or a bleed on the brain.

 

Our deficits as to what we experience, will always be different ... as to what artery or what has been damaged by the bleed or even a clot. Every part of the brain is different, as to the area that it supplies and the affect that it has with our day to day life.

 

No size fits all and I doubt that you guys would be on this site, if you weren't experiencing problems.

 

Brain injury will always be individual and some of us suffer less and some suffer more mental and physical deficits .....  i'm still on a learning curve since starting the site in 2006, but I do know that talking about it and sharing your own experiences is something that you can't put a value on. xx

 

 

 

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Very true Karen. We are all individuals and the damage our brains have suffered is individual too. However i would like to thank you for providing this site where we can compare and support collectively. 

 

Thank-you

 

Clare xx

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Here in Baltimore for family med board review  thurs to Sunday except I don’t need to take the test till 2025. Just here for credits. 

We talked about SAH shortly, definitely a stroke and can have dizzy issues after awhile. Mostly middle aged patients and almost never in teens. There are about 550 students here and just glad to be here and not for the test taking. Have a good day everyone.

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I didn't know SHA was a type of Stroke until my husband's nurse told me. All we heard in the emergency room was the term "brain bleed". 

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The ER doctor told me I was having a stroke.  The trauma center doctor also confirmed it was a stroke but provided additional information specific to SAH. A surreal experience, especially for my family.

Dan

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