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Karen

Do you know that a SAH is a type of Stroke?

Do you know that a SAH is a type of Stroke?  

98 members have voted

  1. 1. Do you know that a SAH is a type of Stroke?

    • Yes
      45
    • No
      23


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Hmmm intrestin all the time I was in hospital the nurse's told me ' it was like a stroke ' but was in my brain

they never said I'd had a stroke in my brain

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Karen,

Thank you for the reassurance, I have managed to rationalise it now. Things would be so much easier if there was consistency in the communication from the medical teams.

Wem

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Wem, I couldn't agree more!

---------------------------

Once again, I viewed a UK TV programme today, called "This Morning" with Dr. Chris Steele and it was a health alert about stroke and it basically just covered a stroke caused by a clot and no mention of haemorrhagic stroke. Jeez, when are they ever going to get this right?

It's no wonder that a stroke caused by a bleed isn't diagnosed rapidly enough by GP's, especially in the UK and hence the mortality rate, as SAH is rarely mentioned on TV.

I had an appointment with my GP yesterday and feel that I (unfortunately, because of lack of information) know more about a SAH than he does and he was "quoting" straight out of his textbook....made me so flipping mad, but that's another story for a different time! :wink:

xx

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Luckily at the time I had a very good GP who admitted to me that she knew very little about SAH and that she had read up on it. If only all were so honest and diligent.

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Hello everyone

Happy 2013! hope this year is good - last year was rubbish!!

Just to clarify for people. A SAH is definitely a type of stroke. There are two basic types of stroke, haemorrhagic and ischaemic. A haemorrhagic stroke is one caused by bleeding in the brain. An ischaemic stroke is caused by a blood clot in the brain. 80% of strokes are ischaemic strokes.

A SAH is a type of haemorrhagic stroke (there's more than one type of haemorrhagic stroke).

 

SAH has the highest death rate of any stroke, so well done to us all for surviving! However, the good news is that the recurrence rate is low. Not sure of exact figures, but very low percentage. That is good news. The risk of recurrence is rather higher for other types of stroke.

For those people including myself with small current untreated aneurysms, these are usually monitored with MRI scanning thus keeping the incidence of another bleed very low indeed. Also people who have been coiled/clipped are usually monitored to check for new aneurysm formation, again keeping the risks very low.

Hope that helps

Vanessa

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I'm curious if you folks in the UK have heard the term 'brain attack'? Did I read it here or somewhere else?

Just as there are many types of heart attack there are different types of strokes so some people have begun referring to it as a brain attack. I don't think it's catching on though?

Sandi K.

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Today in the US, Dr. OZ a cardiologist had on Dr . Sanjay Gupta the neurosurgeon that does CNN health reports on his show. They were talking about strokes and the rise of them in young woman. He never mentioned SAH but someone had a thunderclap headache and vomiting, worst headache of life and he had a few others on stage.

One thing he talked about which we have talked about in here is not puttting your head in that beauty shop hair washing position. Interesting show but I wish he would of talked more about them and different types etc... I had my SAH the day after I had a tooh pulled but if was just waiting to happen no fault anywhere there.

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While in the hospital, I was told by the neurosurgeon that I'd had a SAH - brain bleed. Didn't mention stroke at first. Several days after the coiling, and numerous tests, I was told I'd had a little stroke caused by vasospasm after the coiling. So, I thought ok, I've had a brain bleed AND a little stroke. The little stroke (which I learned from my insurance company) was an ischemic stroke, the SAH - hemorrhagic stroke. So in all, I had 2 strokes.

The dr. didn't explain to me that the sah, was indeed, a stroke!

 

Like several others here, I was shocked that not only did I have the little ischemic stroke after the sah, but that the sah was also a type of stroke!

When I was finally able to get on computer and really comprehend things, I googled the different types of strokes and then found BTG - which is where I really got a better understanding of things and what was happening with me. Where would I be without BTG!!!

 

It's extremely aggrivating and unfortunate that most of us had little to no knowledge of what had even ocurred to us, let alone being sent home with no real information about what to expect. Still shaking my head that this is continuing to happen with folks. There are just no good excuses that I can find to explain the ignorance of the medical community!!! Infuriating :frown:

 

Thank you, Karen, for this most excellent site for all of us to come to for support, help and information!

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There are indeed 2 types of stroke, ischemic which is a blood clot or even a vasospasm which restricts blood & oxygen to the brain. I had vasospasms on 3 different occasions, once during, once after & once a week after my op. If you have a bleed from an sah its a haemorrhagic stroke (sp). I know my Dad had a bleed & my mum had an ischenic stroke when a blood clot from the site of a major op moved into her brain.

 

I've never had it described as a stroke to me but I know vasospasms caused a weakness in my left side & are responsible for the fatigue issues I have. As I didn't have a bleed I def didn't have an haemorrhagic stroke but if I had then i wouldn't be here now.

It is very confusing but a bleed is a stroke SAH or NASAH in my world

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I know it's a kind of stroke, but my neurologist has told me more than once "You did not have a stroke. They aren't the same thing." Uh well you may want to let others know that because it is according to the medical journals!

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It is my understanding that SAH can lead to stroke, but is often classified with stroke for convenience/convention.

Stroke is when brain cells die due to an inadequate blood flow.

 

If you had an aneurysm, you had an inadequate blood flow to all the cells to which the burst artery could no longer supply nutrients.

If you had no aneurysm, (ie burst vein) then there was no disruption of flow to brain cells (that's arterial), but there may still have been poisoning of cells right around where the blood was found.

 

I personally had no known cause for my SAH, but that doesn't mean that there was no aneurysm...or it could have been a small undetectable malformation etc.. Because I had initially gotten a diagnosis of perimesencephalic, that's what I thought I was, but reading my actual surgeons notes, he called me diffuse SAH with most of the hemorrhage concentrated in the perimesencephalic region. This is a diagnosis that doesn't explain the cause either way. I have come to believe that flow goes from high to low pressure therefore it makes the most sense that the SAH occurred under highest pressure conditions...that's artery. The rest is semantics.

 

The question really is do we want to define what happened to us by a diagnosis or by our brain behaviors. I wanted so bad to just be perimesencephalic as they have the best outcomes and never look back, but I am not and may have actual brain damage. I hated being told that I didn't stroke. How do they know!? They'd know by monitoring me years later to see if I still have deficits. I do now at 11/2 years.

~Kris

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Kris, I had a perimesencaphalic bleed so I'm encouraged by what you write but I'm still waiting to stop looking back. That will be a good day when I'm symptom free and no longer recovering. Not sure if that's what you meant?

Your detailed explanation of why we aren't considered to have had a stroke seems reasonable. I'm not sure that it explains my ongoing symptoms or deficits though. It's all very complicated.

Sandi K.

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It is my understanding that SAH can lead to stroke, but is often classified with stroke for convenience/convention.

Stroke is when brain cells die due to an inadequate blood flow.

If you had an aneurysm, you had an inadequate blood flow to all the cells to which the burst artery could no longer supply nutrients.

If you had no aneurysm, (ie burst vein) then there was no disruption of flow to brain cells (that's arterial), but there may still have been poisoning of cells right around where the blood was found. monitoring me years later to see if I still have deficits. I do now at 11/2 years.

~Kris

Hi Kris, your explanation of 'stroke/not a stroke' would not make sense to me at all, as, after struggling to accept that I had had a 'stroke' at all for many years I now understand that if the inadequate blood flow to cells was caused by a clot (rather than a burst) the lack of blood flow is surely the same as a bleed anywhere in your brain?

Also, any bleed within your skull which puts crush pressure on the brain or the natural 'flow' of any blood passages, which in turn would interrupt the blood flow & kill off cells is therefore a 'stroke'????

Far too deep for me to understand the technicalities BUT it's clear from 'talking' to others on here and reading their stories that the cause of the damage is kind of irrelevant when you consider the long term, shared effects suffered by all, including real life experiences of other causes of brain injuries (TBI as opposed to ABI). There are so many similarities despite the cause of the initial damage.

Michelle

Edited by goldfish.girl

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I learned I had a Stroke (I still have a hard time saying that word) the day they were releasing me from the the hospital. I was assigned a Nurse Practicioner that I could call on if I had an questions and her business card said "Stroke Nurse". When I went to see her a couple of weeks later I asked if they define my case as a stroke and she informed me that yes, a SAH is a stroke.

A clot stroke takes longer to develop and hence they often see the symptoms over a matter of time. The clot stroke though is killing brain cells during that time and often those cells can not recover as easily. A clot stroke is more likely to cause a lot more long term damage. A SAH happens suddenly (or at least more quickly) and the effects are immediate. However the damage done to the brain cells is less than that of a clot stroke.

Many similarities, but brain tissue is damaged by the blood poisonig the tissue. Overall both are bad because the survival rate for a clot stroke is much higher than a SAH (if caught early), however if you survive the SAH you are more likely to make a better recovery.

Just the information I received, but interesting none the less.

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Do you know that a SAH is a type of Stroke?

It would be interesting to know as to how many members knew that a SAH is a Stroke? It's a question that occurs quite frequently on BTG.

I was told by my neuro-surgeon at jefferson university hospital in philadelphia pa usa that sah is not a stroke.I believe him and the fantastic nursing staff as well.We are so blessed to be here and givin in life how some say pattato and some say poetatto and some say tomato and some say toemato well its a question of interpretation.Hope you all are having a great day feeling better as each day passes.Danny

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It is my understanding that A stroke is the sudden death of brain cells in a localized area due to inadequate blood flow.

A clot can restrict the flow and kill the supply, A bleed can divert the flow of oxygen and also cut off the supply.

Compounding that can be a pooling of the blood within the CSF causing pressure on parts of the brain also restricting the flow.

I am quite aware that my brain was damaged by the bleed I had. No aneurysm but a definite bleed.

I would defy anyone to tell me that there was no damage to various parts of my brain.

I guess the point is, it doesn't matter what anyone calls it, we still suffer from the effects of the bleed.

I do call it a stroke. :) so does my doctor. The neurosurgeon only saw me for the angiogram. and I have seen no specialists since then, so I guess the world has to take my word for it.

if anyone asks tell them Carl said!

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Hi there

I was told that I was given a medically-induced stroke as part of my treatment for an aneurysm. Much later I discovered that I'd had an SAH. I didn't have risk factors for stroke; at the rehab hospital I was sent to the NZ Stroke Foundation representative kept coming to see me and I kept sending her packing! It was very upsetting that everyone thought I'd had a stroke, not an SAH. The stroke was just a part of what I had to deal with. So I can sympathise with others being upset! I was taking good care of myself etc etc.

I was later told that I had a weird birthmark on my brain, and this caused the aneurysm and hence the first brain bleed. My initial severe headache was diagnosed as migraine - I gather this is not uncommon, either. Ah well. thankfully my husband got me to hospital when I became unconscious, and I'm still alive to tell the tale! I look forward to continuing healing!

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Read some of it Keith was interesting as my stay in hospital never followed procedures mentioned.

Left sitting when I was not well to be left, cathater etc etc . hmmm better read more.

Love

WinB143 xx xx

Edited by Winb143

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When the ambulance came for me, they did the FAST, face Arms, speech etc. I passed all of it, no problem so they didn't think I 'd had a stroke. Then when I was in hospital they told me I hadn't had a stroke, just a small bleed. Then they told me it was a stroke (rupture of an artery wall), the haemorrhagic kind as opposed to the ischaemic kind (clotting). Either way it still had a profound effect on my life - and it seems it is more generally accepted now that it is a form of stroke - just a lesser known kind than the usual kind! we need to get the message out there!

To be a stroke or not to be a stroke, that is the question! I can feel my literary genes coming on! Maybe I should write a play!!

Stay as well as you can everyone

Macca

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I was told by a consultant that there are three types of stroke - haemorrhage, clot and narrowing of arteries which deprives the brain of blood supply. The point was also made that these are the three menaces on the heart. So, a heart attack can be a clot, stricture/narrowing of the arteries and finally a haemorrhage often typified by a ruptured aorta or something similar. I'm not an expert but this all seems logical to me.

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I am in the U S (Arkansas) and am told that I have really top rate neurologists. I was told I had a "bleed" and the vasospasms could result in stroke type damage if not managed properly. I suppose any event that starves brain tissue of blood/oxygen that results in damage could rightfully be considered a stroke. I voted no due to the information I had been given by my Dr's.

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All I remember, I had 3 neurologists monitoring me when I was in the hospital...the neurosurgeon -from South Africa, and 2 top neuros in the west coast (US) region, supposedly lol. My mum was told that I had a stroke in the emergency room, my 4th day in I was told that I had SAH.

I will echo Macca, "To be a stroke or not to be a stroke, that is the question!" (hello there buddy)

to all, hope all is well...

Ryan

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I didn't know the SAH was a type of stroke until BTG either. I know I had stroke like symptoms so I guess it only makes sense. I know I had 2 subsequent strokes as a result of the surgery and repair. Aside from the head pain it is the stroke damage that I am recovering from more than anything else. I am recovering well though, my better half calls me a walking miracle. She showed me pics of me in NICU and I can't believe that was me looking like a bloated mannequin on life support. I'm truly blessed.

Thanks for all the info,

Bill C

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