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SAH - informing the DVLA (UK only]


Daffodil
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You must tell DVLA if you have a driving licence and:

  • you develop a ‘notifiable’ medical condition or disability
  • a condition or disability has got worse since you got your licence

 

Notifiable conditions are anything that could affect your ability to drive safely. They can include:

  • epilepsy
  • strokes
  • other neurological and mental health conditions
  • physical disabilities
  • visual impairments

 

SAH is listed by DVLA as a notifiable condition but it does not automatically mean a revoke of license.

 

You should also tell your insurance company about your condition or future claims may be invalid. Driving against medical advice may also invalidate your insurance.

 

If you are in any doubt as to whether you should drive or not, you should contact the DVLA (see the links below) or ask your doctor.

 

NASAH is not listed as a notifiable condition but some doctors will insist on a report to DVLA. 

 

Most SAH survivors are advised they can get back to Driving once they are well enough to do so and they are considered to have clinically recovered. 

 

A license is typically only revoked post SAH if there has been invasive brain surgery e.g for an extraventricular drain (EVD) , Shunt, or a epilepsy developed since the event or if there are visual of physical defecits which means you are not safe to drive.

 

Typically for lasting physical and visual defecits you will be asked to attend an assessment or have a doctor/ consultant provide proof of fitness to drive. 

 

In most cases in the U.K. people can return to Driving once their treating doctor deems they are fit to do so.

 

The exception is for those who hold a license for driving HGV and buses . They must notify DVLA immediately and are likely to see a revoke of that part of their license.

 

Link to current DVLA position

https://www.gov.uk/driving-medical-conditions

 

Guidance to medical professionals

https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/670819/assessing-fitness-to-drive-a-guide-for-medical-professionals.pdf ( note, this lists the current guidance for SAH and NASAH but if you have a VP shunt or an EVD placed or developed epilepsy then you need to read those sections too and often this means 6 months minimum revoke of license. ) 

 

This information applies to the UK only. The procedure in countries other than the UK may be different.

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  • 9 months later...

Thanks for sharing this Cel, good to see that DVLA have actually made it a little clearer which circumstances mean what Impact than it was previously and used to be hidden in lots of doctors guidance notes. I wonder if has come after Headway petitioned them on this....

 

as far as I read it the main point remains which that Most SAH survivors can expect to be able to return to driving once their doctor deems it safe to do so. 

 

This summary I wrote I think still applies: 

On 01/05/2018 at 15:10, Daffodil said:

 

Most SAH survivors are advised they can get back to Driving once they are well enough to do so and they are considered to have clinically recovered. 

 

A license is typically only revoked post SAH if there has been invasive brain surgery e.g for an extraventricular drain (EVD) , Shunt, or a epilepsy developed since the event or if there are visual of physical defecits which means you are not safe to drive.

 

Typically for lasting physical and visual defecits you will be asked to attend an assessment or have a doctor/ consultant provide proof of fitness to drive. 

 

In most cases in the U.K. people can return to Driving once their treating doctor deems they are fit to do so.

 

The exception is for those who hold a license for driving HGV and buses . They must notify DVLA immediately and are likely to see a revoke of that part of their license.

 

So I think you need to see your doctor first and confirm ‘clinically you are cleared to drive’ but no longer it seems do you have to notify DVLA unless you have a Shunt, surgery or interestingly a  Non aneurysmal SAH which you ‘Will need clinical confirmation of recovery and, if no other cause has been identified, a documented normal cerebral angiogram.’ 

 

Be good if you can share any advice here if you do decide speak to DVLA anyway.

thanks 

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