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Margaret

Work and health professionals

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Hi everybody. I have reached out to a couple of you regarding work and recovery from nsah.

 

I am 5 years out and would really like to renter the workforce as a health professional because I love it and feel like it’s either time to try or change it up. I need to work for financial purposes.

 

 My job requires call and at times long hours and I’m really frightened in some ways to go back. Yet, I am also really excited about it and hope it’s not too much. I have been doing it part time then per diem since the event.

 

My question is does anybody work full time in the health profession anymore after a nsah? Am I fooling myself or is this possible? Of course, I know it’s per individual but I’d love to hear an inspiring story if there is one- or just the truth! Thank you so very much! 

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Hi Margaret

 

I work as a health professional for the UK NHS. I moved into this employment after my NASAH 4 years ago, as working in community was too stressful.

 

I have never worked full time hours since my bleed, I think I would find it very hard. I started back doing 34 hours a week and currently do 30 hours a week over 4 days with a day off mid week as a recovery day. I am currently contemplating dropping another day......

 

In answer to your question does anybody work full time in the health profession after a NASAH - I don't know. I have been told that not many people return to full time work post bleed which I find hard to believe. However, in my experience,  and I have made a good recovery, I think it is hard. 

 

Long hours may not be your best friend, how many hours at a time have you been doing so far? You would need to factor in regular breaks and a good work schedule which allows recovery. 

 

I hope you manage to come to an acceptable plan with your employer, keep us posted!

 

Clare xx

 

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Thanks for your response Clare. I work 8 hour shifts at this point. I have done 10-12 hours and do feel tired- who wouldn’t? Yet I typically have days off after so I don’t really know what it would be like consecutively.  Most of the time I would be 8 hour days but with call you just never know. I am in a highly specialized concentration so I can’t just do something else within it.

 

I’m 44 years old with lots of ambition. I’m at a crossroad it seems. I can’t tell if my fears are substantiated due to limitations or if I’m just plain scared. Tricky tricky! Thanks again for your response. I greatly appreciate it. 

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Hi Margaret,

 

I am not and never was a health professional. However I did work in a large Government department. 

 

I went back to work on a phased return after 6 months. It was unbelievably hard and involved me looking after up to 20 staff and travelling the length and breadth of the UK.  I was utterly sick of the M1 and the M6.  I managed to hang on in there for the next four years and then I took early retirement at 58.

 

The vast, vast majority of my colleagues were great. 

 

That said I left with my head held high, my dignity in tact and can say it was the best decision I ever made.   I paid off my mortgage.  Making a few lifestyle changes and not having to pay out for travel and parking, meals and so on meant I hardly noticed the difference in my income and my life now is infinitely better than when I was in work.  I still have a number of friends from work with whom I am still in touch and meet up with and some of them are retired now also. I've been gone 5 years now.

 

What I am trying to say is 'there is life after work' and it's great - I wish I had done it earlier.  

 

Good luck - whatever you decide, I wish you well. 

 

Macca

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Thanks Macca and I’m very happy for you. I wish this happened at a later age for me but at 39 and now 44 I am forced to work. I have a kid and college will happen for him in just 9 years from now. Also- I am looking at working another 20 years before I have money to retire.

 

I have been slowly reintegrating and have had time to appreciate the non work aspects of life and I am grateful for that time. I truly appreciate hearing about your story! Thank you so very much! Keep on enjoying that beautiful gift. Margaret 

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You're welcome Margaret.  Even if you need to work, there are still adjustments you can make to improve your work/life balance, ie changing jobs, changing work patterns, reducing hours, delegating etc

 

I wish you well whatever you decide!

 

Macca

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Hi Margaret.

there are a few doctors who have come through forum and whom I believe are back working. I’ll try and findlink to that thread but also do think that you probably do know where your limits are now and that’s not to say they won’t continue to change, they will , but equally if you feel ready then I personally would say lean in and try but be honest with yourself. 

 

Like you i was 39 when I had my SAH and later got a Shunt placed so things are permanently clunky with my Head these days , but that said I wanted to know what was possible, what this reformatted brain could do and where my new limits lie.

 

I do a complex job, lots of analysis , detail and negotiation and work part time  half day mon- Friday plus looking after two teens and importantly balancing my rest and my interests. I don’t socialise much these days as the late nights disagree but when I do work full days which often means travel into London too then I struggle the next day still.

 

I am 7.5 yrs out but know I get huge purpose from my work , ( the wage is Important too for our household) and equally my employer get good value from me. Ego wise I would still like to think I could go full time again but my Neuro folk agree it’s a marvel I do what I do now and I think it’s unlikely I ever will. 

 

Balance is the most important I think. Work, money , we know that’s pretty essential but equally health and ability to enjoy time outside work is very crucial too. I say dont be boxed in by conformity to the norms, be disruptive and design what works for you, work is changing, sounds like you have a specialised skill so me thinks people may be happy to work around that and find news ways to satisfy that ambition streak ...you may be surprised. 

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Thank you so much daffodil! Your words offer great advice and caring support. All of you are amazing- thank you!! I guess I’ll keep going and see where it takes me. Will keep you posted! For now there’s hope- cherish the desire with anticipation. I love that definition. So true! Thanks, Margaret 

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