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In reply to Andyp from "Introduce Yourself"


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Hi Andy! I thought I'd put this here instead of the other thread so as to not hijack Jen's welcome. :)

You had asked if my medical backround affected my perception of the SAH. It did in some ways, but I come from a pediatric backround and specifically have specialized in diabetes education, so I was totally out of my depth as a nurse. When the bleed was actually happening I went into denial. Looking back, I could have recognized the signs as a stroke or some other brain issue, but at the time I was convinced that my neck had gone out. 8O Even in the first ER when the doctor said he was guessing it was either a migraine or an intercranial bleed, I was telling my fiancee that I was sure it wasn't a bleed.

Once in the hospital, all the nurses passed on in report that I was also a nurse and I think I was treated with the medical respect of one nurse to another. They all explained things in medical terms to me, with the sort of unattached, brief, and specific details that I would get in report. I appreciated it.

On a more personal note, I found it fairly easy to adapt to hospital life and live in the moment while I was there. A friend who is also in the medical field was talking with my fiancee about hospitals and he put it best--my beloved was talking about how intimidating the hospital is and how he was worried about me handling it when there wasn't anyone else with me, like at night. Our friend reminded him that he and I both were "forged in the fire of hospitals" and that the routines and people and procedures weren't strange to us. It was pretty easy to just integrate into the hospital while I was there. I had more trouble integrating back home, out of the security of being surrounded by nurses and all.

Anyway, what does your wife do? Anyone else in the medical field?

Love!

Ember

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hi Ember thanks for that-my wife works on ICU so she knew the likely scenario that I was in.

I understand what you mean about the security of being in hospital as a patient-I think I could have become used to the regime and even being institutionalised under the circumstances at the time!

Are you in the UK?

best wishes

Andy P

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Hi Ember,

I am also in the medical field. I am an Independent Duty Medical Technichian in the Air Force. I am trained to work like a PA, I see patients under the gudiance of a physicain, but only for acute medicine. I also am trained in public health and bio health.

Like you, I was in denial when I had my bleed. When my symptoms started, I kept thinking deep down "I think I am having a stroke", but I kept saying no way not me. My husband told me that when the ER doc came in and told us that I had a bleed. I sat up in the bed and said "Excuse me. Who are you talking about." As a medical profession you never think that something like this will ever happen to you.

I hope that you are having a good day.

Jen

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Hey Karen,

My weekend is still going on with a small housewarming and celebration of life and love at our home tonight. :) I have really enjoyed myself and feel back in my center spiritually and really embraced by my community. I spent most of the all-nighter bundled up in six layers of warm clothes and blankets, snuggled into a reclining camp chair and watching all the beauty going on around me. I slept on and off and really didn't move around much at all.

I actually became quite sick near sunrise though. 8O I think I did not get enough real sleep during the night and although I didn't get a headache, I got sick. I vomited several times before I got home and once there I discovered that my insulin pump had become disconnected and my diabetes was completely out of control. After the first time of being sick though, my blood sugar was normal, so the disconnect must have happened between then and when we left. Vomiting makes high blood sugar very much worse, and very high blood sugar causes vomiting, so the two issues got tangled up together I think. Anyway, other than that I had a fabulous time and I'm very glad that I went. Yesterday was spent drinking tons of fluid and sleeping, so I'm all better now. :)

I see my neurosurgeon tomorrow and maybe she will tell me I can drive!

Love!

Ember

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Hi Ember,

You sound happy, glad that the weekend was a success!

At least you know what caused the vomiting...would imagine that it left you feeling pretty weak.

Good luck with the Neurosurgeon.....hope that it's good news about the driving! :)

Love K x

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Hi Amber

Well-Obviously she had no choice and had to go with the flow.

I think she struggled earlier-thinking about having me at home for 3 months..we did get on better..but i really relied on her a lot and became a bit child like at times.

I think 6-9 months later the shock hit her more!

I am still not the same person..i guess the experience changes you-but I am working through things still!

Best wishes

Andy P

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Hi guys! Haven't talked to you all for a while. I hear you Andy about the 6-9 month mark hitting you hard. Also the one year mark for me. During both of those times the SAH was much more foremost on my mind. I kept asking Jack to describe things that had happened.

Also, I'd like to ask about the water intake that everyone keeps mentioning. Other than the usual health advice that it's good for everyone, is there a reason specific to SAH to be taking in more water??? No docs mentioned it to me.

Thanks for your replies!

A

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I notice that if I am not drinking enough water my headaches and fatigue are worse. I try for 2 liters a day but often hit about 1 1/2 liters plus other liquids like herbal tea and diet (caffeine free) sodas.

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Hi Annie-I only remember this being an issue when in hospital-3.5 litres a day was what they said otherwise it would mean going back on a drip.

I don't notice much in the way of headaches related to a lack of water..but I am sure drinking plenty (within reason) is always beneficial to the whole.

By the way my second anniversary of the SAH is on the 7th Nov..another milestone!!!!

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Hi

Apparently the intake of two to three litres of water a day aids the blood flow around the body and therefore eases headaches. Dehydration causes the muscles in the scalp to contract which, in effect, is what causes headaches. I definitely notice if I haven't had at least two litres a day of non-caffeine fluid and if I have a coffee I always compensate with an extra glass of water - the same if I've had alcohol - I'll have a couple and then a soft drink or water.

I'm getting through so much cordial I'm sure Robinson's profits will be up by 50% this year!!!

Catch you later

Sami xxx

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Hi,

My reasons are the same as Sami's for keeping up the fluids.....re: dehydration/headache.....although, excessive water intake can wash away the minerals and salts in the body.....so it's finding the right balance and not taking it to extremes....like most things in life! :lol:

Love K x

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