Jump to content

Skippy

Administrators
  • Posts

    6,451
  • Joined

  • Last visited

  • Days Won

    84

Skippy last won the day on May 12

Skippy had the most liked content!

Reputation

15,802 Excellent

2 Followers

About Skippy

  • Birthday 15/04/1971

Profile Information

  • Gender
    Female
  • Location
    Nottingham
  • Interests
    Liverpool FC, MotoGP, Reading, Gardening

Converted

  • Biography
    Happily married to a wonderful man, have an amazing, beautiful 21 year old daughter and a gorgeous Springer Spaniel called Buddy
  • Location
    Nottingham
  • Interests
    Liverpool FC, MotoGP (Valentino Rossi), Music, Reading and Football (Liverpool)
  • Occupation
    Administration Officer
  • SAH/Stroke Date
    25/08/06 Right Posterior Com Artery

Recent Profile Visitors

1,984 profile views
  1. Hi Josie I was constantly worried about it happening again -as I approach 15 years post SAH, I'm at the point where I have stopped worrying about anything that I can't control. My irritability and being cross about everything is down to being menopausal; so am taking tablets to try to realign my hormones and, therefore hopefully, my emotions. Have you had a chat with your GP about how you're feeling? You never know, they could recommend something. Take care xx
  2. Hi there Please express to your "specialist" that it IS possible to have a brain bleed without an aneurysm - even direct him to this site so that he can see for himself! You never know, he might learn something. Failing that, get a second opinion from someone who doesn't apparently have a "God Complex"!!! Please, please stay strong. I know this can be very upsetting, scary and frustrating for you - read the Forum Thread NASAH and take heart from the experiences on there. You must also try to do something about the work situation - have you tried talking to your employer about your situation? I'm not sure if you have the same provisions in Poland as in the UK, where we are entitled to Statutory Sick Pay if we're working - not completely sure what the pay is in relation to your actual earnings, but it would be better than nothing if it helps your recovery. Your and your health are the most important things right now, don't stop badgering anyone until someone listens to you. Most importantly, remember, you are not alone! We are here to support you in everyway we can - if you want to pour out your feelings then feel free to do so, we are a support group and that's our speciality
  3. Daniel - Daff has hit every nail squarely on the head my friend!
  4. Hi Karissa and welcome to BTG Before you resume any kind of exercise please check with your own GP / Specialist as we cannot give medical advice here; and this includes advice as to when / how to resume any form of exercise after SAH. Acceptance about what has happened and accepting the "new" you is a difficult one. I liken my recovery almost like the stages of grief: - denial, anger, bargaining, depression, and acceptance. And as you can see, acceptance is last - and I think I even skipped denial and went straight for anger!!! You will need time to process what has happened before you can even begin to accept it. This site holds a wealth of information and experience and has been a god send for many - me included. There are many people here who will help you on your journey and aid the navigation of the minefield of emotions that come with it. Take care
  5. Hi Dan To be honest I was like you - impatient, frustrated, scared, angry etc and it probably took me until my first anni-versary to accept the new me. I still can't exercise the way I used to as I can't bear the vibrations I feel in my head from high intensity exercise. I still hate this part of the new me. Acceptance to the new us is a very individual process and we all accept in different ways at different times - be patient with yourself and don't beat yourself up about this.
  6. Fantastic news Kerry!! Enjoy the open road xx
  7. Hahahaha yes, I have to admit, I was cheering and jumping up and down knowing that I can comfortably write this season off and know that we'll do better all round next season. Regarding your screen tolerance. I have worked on screens all day every day for most of my adult life. When we ran our design agency I would proof read 30 language leaflets and check quiet areas and codes were correctly placed on artworks - all on screen. Post SAH I can't proof read anything on screen and have to print it off to check it. My screen time itself has not been affected at all and working in a busy school office - everything from registers, to payments, to records are all done electronically and I am "on screen" from 8am til 4pm every day with a half hour dinner break. Watching television has not been an issue and I find it more relaxing and easier to cope with than a room full of people all talking at the same time. Three months after my SAH I went to an all singing, all dancing P!nk concert and enjoyed every minute - I just craved the normality and, although I was shattered after it, it gave me a boost because I managed it.
  8. Yes I have seen my scans and was allowed to take a picture of the one shown to me on screen. Not sure they allow that now. You can request them from your hospital on a DVD but there is a charge. Mine clearly shows the location and if you zoom in, you can see the coils within the aneurysm - looks a bit like a brillo pad to be honest!! Fingers crossed for tomorrow afternoon against Palace 🤞
  9. And I'm sure you'll recover quicker than we did in leaving the massive gaps between winning the league and the European championships. I blame being a Liverpool supporter for a lot of my stress and euphoria in equal measure. But as with me - gone are glory days of the 80s!!
  10. Hi there Those names don't ring a bell - but it was 15 years ago that my hubby got me the book. I've scoured my bookcases but can't find it anywhere - I have a feeling that I wasn't up to dealing with my own at the time, let alone reading about anyone else's, so it probably went to a charity shop. Lots of info from the fantastic Subs on the other thread though.
  11. There was a scottish team football manager who had an aneurysm and wrote a book and I think this was the title as it was the statistic he was given. Can't for the life of me remember who it was though - not Ferguson, way before he had his and I had mine; which is 15 years ago this year.
  12. Hahaha I'm talking regular - dabbled with the other in my early 20s but did nothing for me and preferred alcohol on a night out. Been smoking "regular" for 35 years and Neurosurgeon told me it had nothing to do with smoking and my chances of it happening again would be minimal with or without smoking. He also stated "off the record" that in my particular case, and because of the size of the aneurysm, that smoking probably saved my life - only because my SAH was aneurysmal and they believe it was there from birth. They had given me a full body scan with dye initially and found no other aneurysms and that all of my arteries were perfectly healthy, plaque free and blood was flowing freely through them all. Apparently they were the arteries of a 20 year old non-smoker - genetics I think. Obviously I am not saying that everyone will be OK to carry on smoking, as we're all as different as our bleeds are, so you should always follow the advise of your GP / Specialist.
  13. Don't start again if you've stopped - Kudos to you for having stopped. I never did and found it too hard to try to - it's my only real vice but if I know if I had more will power than I'd kick the habit pronto. It's not for lack of trying either unfortunately! For me drinking was a definite no no for about 6 months after the SAH - the hangovers were horrendous even after a couple of pints - I can hold more drink than hubby but for 6months after, WOW, the heads were banging. I agree with Karen, to get more specific answers to certain areas, start a new thread in the medical forums and there will definitely be more of a response. Keep that sense of humour though, whatever you do!!
  14. Hey you The survival % I gave was immediately after a bleed. I was given the same statistics of it happening again as you were and mine was aneurysmal - I have two and both were coiled at the same time. I still smoke as the statistic I was given to carry on smoking was minimally higher - more chance of getting hit by a bus apparently, so I took the personal choice not to give up. I still drink, though only occasionally. You are at the stage where you will question everything, and rightly so, so don't be afraid to ask but you'd be better placed asking the specialists for medical advice. You don't sound gloomy at all - you want and need to know so that you can process and that's brilliant. Hope your audible book was adventurous - maybe find one with a Batman adventure Take care xx
  15. Don't worry - you haven't offended - I couldn't read the book for months and then still struggled. 0.186% of those that have a brain bleed survive - how's that for perspective hahaha. Apparently you then fall into the other three categories - believe me, when I first read that I was terrified. You can determine those statistics, you can change them, but yes, it will take time and you do have to be patient. So unfortunately, you're going to have to have a word with that gorgeous 18 year old and tell him he has to slow down for the time being; just until you get over the whiskey induced hangover!! Easier said than done, but it really is the best route. Yes, Liverpool are definitely a test on the old blood pressure. I turned 50 last month and I have supported them since I first heard the Beatles played on vinyl by my parents, heard the accent and watch Yellow Submarine I'm pretty much the same when watching my beloved boys play - on the sofa, off the sofa, shouting, jumping etc - beats the gym Hold on to that sense of humour - team it with a good dollop of stubbornness and you'll get there - but you have to mix in patience!!
×
×
  • Create New...