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Has any one else been referred to the Neuro P.

Does anyone know what this involves and have you found it helpful?

I was at my OT this week and she says she is referring me as they are more specialised. I took it quite negatively I was actually expecting her to tell me we were finished. I had been feeling great and basically back to normal! And now I'm being told 3months down the line that I need to see a specialist , they will help with my social skills etc.

Rereading this is does seem quite trivial i should snap up the offer of any help. My OT is a lovely girl and she trys her best but she really doesn't have a clue about how I feel and how what she says impacts on me. I do know I can be challenging as I'm from a socialworky background but I've really lost my confidence and do suck up and reflect on what others say. The brain damage worry raises its head from time to time. In the hospital they said I was fine the brain has just aged 10 years! Now I'm obsessing about why my brain has aged. My best friend at home can always cheer me up. She says "no Aine you're not brain damaged you're brain has just aged because you're listening to that oul Country & Western Music!! ":lol: She has trendier taste in music than me. Anyway I've digressed quite alot there.

Guess there are two Issues Anyone seen a Neuro P and anyone else worried or been told they have brain damage.

Thanks

Aine

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Hi Ainie

Welcome back :lol:

Do you mean physologist? I saw one twice a day whey I was in the re-hab hospital then as an outpatient.

My brain was surverly damaged but I dont know if they said it in that way I'd need to ask Ronnie that one!

Take care

Louise.xx

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Hi Aine,

I've never been told that I officially have brain damage .... but I do definetly consider myself brain damaged .... My eyesight has been damaged and my left side is weak and I have walking problems, that's just to start with .... so yes, the bleed has damaged my brain and this is causing me problems. Brain damage can be subtle, ranging to severe.

Aine, at least if they're recognising that you have problems in certain areas, then you'll get the help that you need to work through it and hopefully your brain will learn to compensate if possible. When one part of the brain is damaged, often another part of the brain will take over. Don't worry too much about the labels, you're not going backwards but hopefully moving forwards in recognising that there is stuff to deal with. Recovery is ongoing, so keep positive, you're still at an early stage, but it sounds as though you're getting some really good medical help..... :) Good to have you back on the board..... :D

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Hiya Slim,

I spent two years seeing my clinical neuro psyc, and if you are anything like me you'll benefit from seeing yours. It's not about labels, and being "brain damaged" certainly is a BIG label because EVERYONE who has had a SAH has been "brain damaged" but then again anyone who has been drunk is also "brain damaged". What you'll find out over the period that you see this person is exactly what areas you have problems in, exactly. Whether it's concentration, memory etc etc and then you'll be told how to work around them but there are no instant cures, if there is such a thing as a cure.

The only thing I would suggest is to brush up on American culture, because most of the tests they use come from the "good ol' USA" well at least all of those they ran on me did. Kinda got annoying after a while :)

Scott

PS

The one thing we did do quite early on was to compare IQs pre and post SAH, and even I only lost ten points on my last test which could well be down to something other than the SAH!

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Guest Hannah

Hi Aine,

My mum has been seeing a Neuro Psychologist a couple of times a week and she says that she finds it really useful in terms of putting things into perspective and just havin a good old chat about how she's feeling. It's worth going along to see what its all about, especially as this is a service that isn't always accessible all over the country... maybe you could talk about the lack of confidence? Sometimes talking things through with an objective professional can help.

Take care

Hannahx

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Gosh I'm a ramber. Started off on Neuro P and ended up the main topic being brain damage.

Spoke to G.P shes excellent very understanding. Upshot is yes there probably is, but not brain damage is the sense that us lay people think of it. Again they don't like the term damage think of it more as a bruise or insult etc.

She explained probably more elloquently than I'm trying to replicate that even if some of the brain is damaged we have the ability to adapt and it doesn't mean that you will never get back to normal. It is much more positive to look at your own recovery rate. And as you guys pointed out people without brain trauma can damage their brain too e.g alcohol, she said Scans were taken research showed that many 65year olds had damaged area's in their brain and they functioned normally.

Am still quite angry generally and again she says look at this positively its another phase of the healing process. Also She wouldn't necessarily refer to a Neuro P right away as its important to give the brain a chance to get started on the healing process! So again I should look at that positively to it doesn't mean I got worse that they're referring me but that I'm heading for the next stage.

Thanks for the advice

Aine

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The term brain damage is only a label that we apply ..... if you've had a SAH you will have more than likely suffered some sort of brain damage ...we all vary as to the severity of the bleed.....it doesn't mean to say that another part of your brain won't compensate and rehab is all about finding means of coping and finding alternative methods of compensating. It does take time and patience, all depending on how much damage the brain has suffered. There isn't an easy fix and yes, you can return to near normality, however, that isn't to say that everybody who has a SAH can get back to their old normal selves. The damage is very individual and some SAH'ers aren't anywhere back to normality, many years down the line, but they do learn to adapt their lives to they way they are now and this is the most important aspect.

It also depends on where you've had the bleed ..... if you're unlucky to have had damage to the frontal lobe, then we know that this can cause changes to personality, disinhibition etc and throws up a lot of problems with relationships etc......A SAH is very individual and there will be a lot of reasons why somebody has a slower recovery than others or experiences more problems.

Aine, you are young and very early on with your recovery, so you should expect improvement .... there doesn't seem to be a cut off point from what I've read of people's experiences and people do experience recovery for many years. It's a case of trying your best and doing everything that you can to help maximise your recovery.

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I am curious about how much help I need post bleed. I am 34 and my post SAH CT shows that I have had a stroke as a result of my clipping and coiling. When I was tested by the stroke team, they said they couldn't find any sign of me having a stroke. And I am blessed to have gotten off so lucky, but I am confused about things, I can't focus on or understand multi-part questions and I just feel more stupid than I did in the past. Even though all the professionals say I am fine, do I need to ask for help to improve these things? Or should I just accept my new self.

Linda

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Hi Linda,

I would ask for help, I'm the same as you, I had bother reading a train timetable, I used to be a great scanner but now even when I scan these boards I miss loads. So I need to take my time.

I really think we are lucky if we get a Prof that really understands how we are feeling and think it seems to be up to us to push them and tell them what we need. On the plus side my memory function and ability to deal with complex ish things seems to be getting better.

Good Luck

Aine x

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  • 2 weeks later...

I went to my family doctor and was put on Anti-depressants. He asked me to visit a psychologist and I did. And it was great. He doesn't think I am depressed. instead he is going to have an appointment with my family doc and me at the same time so i can be refered to a neuro psychologist! It turns out I can't understand what people are saying to me becasue I keep forgeting what they just said! I am feeling less stupid now and can't wait til my next appointment on the 31st.

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  • 3 weeks later...

I had my appointment today and I was so glad the psychologist was in the room with me. When my Family doc started asking questions. I got very confused and didn't know how to answer or what he said. I saw the Psychologist nodding in the corner of my eye and he just told the GP to write the referal. I am so glad I had him there. If not, I don't think I could have explained why or what I wanted. I almost felt like I was being bullied. I am sure I wasn't but I was so confused by his questions.

So anyhow, in threee weeks time, I should have a referal and start moving forward. I am excited to get this going. I just want to be my old self. It may not be possible but if I can get pretty close that would be great too.

So for those that have done the testing, my psycholgist said it can be pretty demanding mentally. Given that I got all upset over a copule questions by my GP. Will I be stressed out at the neoro-psycholigist too?

Linda

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Hi Aine and everyone else too.

Heather has seen a number of pschologists and psychiatrists. I have attended most of her appts with her too. She has just been referred to another one too, we see him mid-June. Heather was unfortunate enough to have had damage to the frontal lobe area so her problems are suitable for psychologists and psychiatrists to work with. At first I was nervous because in the past due to Heathers risk taking behaviour, I have sat in on panels that have mentined the dreaded 'section' word. Luckily none of the professionals in the meeting took that idea any further.

All in all the team that Heather is working with at the moment have supported her in gaining insight and a better understanding of what has been going on for her. I for one am happy to have them around now.

Oh as for the brain damage, insult, trauma. Heather prefers the term brain injury or just injury. I suppose its horses for courses. I know that I have been frowned at when I have said things like 'Heathers brain damage causes her to x'. The PC brigade are not keen on brain damage but then I am not really bothered as to what they think. If its ok with Heather then thats how I discuss it.

Have nice friday you lot.

Andy

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