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Exercise/running post SAH


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Hi all ,

 

My SAH was on 7th January and I am wondering when it would be okay to go running again. I am not talking about next two weeks or so but generally ?  Are there any runners out there ? What was your experience? Any advice most gratefully received .

 

Josie

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Welcome to BTG Josephine.

We do have runners on the forum but your SAH was very recent and recovery times vary a great deal from person to person.

All you can really do is listen to your body and do not try to push yourself. Baby steps is the best way to go or you will possibly end up going backwards, two steps forward and one back often occurs.

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I suggest you follow your doctors advice on this one.  I only had a NASAH.  I was told not to run for 3 months until a follow up CT scan could be done to verify there was nothing hiding under the blood.  I was then given clearance.  But each one is different. 

 

Again, your doctor should advise you.  But if and when you do start, start slow and listen to your body.  You will fatigue more easily than you think.

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  • 5 weeks later...

Same as Broncothor, I had an NASAH, and I was told if I wished to I could run, cycle etc just listening to my body and not going mad. The only suggestion made was that I leave lifting heavy weights alone (I used to weight train quite a bit pre my NASAH). Exercise is something that really seems to vary between folks post SAH, some people can run a half marathon no sweat, others me included really suffer  from fatigue if I do to much.

 

Unfortunately what is too  much now is far less than I used to, and the first time I went out for a cycle ride post SAH, I flattened myself for 2 to 3 days afterwards with fatigue from doing what I thought was a light ride. Ho hum! You just have to learn where the new normal is. I train once a week with a PT who is experienced in cardiac rehab, and she uses the same exercises regimes to keep my blood pressure/heart rate low enough not to give me fatigue but I can still get a reasonable work out for half an hour, and still be standing the next day.  

 

There was a thread on here a coupe of years ago, and I recall that there was a lady who was a gym instructor (States side I think) who could still run some pretty long distances on a regular basis post SAH, but the thing that really triggered her fatigue was instructing big group classes. We all fatigue in different ways!

 

Good luck with it Josie, 

 

Greg.

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Thank you it helps to hear others experiences . Sorry for delay in responding I really cannnot figure out how to use site properly,the simplest of things really confuse me now . Tiredness all the time too I cannot believe I sleep so many hours . 

 

Best wishes Josie

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Don't worry Josie. Things will get better. I got very confused in the early days. Just made a rule to do 1 thing each day. 

 

When I had my SAH I was in the middle of splitting my bank account and changing lots of direct debits. I couldn't cope with it so in the end just resolved  to 1 per day and no more. It worked well and over time it got sorted. 

 

Take things slowly, you're doing really well just don't push too hard 

 

clare xx

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The confusion does pass. But it takes time and is so terribly frustrating. It seems like the more you push it, the more tired and confused you get. BUT...time does make a huge difference.  

 

I am am one year today from my sah. I spent three weeks in hospital and had two surgeries.  When I got home all I seemed to do was sleep. 

 

This is month I started running on the road again and went back to the gym properly. I'm frustrated that I can't lift equal weights on my left side, but at the same time...I'm here, I can walk and talk. I've learned patience tempered my frustration and feel I'm making constant but slow progress. I'm 49 now and simply want to be fit again by the time I'm 50. 

 

Good luck Josie and all xx

 

Helly

 

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Hello Josie,

I had my NASAH whilst out running in Dec 2016 (was half way through Marcothon 2016, as it happens). I first tried a slow 5k about 2 weeks ago and for me it's just about getting the confidence back to run again. GP said to take it slow, but as I had the haemorrage on a run (and that was an easy 5k too, with nary a hill) it's my emotions that are stopping me. I enjoy fell-running very much so I'll get back into it. The 5k I did was a repeat of 'that NASAH route' and nothing terrible happened. Good luck with your running recovery.

Daf

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Well done you 

I'm so jealous, I was running up to 10k B4 my SAH 6 months ago. I am still not driving, however I walk everywhere and started back at the gym after 4 months and treated myself to personal trainer 2 x a week, which has been of great  help to build my strength up as had a lot of general weakness and muscle wastage.

dont overdo it as you will get fatigued, its early days ?

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  • 2 years later...

Hi all 

I have not been on this site before so bear with me....I had a SAH (not sure what a NASAH is (sorry!) last September 2018.

 

I ran the London marathon in April 2018 and the Great north run in September- 3 days before the SAH. I was back running after about 10 weeks but slowly!

 

My rupture also happened whilst on a recovery run after the GNR. I was cautious and my family were initially very worried but I gradually built my running back up to a half marathon distance after 8 months post SAH and now I am back to producing similar times.

 

If it helps I kept my heart rate under 140 beats initially then 150 and now just watch when it gets to 160+ and then just stop and walk a bit until it comes back down. The running, for me, was hugely beneficial psychologically particularly when I couldn’t drive as I could regain some independence.

 

I often slept / napped afterwards though soI didn’t over do it. I found the naps became less frequent, speed improved and confidence too for me and others! 

 

I would speak to your neurosurgeon about what he thinks - mine was quite supportive due to my history. I was also in runners world as I contacted someone else who had the same thing and they got back to ultras ! I think it’s individual but hope that helps x

 

Tbh I found it more of a challenge to get back to work!!!

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