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Paul - New Member - SAH 3 months ago


codewarrior_777
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Good Morning Paul-

 

And a warm welcome to BTG

 

As Tina says-you and your family will find much help and support on this site- 

 

I am sure you will get comments to allay your concerns about the shunt as the day progresses-

 

Subs  (my wife had her SAH four years ago)

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Hi Paul - I have responded to your post in another forum, but welcome again  :wink:

 

Feel free to ask anything you want and we'll do our best to get you through this, however, we cannot give medical advice as we're not qualified but we can support you through the ups and downs of recovery. There are great people on here who have a wealth of experience and the biggest hearts ever.

 

Take care.

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Hi Paul,

 

Welcome to BTG.  A lot of us seem to be able to remember the events leading up to the SAH, but not immediately after and we all seem to rely on what others tell us we did.

 

In my own case, I said some really stupid things.   In hospital, they asked me if I knew where I was and I said "Matalan" (That's a clothing store), they also asked me if I knew who was our Prime Minister and I said "Diane", I don't even know anyone by that name.  Really, that's not important, unless it persists, but thankfully it didn't and I made a good recovery.  I suppose it's only natural that when your brain goes through such a trauma, that it will take time to recover.  The big question is 'to what extent will it recover?

 

All of us it seems will have a different answer to that question but we owe it to ourselves, those that care for us and those that saved us to make the best of what we've got.

 

So try to draw a line under the event and move forwards from it as best you can and enjoy your 'second chance' at life.

 

It's not always easy, but over time I'm sure you'll get better to one degree or another and bad memories won't be erased but they'll fade over time.

 

Good luck, and let us know how you get on!

 

Macca

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Hi Paul,

 

Welcome to BTG.  A lot of us seem to be able to remember the events leading up to the SAH, but not immediately after and we all seem to rely on what others tell us we did.

 

In my own case, I said some really stupid things.   In hospital, they asked me if I knew where I was and I said "Matalan" (That's a clothing store), they also asked me if I knew who was our Prime Minister and I said "Diane", I don't even know anyone by that name.  Really, that's not important, unless it persists, but thankfully it didn't and I made a good recovery.  I suppose it's only natural that when your brain goes through such a trauma, that it will take time to recover.  The big question is 'to what extent will it recover?

 

All of us it seems will have a different answer to that question but we owe it to ourselves, those that care for us and those that saved us to make the best of what we've got.

 

So try to draw a line under the event and move forwards from it as best you can and enjoy your 'second chance' at life.

 

It's not always easy, but over time I'm sure you'll get better to one degree or another and bad memories won't be erased but they'll fade over time.

 

Good luck, and let us know how you get on!

 

Macca

Thanks for the encouragement Macca!

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You're welcome Paul!

 

Our World War II prime minister Winston Churchill (remember him?) once said "When you're going through hell - keep going." 

 

In other words It might be bad at the moment but if you keep going, it'll get better!

 

Great man our Winston - Keep going Paul! Patience is a virtue!

 

Macca

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Welcome Paul. I have no memory other than the night prior and then fast forward a few weeks but even after that though it's still a little blurry but I kept a diary and it's hilarious reading. The writing looks like it's an 5 year old imposter and it's mainly jibberish but it a good marker for me to how far things can improve given time and patience.

The hard thing for me was the adjustment to the fact that life changed so suddenly, you feel your sharks bite scar for the shunt on your head and the raised cut where the stomach piping runs , the haircut is traumatic and things just feel dreadfully different and off kilter so take your time in this process.

Be kind to youself. Talk about how you feel, here if that helps and to people around you. Don't bottle it up. Time will heal. I can honestly say I am in a good place and feeling healthy and happy. Yes I've had to adjust to my changes and I live differently but it's mostly all good .

As Macca wisely shared Churchill's words , here's another quote from him that I have on my mirror ' Keep on Keeping on '

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  • 2 weeks later...

Hi Paul

I also lost 4 days in hospital due to memory don't remember seeing the consultant and have been told by family members what happened and what was said this makes it very difficult to get your head around. Its almost seems unbelievable at times as if it didn't happen because you can't remember . I had my SAH on 21st July.

Tracie

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