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Kindra: 4 months out from NASAH


Kindra
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Hello! I'm a 58-year-old woman who had a non-aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage four months ago. I was one of the lucky ones--very few cognitive or motor skills affected. But my eyesight did get worse, and I still have trouble daily with mild fatigue, dizziness/nausea and headaches. I've had a chronic cough caused by sinus drainage for two decades, and that doesn't help! I've noticed a few weird mental lapses in conversation and in writing. I think I've done something when I really haven't. Sometimes, in the middle of a sentence, I have to stop for a second and think of the rest of the sentence before I say it. Early on, I kept forgetting to flush the toilet, for example. Lol!

 

I feel almost guilty that I've done so well when I read about some of you who have had bigger problems. They say my son's quick action to get me to the hospital and a prompt life-flight to an expert hospital probably not only saved my life, but made for a better outcome in terms of damage done and ongoing problems. But, because my problems are minimal, I also tend to mentally minimize the problems I do have.

 

I get frustrated when I can't make it through the day at work, and sometimes it's not clear that I'm beginning to have problems. I'm a contract writer/editor, and my clients can be very twitchy. If I can't respond quickly and well, they will sometimes just stop giving me assignments and find someone else. So, I tend to push myself.

 

I've only been working full-time for the last several weeks. It's tough for me to know where the limit is...I sometimes push to the point that I fall apart emotionally and have to lie down for a half a day and watch Netflix and sleep to recover. I think I know what I need to do to change that. It's just tough getting used to it. On the other hand, I have noticed I find myself sometimes using the stroke as an mental excuse to be lazy and NOT meet deadlines. Sigh.

 

Apparently, as my docs have said and many of you have confirmed, I don't have to worry about this type of stroke happening again. The chances are about the same as for anyone. But, I probably need to pay closer attention to what's going on with my body, so I can feel better.

 

They say stress wasn't a factor (or we can't know that it was), but I was working 16-hour days and had a month of travel right before the stroke, so it seems to make sense that it might have contributed to the cause, but who knows. There are some other things that could have been a factor, but not high blood pressure. Mine is naturally on the low side. I guess part of surviving this is accepting that we can't know everything about what happened and we can't be sure what we should do now to stay healthy.

 

Anyway, I just wanted to say it's very cool to have found this forum, and I'll be back.

 

Kindra

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 Thank you, Casey! I've seen several mentions of drinking a lot of water. Can you tell me why that's an important thing to do?  There are so many other great tips here — things I hadn't thought of, but I know will help. I'm taking a break from work right now as we speak!  I hope you are feeling much better since you had the stroke. 

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Hi kindra welcome to btg xxx

 

The reason drinking water is important after sah

 

Headaches

Headaches are common after a subarachnoid haemorrhage, but they tend to ease over time. They are not as painful as when you had your haemorrhage, and you should be able to control them with over-the-counter painkillers, such as paracetamol.

Drinking plenty of fluids, as well as avoiding alcohol and caffeine, can also reduce the severity and frequency of these headaches.

 

Hope you continue to improve xxx

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Hi Kinda :)

 

A very warm welcome to BTG !

 

At 4 months you are still in the early stages of recovery and as Casey says listen to your body, pace yourself and rest up plenty.  

Drinking water certainly helps with the headaches as Jess has explained.

 

A phased return to work often helps to find your limits and what you can and cant cope with in the early stages. I dont know if this is something you can do in your line of work? Gradually build up the amount of work you take on. Your body is definitely telling you when you have pushed too much. 

 

Go steady and and let us know how you are doing.

Take care

Tina xx

 

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Hi Kindra

 

Your story sounds similar to mine except I had the complication of hydrocephallus and and evd which stopped me driving for a period. My blood pressure was historically low too so interesting that it should happen to us.

 

Sounds like you are doing really well only 4 months out and back at work full time. The signs that you are doing too much are as you describe. You fall apart emotionally and have to do nothing for a while, perhaps shortening your hours would alleviate this problem. I am 2 years out and still suffer from fatigue and have days when I fall apart. This is usually after doing too much.

The problem is that while you are doing it you feel fine, it's afterwards that the problems arise. This can be quite difficult to control so you need to set some type of time limits on your working periods and stick to them . It's hard - I know - but it does help in the long run.

 

Time is a great healer though and things will get better. As everyone else has said keep up the water it really does help.

 

Keep us posted on your progress

 

Clare xx

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Hi Kindra,

 

Welcome to BTG!

 

Wow - 16 hour days and a month of travel?  Well, it might not have been mental stress, but it will have been physical stress!  It sounds like you are very conscientious and don't want to let anyone down.

 

Did you take your eye off the ball and forget about looking after yourself in doing that?

 

Perhaps, and I am saying this to help, not to criticise, you need to look at a bit of time management and learning to say 'no' to people a little more.  If you always do what you always did you will get the same results.  Be a bit more ruthless in what you accept, and clinical in defining cut off points when you say, "Right, that's enough for today."

 

For your own well being, please look at your lifestyle and the choices you make and alter some of them to make your life a little easier.  If you keep going at maximum output, at some stage you will suffer burn out.

 

You sound like an amazing person, but sometimes you have to put yourself first so that you can give your best when you are required to.  Resting well is as important as working well.  If you keep going, your performance will deteriorate over time anyway and you will be expending more effort for dwindling performance standards.  Those you work for need to understand that too.

 

Listen to your body because, in its way, it's like a warning light coming on in your car, it's your brain telling you to slow down and get checked over before a catastrophic breakdown occurs!

 

Take care,

 

Macca

 

 

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Hiya Kindra,

 

I worked with my hubby and took the stress  of people going broke on us, and in the end it told on me.  (Win blames others for SAH lol)

 

You are doing great and all what others have said I agree with.

 

Just keep a smile close to hand and shame you cannot carry a camp bed around for those moments of extreme fatigue.  Darn it xx

 

Wishing you all the best and listen to what your body is telling you.  Easy for me to say xx

Be Well

Win xxxx  I believe happiness can get us through this and of course the odd occasional song from myself xx

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Hi Kindra, welcome to BTG.  

 

Congratulations to your son for his quick thinking.   

 

I hope you can find a way to perhaps reduce your workload, if only for the short term.  There is little wonder you are crashing after you have overdone it - a bit like trying to sprint on a badly sprained ankle before it's healed - it just doesn't work.  Brains are far more complex, we can't see them, but as they control everything we do, we need to give them rest when they've been injured to give them the best chance of recovery.  I think we are all guilty of trying to do too much, too soon.

 

It's appears you are aware of what is required, the hard part is putting it into practice - it will be worth it though.    

 

Wishing you all the best,

Sarah

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Welcome!

 

You and I are similar in several ways.  I am mostly fully recovered, but eyesight, fatigue and memory problems are still around a bit.  They do get better as time goes by, so be patient and listen to your body as it tries to heal.

 

I send prayers and best wishes.

 

Chris

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Wow! I just got back to this forum today after being away for awhile, and I am blown away by all the thoughtful and knowledgeable responses. I'll bet all of you know what I mean when I say it is much appreciated to hear from those who know what I'm dealing with. I feel as though I've taken a step or two backward lately, but I think it's because I expect too much. I'm really taking to heart what all of you said about water, slowing down and giving my body a chance to heal. If I have to think of the stroke as an "excuse" to take a break, then so be it. It's an allowed excuse. :) Thanks very much to all of you for taking the time to welcome me and share your thoughts and advice. 

 

One of the weirdest things about this, by the way, is feeling as though I'm as good as new in the morning, but then feeling like an invalid by nightfall! How is that every day I think I'm back to "normal"? Lol!

 

One of the best things about this is how much value life seems to have for me now. I don't take things for granted. I love every minute I'm conscious...

 

xoxox

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You're welcome Kindra!

 

Just remember, it's important to listen to what your 'self' is telling you as well as what we try to help you with.

 

All the answers you require are right there within your own body - we just confirm it for you!

 

What you describe is how many of us feel - spot on, in fact!  So just adjust to take account of it all and you'll be just fine and dandy!  Get on and enjoy life - it's what it's there for!

 

Best wishes,

 

Macca

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