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Guest Godfrey3
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Guest Godfrey3

My husband recently suffered a major SAH and only 10 days after the operation and against all advice has started smoking again. Any thoughts on this? Has anyone else carried on smoking. After what he has put himself and all the rest of the family through I am more than a little concerned and upset.

TD carer and long suffering wife

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Hi Godfrey 3 and welcome to the site i'm sure you'll get several answers on this one, my wife had an sah in march last year, and the surgeon said are either of you smokers and a said i was and he told me no more smoking near her i try to stick to that, i know other people who've had a SAH who have carried on smoking, but smoking is one of the things they say can contribute to an sah, my honest feeling on this is yes smoking is'nt good for anyone, but wot is, drinkings a no no eating a no no, and a surgeon will tell you that once the anuerysmn is dealt with, it's dealt with, so who can honestly say, sorry i can't be of more help, but i'm sure you will hear more than one opinion on this,Good luck to you and your husband, Rod

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Hi Godfrey 3

I stopped smoking 6 months ago, the same day of my sha and still now i feel like having a cigarette so I really dont consider having given up smoking¡¡¡

Going though a Sha or any life threatening illness is really difficult, perhaps right now this is an scape for your husband, I think that if I smoked I would not be so drepresseed ¡¡

I dont see any details of his recovery/2nd effects etc but recomend you try to talk to him as much as possible, dont press too much. He is also very aware smoking does him no good but perhaps right now its the only thing which takes off the pressure

Sorry cant be of much more help, wish you both the best

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I was actually having a cigarette when I had my SAH. And as I didn't go to the doctors until the next day I was still smoking up until that point. But once the SAH was diagnosed I haven't had a cigarette since. It has been almost 9 months now and I have only just started to not feel like a cigarette.

My consultant also said that it can be a contributing cause to SAH and has also told my husband not to smoke near me as it is not good for me. But who knows! Personally now that I haven't been smoking for a while I am glad that I have given up as it can only cause health problems. But you really need to be ready to give up and no amount of people telling you to do so will change your mind.

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Hi

I gave up smoking 3 years ago and I don't believe I will ever smoke again, and I have felt that way since giving up, so now that I have suffered SAH I cannot imagine smoking again.

I can honestly say that I have had very few occassions where I have felt like having a cigarette - literally just to pass some time, not because I have been desperate for one.

I cannot stand the smell of it now, and I try to steer clear of being anywhere near smoke or smokers. Although I have friends who smoke, I have to try to stay away when they do smoke.

I read the book 'The easyway to give up smoking' by Allen Carr. It may not work for everyone but it is worth a try. (It did however take me a year from buying the book to actually building up the courage to read it and try to give up! - but I did actually find it quite easy, most of the time..)

I have to agree with DebbieMcKenzie that the individual has to be ready to give up. No amount of scare-mongering or badgering from others will assist in be able to quit. From experience this causes rebellious action. We all know the dangers of smoking yet many still continue to smoke with this knowledge.

I know we are told all the time about all the different things that are bad for us, but I do not think it has been said for many years now that smoking could possibly be good for us in any way. It has very much been documented just how bad it is. I was quite shocked to discover just how many chemicals are contained in a cigarette.

Maybe you should mention that you are upset and concerned that he continues to smoke after what has happened, and point out that you are not telling him to give up, because that is entirely his choice. He has to take responsibility for himself. It may spark some thought about potentially giving up.

Good luck

Kel x

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Guest miss_griff

Hi

My mom had her SH in Feb 1999, she had smoked for 30+ years I bet, obviously whilst she was in hospital she didn't smoke and when she came home she didn't have one, but approx 10 weeks after she went out for a little stroll to the shop and came back with a packet and started again, she said she felt like she needed them! I have never smoked, so who am I to comment, I just thought it seemed daft she had gave up for that long then went and brought another packet. Fortunately in 2005 I had my first child and she decided that she wasn't going to smoke any more and hasn't had another one since thankfully!

She had to be ready in her mind to give in, strange for her health she couldn't do it but for the sake of her grandchild she could. I am not going to complain for what ever reason she battled through.

Good Luck with your husbands recovery x

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Hello.

I carried on smoking for six months after my SAH.

Then one day I just decided that I didn't want to smoke anymore and so stopped.

It certainly is true that when you feel it's time to stop you will.

I am glad that I stopped though. It has saved me a fortune. and I do feel much healthier.

But I shall not go on like the usual reformed smoker.

However. My Neuro-consultant did point out that smoking can cause vaso-spasms. which is something a SAH survivor needs.

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Hi

I'm one of the guilty ones.....I came round in HDU after the op and was craving desperately from the Saturday until the Wednesday when I finally was free of all drips etc and got Morris to wheel me outside for a cigarette. Having said that I now smoke a lot less than I did before SAH.

I know I should stop smoking but I enjoy it so much but am in the process of trying to give up at the moment down to just 2 or 3 a day. The nurse has me on Champix been on it for 3 weeks but it is only just starting to make me feel sick when I have a ciggie.....fingers crossed it will work soon.

The after effects of having an SAH are quite traumatising and from personal experience I found having a puff eased some of the stress and frustration in the early weeks of recovery.

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Well Im Another Gulity one for Smoking though Have really cut down after My TIA, I was on 40 a day that is 20 Taylor made and 20 ish Rollys

Now im down to 10 max a day And I feel so much better for it.

Like Janet I enjoy it so much, and working alone its a sort of Company if you get what i mean, It alows me to Stop and take a break if i feel i need one.

My Doctor/Consultant told me that Smoking wasnt the Cause of it but it helped towards it so I ought to Give it up but my main aim is to Lose weight and as She said you can not be expected to do both. And i had to laff and the next bit she said, " you are only a man" LOL

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Hey there

I'm another guilty one. I stopped briefly, but I found myself getting more depressed than I was before so it was the lesser of two evils for me. I still smoke and the only medic that moans at me is my GP. My neurosurgeon told me that if I stopped smoking then I'd have a 1% chance of it happening again - if Icarried on I'd have a 3% of it happening agan, but I've no more chance of it happening again than anyone else in the world.

High Blood Pressure is a factor in SAH and I've NEVER had high blood pressure -even when pregnant. On my last trip to my GP my blood pressure was "Perfect" and I still smoke about 20 a day. I have tried quitting, but it's my only vice really - I rarely drink and don't touch chocolate.

I'd love to quit but I'll do it when I'm ready and willing, otherwise I'll just set myself up for failure.

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Hello! There is no doubt at all, the smoker has to want to stop. I had been smoking for fifty years when I had my SAH and knew it would be a good idea to stop but never quite made it. I was in hospital, and confined to bed for seven weeks, so when I came out I was over the worst of the cravings and it seemed daft to start again, so here I am wealthier, healthier and two years on. But I was obviously ready to stop! That I am sure is the only way, don't push, it used to make me more determined not to stop:crazy:

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Guest Godfrey3

Thanks for all the replies. I know he is the only one who can give up so will try not to nag!

Next problem, I have contacted the DVLA but does any one know what happens next? Do they write back to you and when can you start to drive legally again?

Nice to know I am not the only one out there with sleepy problems.

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Hello :)

I am also still a smoker although I recently gave up for two weeks then started again! :( I only smoke 3 to 5 a day though.

I think the DVLA get in touch with your doctors then write and inform you when you can drive again.

Welcome to the site

Vivien

x

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  • 1 year later...

though i would bounce this thread up again for any smokers :biggrin:

ive been so stressed and shattered these pass few weeks im back on them only about 3 a day it was either smoking or me killing someone. ive stopped before for 2 1/2 years and then the last skint was for 11 months :oops:

donna

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I am also a smoker so read this with much interest. I am annoyed that I continue to smoke but seem to be totally without common sense or will power....and in the early days the disappointment on my children's & families faces made me feel very guilty but also made me rebel and say I'd do what I like. I also think it's very hard to accept that you could've died and are continuing to do something that may have contributed to it - denial is always a good place to be.

Skippy - I liked what your Dr said - 3%. My surgeon told me that stopping was the only way to give myself a chance!

Janet - I asked a year or so back for the anti smoking drug (I forget it's name but it was the one before Champix?) I was told no way as it raises blood pressure - I kind of thought that in the long term it was better of 2 evils as smoking clearly does that too! I am going to go back & ask about Champix. I'd be really interested to know how you get on with it. (It might've been called Zyban????)

Michelle x

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  • 1 month later...

Hi Michelle the Champix would have worked if I had continued taking it but life intervened with shed loads of stress and the evil weed became necessary. It was Zyban previously but caused a lot of problems so was withdrawn. Champix is good as you build up the dose gradually eventually getting to a point were the ciggies taste awful.

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Thank you Janet.

I asked Dr again 2 weeks ago & this time he agreed until he checked my blood pressure. It hasn't gone down even though my BP medicine was doubled a year ago, so I have to get that sorted before I can try the Champix.

I hope you get through all the stress and manage to try again when you're ready.

Michelle x

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Hi everyone,

I was a heavy smoker at the time of of my SAH (cigars) and since recovering have had an ongoing battle to quit. I still smoke occasionally (don't know why ,because I don't like the smell , or taste, it just seems so deeply ingrained into my life). Luckily, I have a job where I can't smoke during the day, and I don't miss it at all. Nor can I smoke at home (my wife and daughter forbid it in the house) but when I take the dog for a walk or go to the shops I always have a smoke. Stupid, I know. I overcame a real bad alcohol problem so you would think quitting smoking would be similar. I wish smoking would be made illegal so all the weak- willed people like me could stop. Just never quit trying to quit.

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