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excercise, over exertion at gym effects on brain


manus27
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hi my name is dermot, im 27 years old, had sah in 2008 and stroke, worked hard since to regain mostly full power after left sided paralysis, ive been using weights at the gym for some time now, but recently ive started to feel achy in my neck/ head slightly after a session, im beginning to worry that perhsaps weight training might put pressure on my blood vessells, but i dont know, when i last spoke to the doctor a year or so ago, he said as long as i dont over do it, he was very vague on the subject. i wont get to see him again for a long time due to the waiting list here in ireland, i was just hoping to hear people with similar problems to me, could tell me their expeiriences with excercise and particularly weight training. has anyone had any problems or usefull advice on the subject, any help would be great, i love excercising, it keeps me going, dont want to hace to give up, but im really anxious about the effect it mite be having on my brain,i try not to over exert myself, but perhaps somtimes i do. thanks

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Hi Dermot! Hmmm I can't help because... well, I've done hardly any exercise since the SAH! I assume you mean you have a wait to see the specialist. What does your GP say? I am no doctor, but I've always understood exercise to be beneficial. Maybe they mean "gentle exercise"! Also, is there a physio or personal trainer you can ask for advice? They should have some idea of what kind of stress going to the gym puts on a body?

Sorry to not be much help. Ooh another idea is the specialist nurses on the Brain and Spine Foundation forum - they might be able to help.

Good luck!

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Welcome to BTG. Just read your post about weights and exercise. Good for you on being able to get back to the gym.

I have recently went back to the gym myself, like yourself i too had my SAH/s in 2008.

I spoke with my consultant,about things i could do,and exercise was brought up.

He said he was all for people who could manage exercise and who were able to do it,obviously within their limits.

I have only managed to go back to the gym,and i had to get my induction again and the instructor wanted me to do the weights.But i explained to him i was to scared to use the weights with my history.So am sorry i cant help you with that 1

i was at the gym last night and was on the crosstrainer for a bit and i got a slight pain in my head for a few mins and felt light headed

Think that was prob my body telling me it had enough

But overall i do feel better when i go,and if i push it to long my body lets me know and i stop

Speak with your GP and get his opinion on it.

take care

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Hi Dermot

I think all the GP's and Neuro consultants are rather vague on what we can do.

I had my SAH in 11th Dec 2009 and was coiled finally on 18th Dec 2009... on 10th Feb 2010 I was told to get back to work, on a phased return and I was ok to go back to the gym but take it easy... I didn't go back to work for a couple of weeks after that meeting, and then took about 3 months ease myself back to full-time... and I didn't then go back to the gym until June 2010. I just wasn't able to do it before then, I was just too tired with trying to get back to work and back to living!

When I did go back to the gym I was also worried about doing any weights initially, but I spoke to a personal trainer and he devised a new plan for me, so I started on low weights and have built up ever so slightly, and am still on relatively low weights compared to pre-SAH.

I have recently had some slight dizzy spells on the cross-trainer, which my neuro-cons told me could be lack of fitness...but when I raised my eyebrows he then suggested it is perhaps dehydration due to the BP meds I take (which are a diuretic also). I wouldn't say I am fit, but then I wouldn't expect to get dizzy from lack of fitness either. I try to do the gym for an hour or so, 2 or 3 times a week usually, and try to go swimming once a week too if I can.

I would approach your GP and a personal trainer at the gym to gauge their opinions, and like Jen suggested maybe contact the nurses who cover the phoneline on the Brain & Spine Foundation helpline.

Hope you manage to get some suitable advice. It is difficult to know what 'taking it easy' actually entails, as it can be vastly different for us all.

Take care

Kel x

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Hi Dermot! Welcome to Behind the Gray'.

I had a non aneurysm hemorrhage and my neurosurgeon (i did not have surgery) said absolutely no weights for one year. It's been just over three months and I am doing wee weights. Just 3 pounds per hand (hand held weights- not the bar kind) to keep my arms in shape. Your neuro specialists should tell you what you can do. I say that with a wink because they don't tell us much! :wink:

Sandi K.

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hi dermot and welcome to BTG

im 27 too and had my sah 10 months ago. Im only now trying to get back to the gym at the minute ive booked an induction next week to get a slow programme to start with not sure about weights but i was told to live as if it had never happened by my consultant except not to bungie jump or deep sea dive :lol: think i can manage this . i also had asked about rollercoasters etc im im allowed to go on any of them

speak soon donna

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Hey there

I was told under no circumstances was I to lift heavy weights or do anything strenuous as it puts pressure on the brain via the heart - ie raised blood pressure.

Lack of fitness can cause dizziness as your heart isn't used to pumping as hard - the heart swells during excerise as you are asking for more oxygenated blood - so the dizziness is actually lack of oxygen due to the heart not being able to cope as much.

Do be careful and check with your GP before any exercise post SAH as it all raises blood pressure - ironically enough exercise is supposed to make you feel better :lol:

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Hi Dermot! I agree with the others regarding speaking to your dr. and a personal trainer. A reputable trainer will ask you to have medical clearance with specifics as to what's allowable for your situation.What kind of lifting are you doing? Heavy lifting can be dangerous if not done properly (body mechanics, spotters, proper breathing, etc...) even for people with perfect health. Please do be careful and get some answers from your doctor first. I used to be a personal trainer (had to be certified w/my massage license in order to bill for exercise). To see me now, you'd be ROFL :lol: Like Sarah, I mostly lift grocery bags! Personally, my dr. said nothing over 10 lbs, no pushing, pulling, straining of any kind for the first several months. Walking was encouraged. I'm still in the walking stages - and don't do enough of it :roll:

Hope you get some good info from your dr. Good luck to you!!!

Carolyn

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Hi Dermot,

I had my SAH in October 2006. Like you I had some some serious left sided paralysis (& still have some now).

I started exercising (light aerobics & walking) again in February 2007 to regain some strength & co-ordination.

In the March of 2007 I started swimming to build stamina. It was a full year after the SAH that I was able to return to the gym.

I started with VERY light weights and gentle cardio workouts (cross trainer, rower, bike, etc) and built up gradually.

I am back at the gym three times a week now and lifting heavier weights than befor the SAH and able to do a full 30 minutes cardio workout without a break.

but before I started this I saw my GP who gave me the proper advice needed.

Hope this has helped.

Ern

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thanks again for all your advice, think i may know problem, its not from lack of fitness im getting dizzy, i think its because ive started a medication for partial/complex seizures (keppra) a few months ago, mite be affecting my blood pressure. think when doctors say not to be lifting heavey, its because if you have an aneurysm. excerting yourself too much can cause it too pop. anyerysms take years to form i believe. anyway im cutting down on heavy weights to be safer, was at gym today actually, did hour, max lifting 30kg on machines. feel great after, does anyone on here do much excercising. i would reccomend it to any sah survivor who is able, swimming is freat to start with, i started swimming after my stroke, helped me regain power, then i started running, got rid of limp. did 10 k evenyt last year in 47 mins. ive beenb told i made a miraculase recovery by doctors, but i dont think it was a miracle, just hard work. thanks for all your advise on my problem, what a great site, i know where to now for advice in the future

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  • 1 month later...
hi dermot and welcome to BTG

im 27 too and had my sah 10 months ago. Im only now trying to get back to the gym at the minute ive booked an induction next week to get a slow programme to start with not sure about weights but i was told to live as if it had never happened by my consultant except not to bungie jump or deep sea dive :lol: think i can manage this . i also had asked about rollercoasters etc im im allowed to go on any of them

speak soon donna

Reading up on old posts and i have lied in this one :oops::oops: im only 26:crazy: and had my bleed at 25 :oops:

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  • 3 weeks later...

I had a non aneurysmal bleed 8 months ago. My original neurosurgon said I could go back to rigorous workouts and have no restrictions.

Another neurosurgon who is a marathon runner and triathlete and mountain climber said that if he had my exact same bleed that he would return to all of his previous activities.

At this point I am too nervous to return to working out since the cause of my bleed wasnt found so I dont know what to think.

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It's difficult to know what to do for the best regarding exercise.

I do exercise, but I cannot do it at the same intensity as before. It is not a case of 'holding back', I genuinely am unable to attain the same level.

I was describe myself as incredibly fit prior to my SAH, which was 18 months ago. I trained six times a week, with a running club and a personal trainer at the gym. I ran the Berlin Marathon 2009, eight weeks before my SAH.

I can't run with my running club anymore as realistically, what I do now is 'jog' it is not running. I am unable to jog without taking regular walking breaks and I often stop. I used to love running with my friends, but I have to jog alone now as jogging and chatting is tiring. Plus it is difficult for me to make allowances for another person's pace. I sadly focus better if I have my own agenda.

Additionally, I ended my gym subscription recently too. I could not lift the same weights as before and the travel to the gym and back was jading me. The gym was located in a nearby town and I hated the close proximity of other cars and people.

I did not like the loud music in the gym and I would become startled with sudden noises. Additionally if someone chatted with me, I would be too tired to train and would have to come home early. It was a complete waste of money!

I have since bought some DVD's for the house, which are suiting me better. (The old me would have found them far too easy!) but I think it is important to do some exercise, rather than none at all.

So in a basic sense, I think it is possible to revert back to your old hobbies; but whether you do them in the same capacity may be a different matter.

I used to run marathons; and I don't think it is totally unrealistic that I could do so now, if I trained of course. However, the way I approach the marathon would be very very different, to the extent that I may not think it worth it.

I would probably have to train for six - nine months instead of the conventional four; I would have to give up all my voluntary work, as training alongside work commitments would be impossible; I would have to choose a quiet, countryside marathon, as I hate busy cities now and I would have to take regular walking breaks and stop every 2-3 miles at least....

Not only that, I get good days and very bad days. I may wake up race day feeling rubbish - and that would be the end of that!

So yes, I think it is possible to do the same as before in a basic sense; but whether it is in exactly the same way is debatable.....

I know understand that exercise, whilst is very good for improving fitness; the brain injury still remains - and no amount of running is going to get rid of it!

Lynne

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