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limitations after your SAH


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Hello all, 

 

I know a lot of you have had your SAH years ago and I was wondering if I could get a little knowledge from your experiences.  I had my SAH in April 2019.  I've been doing really well - went back to work about a month after I was released from my 3 week hospital visit. 

 

I struggled with that in the beginning - being tired all of the time and having headaches.  I was also horribly depressed after.  The tiredness went first, then the depression.  Now I'm only having headaches every so often, and they are in no way as bad as they were.

 

So, here comes the question.  What are some limitations you've experienced after your SAH?  I'm flying out this week to California - and I had to ask my neurologist if I could.  He gave me permission. 

 

I also asked about roller coasters, and he gave me a firm no on that one.  This has me wondering - what are other things that we shouldn't do, or should avoid other than roller coasters?   Are there things you've done but struggled with that you believe someone that has had a stroke shouldn't do?  

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Hi Charming,

I was given hardly any chance but that was from OT's.  Wanted to put me in a home as I'd never be the same.  They never checked that my Brain and Hydrocephalus.  A year later approx a shunt fitted and now watch out world I'm back lol .

 

Cannot walk very far as back aches but after being told I will never walk again 1000 yards suits me on a good day but on a bad day I take to chair !!


Avoid stress and sing and carry a spare smile, Do never ever listen to others sob stories as they bring you down so keep happy and go enjoy holiday.

Always drink water and remember we are survivors  maybe  forgetful ones but we made it so be happy and enjoy yourself. 

 

We all get down days but they get few and far between as time goes on xxx 

 

Happy holiday xxxx  Had my big 70 party and I got up and sang  lol poor family  ha xxx

 

 

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Hi Charming,

After my SAH followed by Vasospasm I was told "go live your life...Now I realize that being 64 probably already was putting limitations on it but like you I was left wondering.  

 

After my stroke I had a trip booked and paid for 4 months out to South America, the Neuro said have a good trip...I went and I did...very cautiously such as I wanted to walk up the side of a mountain path in SA but I rode up instead worrying that it would be too much...

 

I love to snorkel, and I do but am a bit worrisome doing it (I guess I don't enjoy it as freely as I did before) but i do it perhaps cutting my time..

 

No doctor gave me limitations...I think I had hoped for guide lines, didn't get that either...

 

Two and a half years out I still am making choices as to what I feel ok doing.. I would not do anything that risks injury to my head...haha pretty obvious I guess...everything else I do as I tolerated...sometimes struggling with something and then attempting it again perhaps after more rest.  Depends on how important something is also...

 

Very individual choices all depending on what limitations we feel we have...

Time plays in here also...I have regained confidence as time has gone on...

 

I wish you well in all your challenges .

Jean

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Basically I got told no skiiing, no bungee, no scuba, no rollercoasterS! Tbh I couldn’t imagine doing any of those now with my Shunt  on board anyway so was fine with that.

 

i have found altitude can affect me, high wind, sudden drop in atmospheric pressure but California should Be pretty good weather wise I imagine unless it’s high humidity. 

 

You need to go with what’s comfortable for you. I for instance could not bear a theme park of any kind even now and whilst i have managed a couple of concerts since I really struggle with the noise, intensity and sound of that kind of event.....it wipes me...and I loved gigs....but I still go, some bands are worth the toll! you’ll find what works .

 

if you are back at work and feel ok then just probably avoid anything that could cause sudden jerky movements....you’ll know if it’s no good. Give yourself a little more consideration when you travel , drink lots of water and take more rests, but  have fun. 

Daff 

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Hi there

 

I've no limitations at all from a doing what I want to do point of view.  The only thing I have had to stop doing is my exercising (used to run and step aerobics) as I can't stand the vibrating feeling I get in my head.

 

Take your experts advice, but if you're not sure why they've given an answer, question it to find out.

 

Enjoy your trip x

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  • 2 weeks later...

 Hey guys!  Thank you so much for your advice and experiences!

 

I had a wonderful trip.  Plane didn't bother me at all.  I was tired some of the days while I was there but that didn't stop me. 

 

I've had trouble sleeping since I had my SAH so I have Lunesta, which knocks me right out.  Glad I had those on the trip.  I only had to use pain medicine once while I was there - but oddly - since I've been home I have had horrible headaches every day.  It's really weird, actually, since I've been feeling so well.

 

Going to call the neuro doc next week if I keep having them.

 

Again, I appreciate everyone for replying and letting me know what has been going on with you.  ❤️ 

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Hello Charming

 

It's great to hear you had a lovely holiday.  My husband had NASAH in May 2019, we have just returned from a 2.5 week driving holiday to visit family 1200km away.  He managed to do a lot of the driving, I probably let him do too much, but he has paid for it since coming home.  

 

He spent last week sleeping/feeling in a brain fog and having worse headaches.  I think while we were away he had to maintain a higher level of focus, and touring around and talking with people to catch up takes a lot of energy,  and his body and brain were finally able to relax when we got home, which is when he felt exhausted.   I told him he needed a holiday after our holiday.

 

He has started to feel improved after 7 days of rest.  Hoping you come good soon too.

 

Veronica x

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Limitations and changes are in your life whatever your state of health. In the case of SAH though, they become more acute and are imposed suddenly when you aren't expecting any.  Change happens to us all but usually slowly through the ageing process and that makes us more able and willing to deal with them as an accepted practice.

 

However, when we have a SAH that change happens abruptly when we are less willing to accept it and we somehow feel cheated of our 'normality,' whatever that is or may mean.

 

Change happens to all of us. It's how you handle it that counts. It can be a mental change or a physical change and in some cases, both.

 

If you have an accident you accept it has happened and take steps to rectify it ie, put antiseptic and a plaster on your leg, or go to hospital or the dentist for treatment.  You may end up with a small scar but that doesn't stop you doing what you always did after a period of healing. If the injury is more severe, you may end up with a limp and you adapt to the new you. You can't run like you used to so you walk more or you find a means of transport that suits your needs.

 

With SAH, your brain has been injured and it needs time to recover just like any other part of your body. Usually it will take more time and you go on a voyage of discovery about what you can and can't do.  The thing is, you will find other things to do, perhaps not what you did before, or maybe not to the same degree, or you will do what you did but in an adapted fashion.  

 

The difficult bit is to find, within yourself, acceptance that this has happened to you, that you can't turn back the clock, and that with a few changes to attitude, adaptations to the physicalities of what you did, and do now, you can overcome and go on to lead a fantastic life. 

 

Obviously, it can be more difficult in some cases than others, but with the help of those around you, that indomitable human spirit can overcome and/or adapt to many things.

 

I myself have short term memory problems and I was told to avoid contact sports or things that would greatly increase my blood pressure, like stress for instance.

 

I am nine years out and still lead a worthwhile life, grateful for the second chance I got - repayment to the wonderful surgeon and doctors, nurses and other staff who did not write me off, and helped me get back on my feet. I look on it as a duty almost, to lead a fulfilled life. I'm having a great time, see my grandchildren grow up. Wow, it takes my breath away when i think about it.

 

It's not all great, and it can be difficult at times, but I'm still here. It's been a long road, but the journey was well worth the end results. I hope you find that peace too.

 

Best wishes

 

Good luck.

 

Macca

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Hi Macca...your words are very powerful...I am seeking "grateful"...some days I see it and others I don't seem to be able to find it anywhere...but still I am looking for it ...thank you for your inspirational words...they are so helpful..

Jean

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Thank you Jean - it's just the voice of experience really. I've been there and in the early days especially it's difficult to come to terms with the 'new me.'  Only with time do you develop new ways of doing things and new thinking - usually because there is no other real choice.

 

As in all walks of life you make the best of what you have, concentrate on getting better and being a positive rather than a negative influence on your nearest and dearest.  The payback from them will reward you tenfold at least.

 

Good luck Jean, keep plugging away - you'll get there!

 

Macca

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