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Volunteers Needed


Karen
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The University of Oxford Centre for Functional MRI of the Brain (FMRIB)

are looking for volunteers to take part in their research. Volunteers include people who have had strokes and people who have not had strokes. If you would like to find out more about participating in their research then they would like to hear from you. (This research isn't open to those that have had a SAH and have coils/clips etc)

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Please email us at recovery@fmrib.ox.ac.uk

Or ring us on 01865 222799

Or write to us at:

Stroke Recovery

FMRIB Centre

John Radcliffe Hospital

Headington

OX3 9DU

www.fmrib.ox.ac.uk

Recovery after stroke

What do we do?

Although stroke is the most common cause of adult disability in the UK, research on stroke recovery and rehabilitation is limited. We use cutting edge brain imaging techniques to understand how the brain adapts following stroke.

We find that patterns of activity change as the brain tries to recover. Understanding how these patterns change can help guide development of new rehabilitation approaches. We use brain stimulation techniques to try to improve outcome following stroke

Techniques

Transcranial Stimulation

Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) is the application of very weak electrical currents to modulate the activity of the brain. We are testing whether this can help improve recovery following a stroke.

Neuroimaging

We use magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques to study the brain after stroke. This provides us with pictures of brain structure and allows us to measure brain function. The University of Oxford has state of the art MRI technology that allows us to image the brain in very fine detail

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Hi Gill,

Yes, there will be quite a few people that probably wouldn't be able to take part, as from what I've read, there is a certain amount of health criteria that you need to be able to meet in order to participate, so would imagine that this will limit the amount of volunteers from this site.

Haha Sandi! :lol: Think that they're paying for all reasonable travel expenses, not sure if they would agree to a flight though ... :lol:

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All very confusing - don't think that they want Anni SAH - see my response from them below:

Dear Sami,

Thankyou for expressing an interest in our research. Unfortunately, becauseyou have had a coil fitted, we would be unable to use you in our currentresearch project because of the use of MRI scans; we would be concerned aboutthe strong magnetic fields causing the coil to move.

With best wishes,

Claire

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Hi Sami,

Yes, I think that your right and they're probably only really looking for non-aneurysm type stroke or the type of stroke caused by a clot. I've only just finished reading the patient information sheets that were sent to me regarding this research and I think that the scanner session is an hour long and there's lots of other health criteria to meet alongside that. I doubt that there will be many on here that are actually suitable candidates to participate and it looks as though you need to have a stroke affected limb.

If anybody is interested in this research, I can forward the patient information sheets onto them via email before they make contact with Oxford Uni and I am happy to do so, even if you just want to have a look. PM me with your email address.

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Hi all

FYI - I emailed to ask for more info but have received the following reply;

"Thank you for expressing an interest in our research. Unfortunately, because you have had a coil fitted, we would be unable to use you in our current research project because of the use of MRI scans; we would be concerned about the strong magnetic fields causing the coil to move"

Kel

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Here's the answer guys ...

Yes there are 2 reasons - whilst the coils are platinum and would be safe for the MRI, they cause image artefacts that are problematic for our research. Also, as you have seen from our information sheet, we conduct brain stimulation and we cannot do this on people with coils. We would be concerned about a number of things such as the coil heating up. Sorry about the confusion - the study was designed originally for people who have had a stroke, rather than an SAH.

Having said that, a study is currently being designed for SAH survivors, if you do have people who are particularly interested in taking part in some research.

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I'm still confused over whether or not an SAH is a stroke. She says 'people who have had a stroke, rather than a SAH'. It really bugs me that it's not clear. Some say it is and some say it's not. We won't answer the question here but I just want the world to know that the confusion regarding it really bugs me! :lol:

Sandi K.

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Hi Sandi,

It bugs me too! greatly! aargh! I think that when she says, those that have had a stroke, she's talking about Thrombotic Stroke (clot) which most people widely seem to perceive as the only cause of a stroke.

For definition of a stroke see: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stroke which is any loss of blood supply to the brain, caused either by a blockage or haemorrhage ... I must admit, that I do find it odd when the medics don't understand it themselves and something that I've met on many occasions from medical professionals since starting this site. I find it so frustrating that there's this confusion. See also http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Subarachnoid_hemorrhage

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Hi skippy,

In your reply from the UNI they said they would be concerned about the coils moving because of the strong magnetic fields. This is a little disturbing, as I have had two MRI scans since having my coils fitted and there was no mention of any risk. They ask you to fill out a form before the scan where you declare all previous operations and procedures. On both occasions I declared my coiling operations of 2005 and 2010. Has anyone else had a scan since coiling?

It's a bit worrying.

Bill x

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Hi, I have had 3 MRI scans. One after original coiling, one 9 months later and one last wednesday after a second coiling on Tuesday. I was not told of any danger of the coils moving and I'm sure that I've read somewhere that the coils used will not be affected by the magnets. Hope this is right, I'll try and find the article.

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Guy's, I wouldn't be spooked and start worrying by what's been said or take it literally . ... it's a blanket standard, one size fits all, copy and paste reply that's been sent to everybody that's enquired (it could have been worded better though!) and they are unable to take anybody that has been coiled or clipped .... plus alongside, they would have to carry out the brain stimulation process and this may cause coils to heat up... which wouldn't be good for any of us!

Don't start getting worried about MRI scans as there is no need to do so, as an individual patient you will have been assessed as to whether your aneurysm whether coiled or clipped, stented is suitable to undergo MRI's and as far as I know, it's extremely unlikely coils will move or become dislodged .... I've had quite a few scans since my coiling, still have a neck left on it, but my coils haven't moved and I will have to have more MRI's in the future to check the coiling and the size of the neck.

Please don't read anything into the reply that was given or worry yourself.

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Yes, I think the whole thing has been a little confusing.

Bill I've had four scans since my SAH - all MRI/MRA and have declared them to be platinum and as we were scanned at the same hospital you can rest assured that they were safe.

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Just a hunch here, I wonder if sometimes those that are doing the up front communications for these studies are surprised at the level if detail we know? For example, the blanket reply back about the coils and the stroke/SAH would probably be accepted by the general public without question or concern. But we all know a lot more about the insides of our heads and blanket replies just leave us with more questions! Not the fault of the research company, how would they know that this bunch is really a pot of gold when it comes to knowing about brains and recovery. We're just waiting to be found for the right study!

Sandi K.

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