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I am new to this. Was just discharged from hospital after 8 days in intensive care. (Im in the US and are words may be different).

My bleed was Nov 8th. Anyway, no aneurism found on mult studies. Bleed was perimesencephalon, no deficits but the usual headaches and weakness.

 

I want to thank all for your posts, have been hanging on every word.

 

Only questions i might have are:

 

1) Best pain meds for this? 

 

2) When back to work? (im a doctor in a stressful job)

 

3)  Is my career over ?? (that is what scares me most.

 

4)any other tips or tricks from all of you? things you would have done differently?

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frmertd, welcome to BTG.

 

1) As we are not medically qualified we are unable to give medical advice re meds. All I can suggest is for you to take what is prescribed and if that doesn't work see your consultant and request to try something different. It will be trial and error to see what works for you. The advice given here to help with the headaches is to drink lots of water to keep you hydrated. In most cases it does help although you will still need medication that works for you.

 

2) Recovery is an individual thing. Usually it is very slow but sure and you may or may not achieve the same level as you were prior to the SAH. Take baby steps, do not try to rush your recovery or you may find yourself going backwards. As for returning to work, that is an individual thing, listen to your body. It is also wise to arrange a phased return, don't jump into it head on.

 

3) Only time will tell if your career is over.  Many members have returned to their professions, some with contractual adjustments regarding working hours. You just have to see what works for you. Don't give up.

Some years ago we did have a member who was a doctor and as far as I can remember they did return to work.

 

Best wishes for a full recovery and please stay in touch. Your experience may well help others in the same situation.   

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Thank you very much for your assistance. I have read thoroughly the posts here and received some great tips regarding healling, work, and what to expect from this over the next yr.

 

Thanks for your help. Already, early in this, I have noted things predicted here. For instance, the fact that you Look normal makes people think you Are normal.

 

I keep hearing going back to work too early may give you setbacks. The need to "protect yourself" with silence and silent areas. Will continue to follow this.

 

 

Edited by Karen
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Hi. About going back to work. I've returned back to work one month after SAH and I wouldn't do it again. My doctor said I should stay at home for at least another month but I was bored :-) It was impossible for me to work (I'm a consultant) normally as I was extremely tired almost all the time and it lasted until 8 months post SAH. Since then I could say I'm more or less as I was before the stroke. I can even do sports like I used to do before. 

 

Keep in mind you will be much better after sevear months but improvement is not linear. Sometimes after few months you will feel worse than few weeks after stroke but you should accept it and don't panic. I wish you all the best.

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Hello! I think it is very individual when you go back to work. I have been away from work now for almost 6 months and I feel like I am climbing the walls here at home. I have a the support of a brain rehab team at my hospital, consisting of a doctor, a therapist and an occupational therapist and they seem to think that 6 months is a short amount of time to return to work after an SAH (I'm in Sweden so this may be different from what is recommended somewhere else).

 

They keep telling me that returning to work too early may give you setbacks, which you also mentioned that you have heard. I guess they have treated many patients so they probably have the statistics on this, so I am listening to their advice not to rush back to work. (But it still makes me frustrated and I am hoping to do a few hours a week at work starting December). Anyway, I would say listen to your body and brain, I think only you will know when you are ready to go back to work.

 

Take care!

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FRM, 

 

Try not to be in a hurry to go back to work  get yourself at least 75% better, it is a long slow process, there'll be days when you can take on the world but then Wham back to bed you go.

 

I can only speak from my experience I had an SAH 4 with Ventriculitis, Sepsis and Hydrocephalus .

 

Just now you are a survivor and keep happy as I found that a smile and singing helps, sounds daft but no stress !! whatsoever plus I've always wanted to tell a Doc what  to do  ha ha  xx

 

Keep well and for the odd pains in head that come and go I take paracetamol.   Keep a positive attitude also it is a must !! 

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Hi FRM,

 

you will know from being a doctor how the impact  of having blood in the sub arachnoid space is not a great thing for memory and cognitive function but I also imagine you will have characteristics that will encourage you to push forward and test limits. That's ok but go steady with it. 

 

You may may find it worth keeping a diary, ( some good online ones) which let you track how you are feeling and what runs down your batteries fast. 

 

Back to to work is very much based on each individual but I think whilst you are finding the effects of the bleed it is best to put plenty of rest banks in the day when you do. That's quiet and no stimulation. 

 

We have had doctors herwho have returned to work after a SAH. I will try and find a link for you. 

 

My advice is go at your own pace but try to find your warning signals and heed them. I have a friend you is a neurologist and she suggested I think in terms of traffic lights and that has helped me. I try not to run any red lights, if I need to stop I stop. It's important for my well being, emotional , pain wise and physically .  I am back at work post my SAH but life is different. So no I don't think your career is over just maybe you have to re- evaluate goals and remember you have had a bleed and be considerate. 

 

Take baby steps, build your strength slowly but steady and good luck. 

 

The link to a previous members experience of return to work as a doctor 

 

Edited by Daffodil
edited to add link
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You guys are awesome! I very much appreciate all of your help. After listening to many of you, i kind of put a 2 month rule for back to work. My shifts are 24 hrs long, very stressful, and if i screw up, people can die. There are concerns about coworkers saying i'm not up to par anymore. Will listen to your stoplight analogy very closely! Thanks for the help.

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Hi

i think your plan of back to work in 2 months is a little ambitious especially with long shifts like you do. 

 

Consider giving yourself a bit longer and try and phase back. Hopefully as you are in the medical profession they will be keen to help you. 

 

Glad uou are enjoying the site, just take it easy and be kind to yourself. 

 

Clare xx

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I went back to a stressful job after a long period of sickness. I, too, was climbing the walls whilst I was off.  One of the things I did, only when I felt able, and for short periods, was to start re-reading things relevant to my job, such as training manuals, circulars, newspaper articles.  I also kept in touch with people (friends) I worked with to keep in touch with what was going on, but I did that in the evenings when they weren't in work.

 

It was a kind of therapy, I guess, and it was actually quite nice to have the time to do these things that you can't do whilst you are rushing round at work.

 

I found that useful to make sure I was still up to date and capable mentally to return to my job when I eventually did go back.  You may also want to start thinking about how you can re-structure what you do so you can better handle the stresses and strains of your job.

 

Analyse your processes and tasks, ie What can you change? What can you delegate? What can you get rid of, and so on?  When you actually sit down with pen and paper, you will be amazed at what you can come up with to make your life easier.

 

If you do it though, be mindful that you don't substitute, or take on board more things to fill up any slack you create.  The slack is what you want to make life easier for yourself so don't go taking it up!

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Thanks so much for your advice. Just to give followup. The neurointerventionalist says im doing well. Im happy with my new lease on life, connecting with old relatives like i should have yrs ago. Seeing all the little nephews and nieces,again as i should have. Reading the Bible and thanking God for each day. The doctor says risk of rebleed =1% , and he has never seen it (yeah!!!!)

 

Headaches and weakness keep me from working, but as i learned from this wonderful website, this is normal. No sex or masturbation for 3 months. When he said that i wanted a 2nd opinion (just kidding, bad joke, i know,lol)he said likely 3 months off work. When the headaches get bad, percocet helps a lot! im trying not to get addicted but tylenol and percocet do work well. I recommended to the doc he tell his patients about this website and told him how amazingly helpful all of you have been. I literally have read all the threads and posts and learned so much, and importantly, that i am not alone.

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Because of your post I joined the forum. I am a 66 year old Physician asst working in the Alzheimer's cl.  

 

My event was 9-1-17 unprovoked. I had an EVD in place for 18 of the 21 days in neuro icu.  I lost 22 pounds, very sleep deprived and had increased vasospasm about day15.  

 

Much of the time frame has been told to me over and over.  My point is I still have blank spots in my memory and periods of confusion 3 months later.  There were times I passed by the couch and occupied for 1-2 hours.  

 

Fatigue was major whereas headache was not so bad.  I slept some days for 16 hours. Because of this event I plan on retiring.  I don't feel comfortable returning to the job I really enjoyed.  YOU need to listen to your body and your loved ones.  

 

I'm sure our positions are vastly different, however as a clinician, and what I know about this type of stroke, you need more time.  I have neuro surgery appt next week.  

 

Expect he may recommend a neuropsychologist evaluation. I'm all for it.  I hope this helps and didn't overstep.  

 

I am 90% now. You will achieve the same with judicious patience. Good luck. 

Edited by Don
Neurosurgical follow up 12-6. At my f-u appointment I saw the doc who had only seen me 1-2 times in the hospital
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Hi Don,

 

I remember nothing about my SAH, and long term memory is brilliant but short term is so so bad.  Hubby goes to me "Yes Win you told me that"  In other words not again Win lol !!

 

Listen to your brain and body, if you feel tired rest up xx 

 

It is a slow process and I forgot my Dad had died !! I told my Sisters to tell Dad I'll be up to see him !!  Address  I couldn't remember.  We will get there eventually but not in a few weeks !!

 

Long process but try not to stress and I always sing as it keeps my memory active,  but my poor Family ha ha as my singing is not all that xx 

 

Be happy and smile when possible and think of happy times xxx  Good Luck xx 

Winb143 alias Win Keep drinking water it helps xxxx 

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Thanks Don for your story. Jeez , you were in neuro ICU for 21 days????? That must have been terrible. My 7 days seems frivolous, but it was SO HARD.  I have similiar problems, huge sleep wake cycle disturbances. Last night i was up from 2-11 a.m! then slept all day. This needs to improve. I cannot work like this. People just nonchalantly say "I gave up my career, or i couldn't do my job" .

 

But this cannot be the case for me! Being a doctor is my life. It took 14(?) Years of work to get here, and now God is ripping it away from me???? I cannot live without being a doctor, it is who I am, not just "work". I'm obviously frustrated,  but 4 weeks out is very early. My plan is wait 3 months, then reassess my abilities. thanks for posting everyone, I really,really,really appreciate your stories-advice.

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HI I think your plan to wait 3 months then to re-evaluate is a good idea. You are so early i nyour recovery at the moment and a lot can change in 3 months. You may not be able to return to your previous levels of work at that point but you may be able to do some hours and return to your passion. 

 

For the time being rest, relax and drink plenty of water.

 

Good luck!

 

Clare xx

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Thanks, i keep telling myself "you are only 4 weeks out, take a chillpill!"  Multiple times per day i sit and brood about my future life. I get depressed, sometimes cry, then go for a walk. 4 weeks, that is nothing in the whole scheme of things, but it feels like a year. I remember when my hospitalization was ending. All these new patients were being flown in in helicopters. I remember thinking "this place is like a factory for brain bleeds!" It was weird. How could the world have places like this.

 

I remember thinking it must be hard on the staff. I wanted to talk to them, the new patients. I wanted to let them know what they are in for. Even now, i think of the people just starting this. The doctor told me to quit overthinking things and relax. I cry and brood a lot. But i thank God so much i survived. I taught my 6 year old nephew how to hit a golf ball today. I keep thinking this almost didnt happen. I think and brood too much. But im alive, and grateful to God.

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Hi,

 

I have a very high stress job.  I am not saving lives but I am responsible for a very high profile program.  I  have always worked with numbers and was pretty darn good at my job. Not bragging, well, maybe a little.  😀  The thing of it is, I'm not so good anymore.  I still do my job but it takes me longer.  In the beginning I was a beaten down mess.  I went back too soon and paid the price with ferocious headaches and fatigue.  People kept telling me to power through but they had no idea of the price I was paying.  This is not a broken toe.  My brain broke but to the world I looked like a well oiled machine.

 

There is no magical  day  and time when all will click and be good again.  There is no magical pain med either.  Been there with many  and done with minimal success.  But little by little you will come back to almost normal and remember who you were and who you are now.

 

Take  your time.  These things are not to be rushed.

 

iola

 

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Very well said Iola. 

 

One of the most important `rules` for a better recovery couldn`t be put any clearer.

 

 

Subs

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Frmertd my husband is now nearly 11 weeks post NASAH And understands how you feel completely.  He has built up our small business over the past 25 years and doesn’t want to see it all go bust due to the fact he can’t work as much as he used to.  He’s doing only about 4 hours a day at the moment, he started just doing 2 hours, but feels stronger now to do more.  He’s main anxiety was the fact The was getting fatigued and worried about how the business would end up and the fact he has several people who work for us and depend apron him for their living.  

 

But he’s getting there takes each day as it comes is now 2 weeks down the line with the medication the doctor gave him for this and feeling loads better.  If he feels tired he rests but just recently he has managed to do far more than he could a couple of weeks ago.  He was hospitalised for over 2weeks and says he is very lucky to have survived.  He started off reading so many negative comments on other sites but then we found this site and it has been lovely to read all the positive outcomes from these lovely people because when we left hospital nothing is really told to you about the recovery.  

 

Hopefully you will improve as my husband as done and still is sending positive thoughts your way

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There is no definitive timeline for recovery after SAH.  Everyone is different and it needs to be remembered, in my opinion, that you have to go at your own pace, not the one anyone else wants you to go at!  Recovery is a very personal journey and you need to avoid impatience and let your body and your brain take their time to heal properly.

 

If you go back too soon, your body will soon tell you in very blunt fashion and you may set yourself back weeks or months.  So go back when you are ready, not when you want to or because you feel the need to.  The best answer is to do it right, first time.  That means taking your time and giving your body the proper time to heal.

 

There is no reason why you shouldn't continue in your profession as long as you are not endangering anyone else.  Take your time, and when you do go back, be kind to yourself and go back on a phased return and don't take on too much, too soon.

 

Good luck,

 

Macca

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According to my friendly neurologist, you have to find the cause of the disease, the anatomy of the vascular system, family history for sure. He said really need to know why it happened.

 

He also said to stay away from opiates, to use acupuncture, dry needling. He recommends baby steps and to start working six hours shifts first.

 

My hubby has a nephew with aneurysm at age 37. Now he's slowly back to work

 

I m a partner in a primary care group for many years and work many hours. Hubby is a psychiatrist and work for the state hospital. It is not easy to work even when we are healthy and I can’t imagine working with SAH.

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Hi

 

 One thing I would like to add to this thread, having been in the health service for over forty five years and having to care for my partner who never gave up.

 

I have met many a doctor who have become patients due to various reasons, but one thing seems to be a main thread throughout their illness, is that they make the worst patients ever, because they want to get better as fast as they can and put themselves at risk by doing so.

 

A haemorrhage is a different breed of injury and often poorly handled most times, due to lack of understanding post bleed and on discharge.

 

 You DO need to listen to your body, drink plenty of fluids and sleep.  Your job will still be there later on and if you take one day at a time and accept that things need to be taken slowly, you will return and be a better Doctor for it and you will have an understanding that so many drs do not have... and you will be able to pass that on in time... so listen to your body and take the lead from learning all over again and in the mean time enjoy the golfing.  

 

Good luck in your recovery

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Hi Cat,

 

I had an SAH4 in 2009 and was not given much hope but I made it.  Walking is poor but I can do things for myself which is great !! 

 

I saw my Surgeon and told him my Aunt had a bleed when I was 10 and she had big dents in her temple and he said "Too far removed".

 

I wanted to say "Well her 2 sons died of brain bleeds but left it.  I often wonder if I took after my Aunt Nell and family.  

 

I am happy to be here and am glad I can sing and smile again xx Same surgeon told me No Stress !! Always pass it on xxx lol 

 

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