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Hello- garyolly


garyolly
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Hello everyone

I suffered a SAH with Vertical cerebral dissection on the 31st May 2010.

I appear to have been very lucky in the fact that i do not seem to have any physical problems BUT like

many others here, I do not feel the same.

I have always been a very active person, name me a sport and I've tried it. Having spent many years in the Royal Navy, always working hard and playing harder, it's very hard to come to terms with whats happened.

It is obviously very early days but i find it hard to deal with the tiredness and that "fuzzy" feeling.

I have good days and bad days but thankfully not too many bad ones. My family, partner and friends have been great but I also know that this must be affecting them too.

My boss has been great throughout this so far, so it's one less thing to worry about but i drive as part of my job, the worry is still there, lurking.

Having read some of the stories of other members, i consider myself to be so lucky. Now if only i could stop crying at the drop of a hat, everything would be good.

This whole adventure has certainly made me think. All I've got to do now, is find out what I'm thinking about.......I tend to forget things.

I am sure of one thing, things are sent to try us. Well........... bring it on!

Good luck to all those people that have posted their own stories, we can get through this AND thanks to our loved ones for going through it with us. (got to stop this crying)

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Hi Garyolly,

Just thought I would say hello and welcome before retiring to bed! It's very recent for you so think you have done well to post - I wouldn't worry about the tears - it seems a common occurence - possibly due to the enormity of it all. It's good to hear you have an understanding boss. Anyway, I look forward to hearing more from you in the future and all the best in your recovery.

Sarah

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Hi Garyolly

Welcome to this site, we can all relate to not being the person we once were. Yes, it's still early days for you and recovery takes time, take it easy and get to know the new you. We are like a family here so we know how you are feeling.

Love to hear more from you when you are ready.

Take care.

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Hi Garyolly,

Welcome to the site,

Bring it on????? So soon???? Give yourself some time! You are so early in your recovery. You shold have been told. This takes a long time. Say that next year and you mite mean it. Honestly. I called friends at work , telling them "I'll see you in a fortnight". That was last June. I'm still a couch potato today! You will find this site very helpful if you look into it properly. Everyone has had a haemorrhage and all have different kinds of deficits. Every time you need to ask a question someone will respond. It's quite amazing how many people are out there who have to deal with the same issues. I hope you will get all the help you need here. ( No, that's wrong... I'm certain you will) All the best!

Sally x

Sally x

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garyolly

welcome to the site you are in the very early stages of recovery make sure you give yourself some me time its like a ship going into dry dock for a refit you have just gone through the refit stage now you moving into ironing the niggles out in the early sea trials so don't go breaking anything or it will come out of your pay book the tears we all suffer from bursting out and letting them flow i don't think anyone on here stops them flowing anymore its part of the healing process will look forwards to hearing from you in the future take care and try and have some you time

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Hi,Gary congratulations your doing really well and have a good attitude. Keep it up,let the tears flow and learn to listen to the new you! Recovery is different for us all except I think we'd all agreee on the slowly slowly pace of life we have to adopt at the beginning. It's your time, do it at your own pace and let the world carry on around you for a while it's a challenging time but with your back ground and atitude you will no doubt pull through and go from strength to strength,be kind to yourself. looking forwrd to hearing about your progress. Maggiex:-D

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Ho Garyolly

Welcome to BTG. I too had a dissecting aneurysm on my left verterbral artery. You are doing really well, it's very earyly days for you! Oh dear as for the tears - I'm 17 months post SAH and have just had a very teary week! But it hasn't been all tears for the last 17 months far from it! I agree thank goodness for famillies, their support is so important. You'll also find this "family" amazing, the support and understanding from them is second to none!

Take care.

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Welcome to BTG! I'll repeat what everyone else has said - it's such early days!! Take it easy, treat yourself kindly. My SAH was in February and I keep thinking "now I'm better", but then something will happen to remind me I'm not. I overdid it last week and ended up 2 1/2 days in bed and very tired since then... maybe NOW I'll realise I have to take it easy. Doh!!! So, keep smiling (through the tears) and you'll get there. Take care.

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Hi Gary

Welcome to the site. I don't think you realise how well you're doing! It's amazing that you are able to email this soon into recovery. I'm guessing your previous fitness is benefiting you well right now. Well done you.

I had my SAH on the 21st November 2009, so I'm further into recovery than you. Whilst no two people are the same, I'll share with you some of my experiences. It may help.

If I had my time back again, I wouldn't be so hard on myself. I wasn't the most patient and wanted to get back to where I was almost immediately. It is hard when your life changes overnight and it takes time for the emotions to catch up. I was a bit 'rage against the machine' and found it hard to accept that I was no longer running marathons and training in the gym with an ex marine!

I had to lower my expectations and work within new parameters to find joy in things again. My long runs of twenty miles plus on Saturday mornings, changed to a mile walk initially (in March) and I have built this up gradually; running little sections of my walk, to eventually being able to run a few miles again. (I am very slow and don't think Paula Radcliffe is too worried!)

For the next few weeks, you need to rest as much as possible. I remember how frustrating this was, but truly, you are probably suffering a considerable fatigue right now. Things which brought me happiness around the same time as your recovery was having friends visit or they'd invite me to theirs. I probably wasn't up too much else, but it will come Gary.

I remember that fuzzy feeling! It reduces, honest! It is only when you're a few months down the line and you look back at this moment that you'll appreciate how early you are into recovery. I am confident that in 6 months time, if you read a post from someone who's SAH was six weeks ago, you'll be advising them to 'hold their horses' too!

If you were like me, you will need to rest up for a few more weeks. Instead of being frustrated, look upon it as laying an important foundation stone to build your strength upon. Your sporting background will tell you that rest is an important (and neglected) area of fitness.

I am already amazed by how well you're doing.

L

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Many thanks for all of the kind words and advice. Of course i realise that i need to slow down but it's hard you know! I do take naps when my body tells me and boy does it tell me.

I have been trying to describe the "fuzzy" feeling to my girlfriend but it's odd, the best i can do is "fuzzy". I had one of the bad days today, headache and sicky feeling but lots of sleep and water seem to help.

I do have a question for everyone, Do we get called back for a review or follow up CTa at any time?

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Hello again,

I'm sorry today's been bad. Unfortunately it's normal, but I appreciate it's unpleasant. I spent most of January in bed with headaches and nausea and it just gets you down.

The only way through it is rest, rest and a bit more rest!!! Very frustrating if you are an active person by nature. You will get better, believe me. Break things down to manageable sections. Get to the end of July with as much rest as possible. Let that be your goal. Re-asses August when it arrives and if you feel better, think what realistic goals you'd like to achieve. Don't put too much pressure on yourself though, you strike me as someone who might. ;-0

My follow up Consultant's appointment was on the 9th July 2010. I have a further CT scan on the 22nd July. The reason for the scan is because I had hydrocephalus and nearly had a shunt fitted. It's this which they are more interested in assessing, not necessarily the SAH; so I'm unsure whether all SAH survivors have a CT scan. Others will have to advice you on this.

Hope tomorrow is better.

L

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Many thanks for all of the kind words and advice. Of course i realise that i need to slow down but it's hard you know! I do take naps when my body tells me and boy does it tell me.

I have been trying to describe the "fuzzy" feeling to my girlfriend but it's odd, the best i can do is "fuzzy". I had one of the bad days today, headache and sicky feeling but lots of sleep and water seem to help.

I do have a question for everyone, Do we get called back for a review or follow up CTa at any time?

I had a craniotomy and was due to be seen 2 weeks after surgery but this turned into 4 months!! (due to no space in clinic). The surgeon said that was ok, though, and indeed everything has been fine. I don't need a f/up CT because I was clipped but I believe if you had coiling they do closer follow-ups. Can you ask your surgeon's secretary?

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Thanks everyone, the reason that i asked was because i had stents fitted. My dissection was on a junction with another artery, so they had to overlap the stents. I'm sure i can remember the consultant saying something about a monthly review

to make sure that the stents are performing ok. Then again there was an awful lot of information to take in at the time. Lin-lin, me put too much pressure on myself??? Never......:-)))

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Hi Gary, hope the head is a little better today - surprising how much sleep and water can help.

I think the follow up varies according to the individual's circumstances, but I am sure you will hear from them in due course. My first appointment with the consultant was 3 months after the sah, I had another angiogram a month later. (I think I had the angio because I had severe vasospasm at the outset and they had not felt it safe to fill the aneurysm up completely with coils so needed to check it out) . I think the "fuzzy" head is a good description - which again can vary from person to person - I can't quite remember how long it lasted for me, but on the whole I have had a "normal" feeling head for the majority of the past 20 months, so don't despair - you are still in the early days.

Sarah

PS Just seen that you posted while I was typing - I did not have stents fitted so again it is completely different to my case.

Edited by kempse
noticed Gary's post!
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Hi Gary

A very warm welcome to the site and to family.

You strike a cord with me as I was in denial at first and refused to give a year of my life to recovery. I was angry, upset and feeling guilty. I didn't like the fact that my life had changed dramatically and I couldn't do all the things I could do before. You know something? Once I stopped being angry and guilty, it was easier to accept what had happened. As for crying at the drop of a hat - definitely been there, as I think we all have. It is a perfectly natural reaction given the severity of what we've been through and it does get easier.

I always say this to "newbies" - it's a long road to recovery but you're allowed to make as many pit stops along the way as you need.

You're doing the right thing by sleeping when you need to, but make sure you're drinking plenty of water too - this helps with the headaches and with the body reabsorbing the blood.

The fuzzy head thing I can relate to too - it's like your brain is wrapped in cotton wool and you're kind of looking at things through a soft haze. It passes with time and with plenty of rest.

Anything you want to ask, I'm sure there'll be someone to answer and don't be afraid to sound off your frustrations here too - so long as you don't swear lol.

Good luck with your recovery and I look forward to us being there with you every step of the way.

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Hi garyolly. Yes, welcome! As all have said, you're still in early days - and you are doing quite well!!! Do be good to yourself and rest as much as you can! I'm still learning what I can and can't do or how far to push the envelope! Trial and error method lol. I'm still in the crying stage and am finally accepting it all. Just read the post by Chris, Letter from my brain. Very helpful for me, as is this site and the people here!

Take care :)

Carolyn

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Yes garyolly....your in the right place and Welcome.

I say the right place because as your friends visit you.. they will ask "How are you.. OK?" and you'll say "Fine, a lot better". I must have said that a thousand times myself. It's like a code at times, saying the right thing. Here at BTG some are helpful and patient...some just tell it straight like me as I shoot from the hip, the difference is that these people at BTG, know what you have been through and understand....more than friends, even nurses....even Doctors will struggle at times.

Until you have been in the Water....you don't know..

So just jump in when your ready...I was in denial for years after my SAH. Then I dived in for my own recovery.

Edited by blueday
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Hi Garolly

I had my SAH 11th Dec 09 and was coiled 18th Dec, then had a follow-up appointment 10th Feb this year, and am due to have a follow-up angiogram in December... so 12 months after it all happened... whereas others have check-ups 6 months after.

I seem okay though. Still have the occassional teary day but most days I feel okay.

I made it back to the gym last week, had a new plan done on Thursday and actually worked through it all yesterday morning, and felt good after. It will be reviewed every 3 weeks and adjusted as necessary. I was at the gym for 1hr 20mins yesterday and that was when it wasn't busy so goodness knows how long the plan will take after work!?

As the others have said you just have to take each day/week as it comes and you will start to notice so many improvements over the next few months. If I look back now to 3 months ago I have recovered so much. I was scared I wouldn't be able to work full-time again, or get back to the gym, or have any energy to do anything in the evenings - but now I can do it all! (just about... I do rest when my body tells me to!). It is really hard finding the balance of not doing too much, and over-doing it, cos you don't know you have over-done it until it's been done! :crazy:

Good luck for your continued recovery

Take care

Kel

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