Jump to content

Aspirin?


Recommended Posts

Hey

I haven't been told formally that I can't take aspirin but going by the fact that I was warned not to take Ginkgo Bilboa due to its blood thinning properties, I'm assuming that I can't take aspirin. As we need our blood to clot I assume that blood thinners would not be advisable.

This is where I get confused though (or maybe I'm looking for an excuse to carry on smoking!!) but smoking makes the blood sticky and not so thin so therefore the 'bleed' shouldn't be so severe as the blood isn't rushing through the burst anuerysm. Maybeits a double edged sword - smoking causes high blood pressure, which causes SAH's but then the sticker the blood the less sever the bleed. Clutching, at and straws comes to mind!!!

TTFN

Sami xxx

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I was told that I couldn't take any blood thining agent and that includes aspirin. I always read the leaflet not with ANY medication just in case after my wife was reading through one for Bonjela (tooth/gum gel) and it actually said if you've had a brain haemorraghe not to use it...... Also there was a study that suggested a common ingredient in cold and flu remedies was directly linked to SAH in women (that ingredient hasn't been used for a number of years).

Scott

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hi,

Iwas prescribed aspirin for one month immediately after coiling op, was also on a Heperin drip which is also a blood thinner,I dont know why that was but I have since been told to avoid aspirin or anything else that thins blood. I was also told in hospital never to take any cold remedies any more. The only thing Im not scared to take is paracetamol.

Tracey.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hey

I wasn't formally told not to take Aspirin but I know its a blood thinner because Paul was told to take a small daily dose with his Warfrin when he had a heart attack about 5 years ago. Or his 'incident' as her prefers to call it as he hasn't had anything like it since and still plays football twice a week and hasn't taken any drugs for years now.

Cheers

Sami xxx

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hey here's a question.

Will we ever be able to take aspirin again? I know the atery wall eventually heals and cuts off the anuerysm (if your Sah is caused by this) so in theory if the atery wall is thick enough and back to 'normal' wouldn't we therefore be able to take aspirin again??

Just a thought.

Sami xxxx

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 years later...

Michele has been told to take asprin due to its blood thinning, also been told to stop smoking which is causing problems. She does not understand why after being told that she is at no more risk than anybody else to have anothers SAH due to the coiling and after having 4 scans that have shown no other weak blood vessels.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hi Paul

Hope Michele is doing well. Is it her G.P or the Neurosurgeon who have told her to take the Aspirin ? As for smoking obviously all medical people urge you to give up smoking and if she can she should try. Although I'm not going ot preach as I still smoke but nowhere near as many as I used to.

With regards to Aspirin it wasn't something I was prescribed after my SAH and the only time my Doctor told me to take some was before flying for 2 days either side of the flights.

Janet x

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guest mollie

Hi all.

I was told I had to take aspirin for the rest of my life. Apparently its so our blood doesn't clot so much in case of recurrences of blood clots etc I take 75mg a day and i am now wondering if its altogether safe to do so. I was also on heperin post op but only for a short time. I was also told that you have to avoid anti-inflammatories like Ibuprofen etc if you take aspirin. Got me all worried now :confused1:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hi Merrill was put on soluble aspirin after the sah, when coming home from having the shunt fitted i noticed that they had'nt prescribed aspirin again so i rang Addenbrooks and spoke to the nurse practitioner and she said that she must have aspirin because it's a thinning agent and this is needed because of the coiling and as i understand it she will stay on it,

Regards Rod

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I was told not to take Aspirin post SAH, as it thins the blood .... then again, I don't have "sticky" blood or high cholesterol.

Members really do need to ask their GP as to the reasons why, they are being prescribed Aspirin and discuss it with them, as we aren't medics.

Maybe, some members have been prescribed Aspirin to thin their blood, which decreases the risks of clots and ischaemic strokes and is of benefit to them?

We've all been told, that the likelihood of us having another SAH, is no more greater than the general population, so if you're experiencing other health problems, that put you at risk of stroke, then they would more than likely treat that just as seriously and will try to lower that risk.

I'm only guessing, but I wouldn't be too worried about being prescribed Aspirin, especially if I had "sticky" blood... but, please make an appointment with your GP and ask him or her a few questions as to "why" ..... It will put your mind at rest....

Rod, there maybe a v.good reason why Merrill was told to take Aspirin ..... contact the medics and ask the question .....

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Karen, thanks for this thread:-D Isn't it amazing how different we all are, I'm sure it must be something to do with medical history. I now feel more like cross questioning my GP. It was not him who prescribed aspirin and then Clavix for me, but now I can ask for a real explanation, as to me it has never seemed very logical! I have very low chloresterol, was in the past a smoker ( lucky me, my SAH cured that!) with the resultant high blood pressure. My BP now normal as can be and my chloresterol levels still 'well within acceptable bounds' quoting my GP there;-) Roll on when I next see him! My consultants know I am having thinners but I think, why?:wink:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hi again I've spoken to hospital this morning and the person i wanted to speak to is on holiday so will ring back next week but the person i did speak to said "there are two trains of thought on this if you have been coiled and and prescribed aspirin this will reduce the risk of another bleed if you did have another bleed then it's true to say that the blood would flow free'er but once the annis are dealt with they do not anticipate any further problems and aspirin aids the flow of the blood where a coil is, cant say that i totaly understand this but will chew it over for the week untill i talk to them again but in the meantime they told me that Merrill should continue to take the aspirin.

Rod

Link to comment
Share on other sites

i know there are two trains of thought over asprin i hope this might put things into prospective

asprin is a known blood thinning agent as has been given to certain people to thin the blood down when some of you were is hospital you were possibley given clexain which is given to prevent blood clots therefor reduceing the chance of having pulmoanery embloism because you were not as active as you were pre sah hence giving the chance of pulmoanary embolism espeacily as you were flat in bed not moving how many of you were wearing compression stockings when in hospital raiseing the risk of pe some drs swear by asprin and others draw back because the asprin does thin blood

some people benifit from a daily dose of asprin and it does in a small way what clexlain did when you were flat and immobile by all means one should always check with gp as to the pro's and cons hope this helps

Edited by paul99
spelling mistake
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I too was told to take Ibuprofen and asprin when i left hospital. I was told to take the small dose of asprin for 6 months. Which i did. I still take the odd Ibuprofen and asprin now to help bad pain....was told to take together....i did check with my GP about this. I have low blood pressure and low cholesterol. Always check with your GP or Consultant as we are not medics.

Edited by Tina
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hi Karen I was never told I couldn't take it but doesn't mean I can :lol: I take anadin ultra which have it in but never mind it gets rid of pains I ain't going to worry about it he said live my life as I would of done so that's what I do. Jess.xxx

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guest mollie

I don't take aspirin for pain relief as it's only a mild dose at 75mg I will if i remember ask the reason why i have to take it. My other pain relief is co-codamol 30/500 and 8/500 Sometimes I have to have tramadol and have even been known to have morphine when the pain is exceptionally bad.

Have to go to Walton in September and have a scan and god knows what else. I am sick of them taking me blood. Over the past 2 months I think they have taken about 8 samples and i always forget to ask the results..........lol. Can't be that bad or they would ring to see me

Hope everyone is alright

Mollie xxx

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Have just found the following article in the Daily Mail titled "A daily aspirin could be bad for you" so, thought that I would mention it on this thread, for those that are interested in reading it, click on the following link - http://www.dailymail.co.uk/health/article-1210136/A-daily-aspirin-BAD-Insurance-users-warned-regular-dose-WONT-cut-heart-attack-risk.html

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Restore formatting

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...