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My wifes SAH


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Hi my name is Steve,and I am the father of new member Loz.

My wife had an SAH on 16/01/09,which was coiled on 19/01/09,however the coil migrated and clip surgery was performed on 21/01/09.She has now been moved from our regional Neuro hospital to our local general hospital.

What is concerning me,and I am hoping someome may be able to give advice or guidence on, is that she now has short term memory loss and bouts of confusion,she feels abandond and isolated, and is worried she may be moved to a mental hospital.

Has anyone else experianced this,and is there anything we can do to help overcome this worry.

Also,what should we be looking for in terms of what the hospital staff should be doing, and what support should my wife be receiving from other proffessionals.

Thanks in advance for any help

Steve

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hi steve welcome to btg

it is very very early days yet for loz there are many members who will answer your question but it seems everyone who has survived have the same problems in varying degrees i cant really answer your question but i wish both you and loz a speedy recovery and it is a long road but with your support and loz taking it easy you will find a way through this even if its one day at a time its very early days take care

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Welcome to BTG Steve

Sorry to hear about your wife's SAH. I hope she makes a good recovery.

I cannot remember a lot of things when I had my SAH but I was told that I was very confused and I would get extremely angry, I did have short term memory loss and to be honest I still have that problem now. Each person is different but we do have similar problems.

The people who helped me the most in hospital were the physiotherapists, my leg on the left side had become weak and they helped.

I think also that hospitals care policies vary a lot too, I wasn't very happy with mine as a lot of questions were left unanswered it's only on this website that my questions were answered. Very little information is given to patient when they are discharged, a month after I had left hospital I was scared as to what now but each day is getting better but it's still frustrating as recovery can be slow.

Let us know how she is getting along. Take care.

Myra xx

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What is concerning me,and I am hoping someome may be able to give advice or guidence on, is that she now has short term memory loss and bouts of confusion,she feels abandond and isolated, and is worried she may be moved to a mental hospital.

Although I have no medical knowledge I don't think for one minute she will be moved to a mental hospital. All you are describing is a normal part of the proccess for an SAH and it is very early days. Recovery can be very slow and to the best of my knowledge many of these effects will right themselves eventually, although I still have short term memory problems, there are ways round them.

I am sure someone who has been on this forum for a while will possibly be able to advise you better. Even better speak to the doctors who are treating your wife who will be able to explain the ins and outs of the effects of a SAH.

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Hi Steve

I had my SAH in 1 Oct 2004 and I have no memory for the first 10 days or so. I do know that my short term memory was poor for around a year or so. Even now I have bouts of being forgetful. I recall confusion, anger and a real fear of never being me again. Your wife, you, Loz and the rest of your family will face many challenges over the next few months but take her recovery a day at a time and don't try to rush things.

Please let us know how she is getting on.

Kim

XX

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Hi Steve,

Welcometo BTG, a great place for advice and support. Sorry to hear about your wife's SAH, hope she is on the road to recovery.

I still over 2 years on have slight issues with short term memory and unfortunately/ fortunately probably don't remember too much about my time in hospital. Its hard to say professionals wise as I seem to get all I needed in hospital it was the aftercare I had issues with!

Keep asking questions, someone will have an idea on the answer!

Take care and look after yourself too

Laura

xx

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WELCOME STEVE

SHE IS NOT FEELING ANYTHING OTHERS HAVE NOT FELT, I THINK SOME OF THE PROBLEM IS THE MEDS YOU HAVE TO TAKE SO GIVE IT TIME, THE SHORT TERM MEMORY LOSS IS SOMETHING MANY OF US DEAL WITH AND FIND WAYS TO DEAL WITH SENSE OF HUMOR HELPS ALOT OF US, THAT IS A SMALL PRICE TO PAY TO STILL BE HERE.

BEST WISHES TO YOU AND YOUR WIFE

XXX EVELYN

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Hello Steve :) Poor you and of course your wife, there is no need at all for her to worry, as others have said she is just experiencing the things which are 'normal' for those of us with SAH. I too was in our local general hospital after being discharged from the neuro-surgical unit. There will I am certain be no question of transfer to a mental hospital, but I can understand your wife's fears, it does seem as though one is losing one's senses, but I promise, this is not the case! The easiest way to look at it is that they ( her senses) are taking a break, they have had a battering and now need to recuperate, that is simplistic and not in the least a medical opinion, but I bet there is no-one who has had an SAH who would disagree with me, and maybe we are the experts :wink: It takes time to improve, and there is no real way of estimating the time , it is more a case of 'how long is a piece of string', but please go to her and tell her she is as normal as all the rest of us and not at all in danger of any mental health problem. Thinking of you all :)

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Hi Steve

Welcome to BTG sorry to hear about Loz it is very early days still for her. The first few months are the hardest and the problems with short term memory are worse then as well.

Please keep us up to date with her progress and anything you want to know just ask. Wishing Loz a good recovery but remember to look after yourself as well.

Janet x

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Hi Steve, welcome to a great site. I cant remember anything about the first month and even after that is a bit hazy! I was very confused and did some interesting things! when I came home after 6 weeks I had to 'learn' things again - like remembering to turn the cooker off! I was also very emotional and tearful, it will get better but takes time - everyday is a bonus!

take Care

Caroline

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Hi Steve

Welcome to the site and to our wonderful family.

I can only say that what your wife is going through mirrors exactly how I was. I was confused, didn't know where I was and couldn't remember what had happened apart from the fact that I was in masses of pain.

As for the short term memory loss - yes, it's normal. Mine has only started improving in the last year or so. She will feel isolated as it a very traumtic thing to go through - it's the main reason I searched for a site like this - that horrid feeling of not knowing what is happening and that no one understands how you feel.

Give her my best and I hope she continues with a great recovery.

TTFN

Sami xxx

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dear all

i have to admit you have bought a tear to my eye,how all of you who have suffered sah still have the kindnest and thoughtfulness to consider helping other people, like me, who are in the early days of trying to understand and help my wife.

it seems a small thing to say, but a big thank you to you all,and may your recoveries continue.

can anyone help by letting me know exactly which DVLA form i should be completing for tina? :?

steve

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Steve, the Salford/Wessex website is also v.good for basic info ..... click on http://www.srht.nhs.uk/patient--visitor ... ry-advice/

A lot of us that were treated at the Wessex Neuro, were given this info in a booklet that we could take home and read. It's fairly basic info, but when you've had a SAH, it's about all that your brain can absorb! .... but, would definetly say that it's worth printing off for your wife to read, once she's feeling better or has left hospital.

The Brain and Spine Foundation also have v.good SAH info, that you can download and print off. Their website details are under "useful websites" on the BTG homepage.

I don't know whether you've looked at our homepage, but there's plenty of members SAH accounts to read ..... it might help to "normalise" what your wife is experiencing.... and we're all still here to tell the tale! :wink:

Life can seem very topsy turvy after a SAH ..... it takes a while to get some sort of normality back into your life and come to terms with the event, but it will happen and life does get better.

K x

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Hi Steve

Warm welcome to the site

I had a terrible short term memory problem, still do, but its better now. I was scared that people I knew, would'nt want me anymore, the way I was - silly I know, but thats what I thought.

You just keep telling, repeating things and talking about stuff, this is all such early days....

look after yourself take care

Louise.x

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thanks for your help with DLVA guys.

Could I ask a question of the spouses of SAH suffers.There is every chance I will have to return to work soon,how did other spouses cope having to leave their loved ones at home for the first time, and what if any proffessional support did or should you have received at home?

The second question is,thankfully I am being told that Tina is physically capable of returning home, however,my concern is that there has been no assesment of her current mental capabilities to fully look after herself on return home. Who do you consider she should be seeing before she is discharged,to ensure her best well being at home.and what support should I be looking for?

Thanks

Steve

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Guest sarah c

Hello Steve,

I had my SAH eight years ago this January. The only check that I had to make sure I could go home was if I could walk up a flight of stairs. When I came out of hospital after this my husband had two weeks at home with me, then my mum had a week with me, and my mother-in-law had the last week with me. They all did not want to leave me at home on my own but knew they had to do it at some time, I used to get lots of phone calls during the day and when I think about it I had family and friends coming in neally every day. As for any aftercare from the hospital that was non-existent. Anyway I wish you and your wife lots of love and best wishes for the future and I hope this has helped.

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Hi Steve and welcome to behindthegray.

I was seen by 2 doctors at my local hospital before discharge (I don't think they were neuro docs) and was only asked to walk around my bed which I could just about manage and also asked if there was anyone at home to look after me ... I got the impression that the local hospital just wanted rid of me. My wife only worked a couple of hours a day at the time, but she took a week off work, and would you believe it, the second day she went back, I was taken ill again and blue lighted back to hospital. I was given no professional support at home (didn't really need it), they just told me to contact my GP or the hospital where I was treated (Wessex Neuro, Southampton) if I had any problems.

Regards

Keith

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I was the same as everyone else ..... my husband took a week off when I came out.....but, no professional help and I could barely walk. I don't personally know of anybody that has had help around the house etc. However, in the first few weeks, Eric and the kids took care of the household chores and cooking etc. At first, I could barely pour a bowl of cornflakes, as didn't have any energy and had eyesight and balance problems. I was also on meds for seizures that knocked me for six too.

We did the grocery shopping online when my husband went back to work, or should I say that I did. I could just about manage to have a shower by myself. The hospital did advise him to put up grab rails in the bathroom and loo .... I definetly needed them and they helped, or I would have needed help to get off the loo and I'm afraid that I'm far too proud to ask for that! I still occasionally use the one near the shower, if my balance is a bit off.

Somehow, you manage to cope ..... get family to help, if you have them around you or if your kids are old enough to help out, then I'm certain that they won't mind doing their bit ..... I'm sure that they wouldn't mind popping in or helping out with some chores, to ease the pressure or just keeping their eye on Tina. It takes a bit of organisation and pre-planning, especially in the first few weeks and then you will find that your wife will be able to cope with a little bit more, as the time goes on.

If you're working, then I would just make sure that you leave her with some sandwiches for lunch etc., so that she can just rest, when you're not there ..... most of us have mobile phones now and that's a comfort too .... The first few weeks are certainly a bit topsy turvy ..... but that doesn't last forever and normality, bit by bit, will start to return.

K x

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