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I'm a recent addition to the community having had a SAH on 5/4/20 caused by a rupture of a 6mm anuerysm in the MCA lateral striate, this was succesfuly coiled 6/4/20.

 

I was then in ICU in St Georges, Tooting for a few days and came home 18/4/20.

 

I am so glad I found his forum/communitty, it is really helping me with learning and prespective; I feel very lucky.

 

Whilst the "event" did occur on my wife's new Peleton, bought to excercise during lockdown, I was perviously a very strong, fit guy in my late 40's; seeing a strength and conditioning coach twice a week and training for competion.  This was somewhat unexpected!

 

I also run my own business and last year was president of my trade body, so I am used to living life at 100% however have never really suffered from stress, had low blood pressure and low RHR.

 

Hearing peoples's stories is SOOOO helpful and really helping me give myself permission to take it easy, listen to my body and take my time.

 

Things I am struggling with are:

 

-Double vision

-Going to bed expecting to feel better in the morning and then not

-Aching muscles, I am literally wasting away and have lost 7 KG! (I started at 97 though!)

 

Luckily though, I have a geat business partner, lovely family and I can now walk around the block, so getting more active.  My teeange kids have to walk the dog, then walk the dad!

 

Love to you all and thankyou once again.

 

Mark

 

 

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Hi Mark

 

So glad that you found us and are able to get comfort and understanding already.

 

You are, however, very early in your recovery so please don't expect too much too soon.  I lost over a stone in 3 days hospital stay and my muscles wasted away very quickly leaving me feeling weak, dizzy and easily tired.  Make sure that you're drinking plenty of water and, most importantly, listen to your body. 

 

Sleep patterns will naturally be disturbed, your brain has been injured and it can't stop working so it will also get fatigued - for me to the point where I got so tired I couldn't sleep.  The way around this is to sleep when you need to, not when you should.

 

It's good that you're trying to stay active, but don't overdo it too quickly - your body will definitely let you know about it.

 

My favourite saying is "it's a long road to recovery, but you can make as many pit stops along the way as you like".  Remember, its not so much about the destination, but the journey.  No matter how little the steps are, they are progress and they mount up.

 

Take care :-) 

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It's only come with experience Mark :-)

 

I was in your position nearly 14 years ago and if wasn't for the BTG and a very patient husband, I'm not sure where or how I'd be now.

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Hello Mark and also a warm welcome to BTG.

 

So glad you found the site early. With so much information from personal experiences available you will benefit greatly as you 'recover'.

 

You have already identified the key attitude to adopt.  Rest well, accept that life has changed and slowly over the coming months adapt and respect your brain and body. 

 

Not an easy target for someone who has enjoyed living in 'the fast lane' 

 

When you do eventually consider back to work ... a phased return kept under constant review ... and patience to accept that it may well need many changes along the way.

 

You are beginning one of the most important challenges of your life. 

Best wishes in how you tackle it.

 

Also  wishing your wife and family, and your business partner the patience and strength they will need as they adjust their lives too.

 

Take care and keep well hydrated.

 

Subs

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Hi Mark

 

Warm welcome glad that you found us.

Sami/Skippy's right we all 'get-it' and understand, you are early in the recovery keep well hydrated, rest (yes you may not like it) and also listen to your body when you feel you've have done too much give into it and 'rest' 

 

slow and easy does it.

I hope you find the site helpful.

 

take care

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Hiya Mark,

 

I sat here thinking "Well Win this is it" I was scared !! 

 

My Daughter told me about this site and after being told I'd never walk again and to put me in a home my hubby said "No Way"   

 

Needed a shunt put in !! which woke me up!! 

 

Found people on here who could laugh again. This site was a God  send to me I realised there was a life after a brain bleed, and got my smile back.

 

Learnt a lesson don't give up on yourself  and argue if they give you a balloon to tap..My Physio !!! lol ..Keep well and keep fighting the good fight.

All the best 

Win xxxx

 

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Welcome to btg xxx

 

Its still early days for you rest whenever you need drink plenty of water xxx

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Welcome to BTG Mark , glad to hear you are recovering and learning the new way of your life. 
 

As others have said take things slowly and drink plenty of water. I echo what Subs says that a phased return to work is best.

Not sure if you work from home but if you do make sure you are very disciplined when you restart. it’s very easy to overstep things without realising you are doing it when work is concerned. your brain will soon tell you though! Set yourself time limits and stick to them building up slowly. 
 

Physical exercise is good too. I have managed to get myself back to running and the gym. Just take it slowly - you’ll get back on that Peleton bike soon! 
 

You will get used to the new normal, takes a while but with patience you’ll get there! 
 

Keep us updated on your progress 😀

 

Clare xx

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Thanks ever so much for all of your kind and inspiring words!

 

I’m off the Nomodipine today, so hopefully a bit more return to normality and no more waking every 4 hours!

 

Little steps......

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Hi Mark,

 

When you next go in for a check up, ask them to check your hormone levels.  That feeling worse than you did when you went to bed is well known to me, and I was shown to be deficient in hormone levels and I now have replacements.

 

I'm not saying that's it in your case, because you just might need time as your event was so recent, I'm just saying it's worth mentioning and having them checked.

 

In my case it went on and on and on, and my levels were checked and hey presto, I'm on HRT for life now! (Remember that song? (Man I feel like a woman! Shania Twain I think it was - I don't laugh at it now!)

 

Good luck mate!

 

Macca

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Welcome to the group. And also welcome to the slow movement.its a pretty good thing, you can see and learn more as you take your time. A quality thing! 

 

so there is onesilver lining straight off which is brain injury and SAH gives you a different perspective and level of resilience when it comes to living through a pandemic. And you have a benefit of a quieter world right now and that’s a very good thing for the brain when it’s hurting. 

 

Glad to hear youve finished nimodpene, that’s a milestone and now you need to give yourself some space and kindness to heal. No need to rush to be back to what it was before, current circumstance is proving that to a lot of folk right now, it’s ok to just be And do what feels ok today for your brain.  it’s hurting And healing and in the next weeks I’m not going to lie it will knock you on your bum I expect with how it can make you feel. Come here if it does for reassurement but each day have quiet time, eat well and often, move then rest, drink lots of water and celebrate each highlight in a day, taking each one day at a time. 

 

ICU I felt when i was there was full of love , that’s  comforting to me right now knowing that people in there have to weather that experience all alone, so well done you for going through that without visitors . You were amongst the sickest and you came home , that is a very special thing. Cherish that and go on from here. Slowly . Steadily. Find a new balance, it will Be there. 

Daff 

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Hello Mark

 

I’ve missed this already, not looking at the right folders. Well done!

 

Looking at this, you have nothing to worry about. Time will likely give you every thing back;

 

- Double vision

This can take well over a year to get fixed. My eyesight is totally normal after over a year. Any wine takes me back, nearing 3 degrees or 5 degrees depending on how much!

 

-Going to bed expecting to feel better in the morning and then not

Sleep always helps!

 

-Aching muscles, I am literally wasting away and have lost 7 KG! (I started at 97 though!)
Start with easy exercise and it comes back. Don’t worry about weight.

 

Cheers

 

Fiona

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