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17 days post bleed extreme restlessness/anxiety


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My husband had his non aneurism bleed 17 days ago  and was just discharged home from ICU. It's a "no know  cause" diagnosis. We are blessed he is set to recover and  do well, just struggles with his short term memory loss. 

 

Our current biggest symptom we are battling is extreme anxiety & restlessness. He's never had bouts of either before.  He is constantly pacing and his heart is racing. His mind is going 100mph and he very uncomfortable because he feels awful. Our neuro does NOT want to prescribe any sedatives for he feels they'll do more harm then good, possibly 

 

Any help please

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Hi there it's perfectly normal to be feeling anxiety, I still feel it now 14yrs later occasionally, however I would get a second opinion over meds to calm it down as the anxiety cannot be doing him any good. Hope they do something for him soon.

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Hi there

interesting symptoms. I was so dopey after my nasah the restlessness did not kick I until I was a good few months down the line. I can understand the anxiety, you always wonder with the slightest twinge whether it's happening again even though you know it's highly unlikely. 

 

Maybe he needs some form of distraction, get out and do some gentle walks or maybe some projects around the home. As Jess says  a trip to your gp maybe a good idea. 

Hope things improve soon

clare xx

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Hi Jen,

When I woke up and found what had happened to me, SAH, Ventriculitis and Sepsis.  I was so sure I was on my last legs until I found  Behind the Gray alias BTG. This site has helped not only me but my Daughter also. 

 

I found so many people who had a bleed and to know you aren't the only one really helps.

My Surgeon said no stress so I sing,  drives everyone potty,  but I am alright Jack lol.

 

Does he go out at all as my Husband took me out to cafe's for a break and that was when I couldn't sit up properly, I'd slope to one side lol

He knew what would cheer me up "Going Out" then I had a shunt fitted for Hydrocephelus in 2010.  

 

Now we can sit here feeling sorry for ourselves as I did, but coming on here was the best thing I ever done as I wasn't alone anymore.

Surgeon told me never to stress so I sing and it goes down well  !!  Get hubby to come on here and let him know he isn't the only one as it helps xxxx

 

Good luck to you Both

Winb143 xxxx

 

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Sorry to hear of his anxiety and restlessness.  I had anxiety too, but was able to rest ok.  I guess being in the hospital bed for so long got me used to sleeping.  If they don't want to give him any prescription, I would suggest distraction.  Being a typical man, I always showered.  Now I take a couple of hot baths a week to relax.  Perhaps a book or get him to binge watch a good Netflix show?  Maybe a video game or some other hobby to get his mind occupied and give his energy some direction?

 

I hope he feels better soon.

 

Chris

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Hi Jen.  I had extreme anxiety and restlessness when I first got out of hospital, I spent a month in hospital, a short time in rehab then attended rehab as an outpatient. It was there I was told that sleep was actually the best thing for this.  But how could I sleep when my brain was racing just as you describe? 

 

A consultant then prescribed medication for me to take for a month (long time ago so don't remember what it was). Did the trick and I could sleep again and my recovery then picked up.

 

Good luck and hope he gets some help with this.

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Yup, anxiety is perfectly natural.  I still get a little anxious now and again and it manifests as kind of butterfly feeling in my stomach.  Time makes it easier, but we're all different and all have different coping mechanisms. Quiet rooms and deep breaths worked for me - plenty of water too (helps the brain function).

 

I hope it eases for him soon

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Hi Jen

 

I think anxiety is very common, I know that following my SAH it brought to the fore how vulnerable you are and takes away the general untouchable feeling one has.  I think the suddenness of this type of illness also gives some people a huge shock.  I became very emotional and depressed after mine, GP said this is a normal reaction to shock or trauma.

 

I slept terribly after SAH for the first four months as brain just would not quieten, had weird sensations, noises and real bad heads.  I was really tired but eventually gave in and took some tablets prescribed by GP and they helped - was only on for about three months.

 

It is really early days and sure he will improve gradually at his pace, time is a real healer in this aspect.  I hope you are okay as must have been very traumatic for you too.

 

Regards

 

Sharon x

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I suffered a 'no known cause' SAH myself three years ago.  When I got out of the hospital I had extreme anxiety as well and it took until just over a month ago to finally be able to sleep through the night.  For me it was a form of  PTSD and I would get a second opinion on the suggestion of not medicating because you can't heal if you can't find peace and sleep/relax.

 

I find sleep hypnosis has been a huge help for me - gives my mind something to focus on while I'm falling asleep and depending on the topic help me with other issues (self esteem, codependency, etc).  Routine is key right now - make it a routine of now I do this and now I do the next step and your body will learn to do it on it's own but you have to re-teach it again.  At least that is what I found.

 

As for the memory loss -  I was losing my cell phone 12-15 times an hour when I first got home.  I went to the dollar store and bough 4 ugly place mats that I left around the house.  I had to train myself that if I was going to put my phone down it had to be on one of the placemats - and then when I couldn't find the phone I would check the placemats first. 

 

You aren't alone and we do understand - and I know that helps me each and every day.

 

Megan

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Hi Jen Jen

 

It is still very early days in hubbys recover and I think because of what has happened the brain may still be trying to reboot and I think the anxiety is part of the reboot system.  Please have a little more patience,  I hope within the next few weeks you will see hubby settle and be less agitated.

 

I wish you and hubby well but its really very early days in his recovery. One thought it maybe his body's reaction to the blood still round the brain as blood is an antagonistic to the brain out side of the blood vessels. 

 

I hope all goes well.  

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I am so sorry you and your husband are going through this.  Mine was non aneurysmal.  I am 3-1/2 years out and I still have headaches and heavy head.  I do what I want and there are times I pay the price for it.  I was so incredibly scared when I got home from the hospital. 

 

The neurosurgeon saved my life and did his job and told me I would be fine but my neuro was very honest and said it may take 18 months to 2 years to feel better.  Not better like before but better now.  You are never the same.  The anxiety will subside in time.  It was terrible with me too.  My heart raced because of the medicine I was on at the time and I would get these feelings of pure doom.

 

It's so hard to accept what has happened and to know you really have no control of what happened.  I am in the U.S. and have the ability to go to a neurologist any time I like and still have an MRI yearly.  It settles me for awhile.  My neurologist is not my surgeon but he is good and tries to understand.  Really, they never do and kinda look at you in awe.

 

Give it time because it does get better.

 

iola

 

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Hi Jen

i think we have all experienced,and continue to , the varying amounts of anxiety post SAH. The sudden nature of the event, the trauma it causes in our bodies and the confusion and havoc it wreaks in our lives it is no wonder that everything is shaken up to the core. Don't forget, I'm sure you haven't that the injury itself is the brain which is controlling those emotions and chemical releases and depending on where your husbands bleed was this may mean his usual response to everyday situations is heightened.

 

When he feels  like this I can only offer this advice. To stop, sit or lie quietly , watch his body and feelings without worry and concentrate slowly on his breathing , just observing that. If he feels happy to have some music that relaxes him to help then do that. If he can pause after calming down and have a rest and sleep like Momo suggests then do that too. If he can't the main thing is not to beat himself up, it's pretty natural. Main thing is after is happens to switch it up, take a walk, Go outside but not to throw yourself straight at something that is going to be overly demanding. 

 

Maybe he and you are asking  and expecting a little too much too quickly. Without allowing his brain the space to heal then he will just overload and that's a horrid state, so just reel it all in and take very baby steps u til his confidence grows. Make sure sure he is eating regularly and maybe look at what he is eating, plenty of 'superfoods' might be helpful, I can recommend porridge in the morning, the brain is consuming masses of energy so help it to heal. 

 

Go easy Jen, it really has been a torrid time for all of you, we know and empathise with that, even now my kids can be taken back to those months their mum was in the 'brain ward' just because I need to go to bed for a lie down. They know I'm ok but it makes them uncertain and worry and you know what it does me too. It's natural to have the worry but what's off kilter is our ability and response to that. Remember I said about relearning things, this is one of them.

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  • 2 weeks later...
  • 3 weeks later...

I started seeing a neuropsychologist after a few months because of the new anxiety I felt.  I too noticed racing thoughts and so I started to meditate with a teacher.  Both things really helped me as well as yoga.  I had never done this before either and it was a really calming way to move the body without all the 'no pain, no gain' mentality.

 

Even now 5yrs after, I still have the heightened sense of fear and anxiety, but now I've learned new skills to deal with it when it gets intense.  I am able to be quiet with my thoughts and they can be either slowed or watched and not experienced so directly.  My attention is way better.

 

Take care,

~Kris

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